Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Any "appeal" or value to older steel frame 2 strokes?

Recommended Posts

This is a kind of strange question but i have been out of the loop for a while. I am trying to figure out if it is worth while to finish rebuilding a 94 CR125. Do the older steel frame 2 stroke hold any appeal or value over the newer bikes? I am not really just talking money, just overal appeal.

 

The back story is that i got the 1994 CR125 in one peice but needing a lot of love for $200 about 10 years ago.I wanted to use it to play on at Road Attlanta in field and just for stupid fun. As a  I tore it apart i started replacing whatever i found worn out. New swing arm bearings, forks rebuilt, rear shock recharged, headset repacked, new bars, grips and the list goes on and on. Then i got distracted. It is basicly together but needs a good topend, cylinder is groved. I am thinking a Eric Gore 144 kit.

 

But here is the thing. Things have changed for me. What i really want is a good woods bike or dual sport. So the first question is would a 94 CR125 with a 144 kit be good as a woods bike for a small 125lb rider? Or should i just sell it and get what i really want, a dual sport? The other issue is cash value. It does not look like these bikes are worth much, maybe $1000 in great condition? The 144 kit will run me $550 plus my time. If  i am just going to sell it i dont know if it is worth buying the kit and building it.

 

I also kind of like some of the older air cooled thumper dual sports. I have considered picking one up cheap and replacing the crapy old worn suspension with the CR125 forks. It would be a nice upgrade for a old XR. Obviously if i did that i would just part out the CR125.

 

Any thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can afford it I suggest getting what you want asap. Why wait? If you change your mind, go get something different. Life is short, live it now!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

243961.pngflat,550x550,075,f_u2.jpgMan, if you like steelys stick with em! If you want an alloy get it! Ktm and husky have steel frames and people buy em up like hotcakes, ive ridden a 98 cr-250, and honestly i really didn't care about the difference compared to my older crs! So get what you want! 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The one thing i came across when researching alloy frame vs steel is that steel has more flex so will not crack as easy but after owning a 02 cr250 for 9 years iv had no issues with my frame cracking

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are quite a few guys that still have a soft spot for the old steelies.  Your 94 would be worth more than a grand to the right person, the real question is though what's it worth to you?  You've done most of the work already, I'd say finish it and enjoy it, should be a nice bike for you.  But it's definitely not great dual sport material, and it's not as "cool" as some of the newer bikes.  That's a call you'll have to make on your own.

 

FYI, I've been told that my 95 CR250 would be worth over $5k restored to showroom new condition, I'm sure if I found the right buyer I could get $4k for it as is (all original) but... it's not for sale!

 

20150322_173239_zpsziutvveq.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are quite a few guys that still have a soft spot for the old steelies. Your 94 would be worth more than a grand to the right person, the real question is though what's it worth to you? You've done most of the work already, I'd say finish it and enjoy it, should be a nice bike for you. But it's definitely not great dual sport material, and it's not as "cool" as some of the newer bikes. That's a call you'll have to make on your own.

FYI, I've been told that my 95 CR250 would be worth over $5k restored to showroom new condition, I'm sure if I found the right buyer I could get $4k for it as is (all original) but... it's not for sale!

20150322_173239_zpsziutvveq.jpg

dont take this wrong because I'm not trying to insult you, but I'd be shocked if it sold for over 1,500

The real old Cr's are worth a few bucks like 70's models. I have a 88 and it's probably worth the same as yours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dont take this wrong because I'm not trying to insult you, but I'd be shocked if it sold for over 1,500

The real old Cr's are worth a few bucks like 70's models. I have a 88 and it's probably worth the same as yours.

 

You may be right, who knows.  It all depends on finding the right buyer if you're selling something.  The 95's are a bit more unique than the other steelie CR's because of the wild color scheme which some love and some hate.  Makes no difference to me, I don't intend to restore or sell this beauty, just preserve it as-is!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, 125's are not in demand at all so the prices are low.

Most guys look for a 250 and don't think about the fun a 125 can privide.

Just saying that in case you want to resell at some point.

Now, I've found the aluminum frames to be too rigid for woods work. Supercross yeah, it's the one to have to land from a triple or pound over the tops of whoops.

The lowprofile 19' rear tire is also a product for supercross.

I find the sidewall flex in an 18' rear tire helpful in the woods.

Also, I know several older vet riders who have 125's and really love them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has been said that the Honda cr125 motorcycle motor became very bad from 1998 onward. Beings that you have a pre 1998 model, your motor is regarded as a good one. Beings that you have already enlarged the cylinder to 144 CC you should just keep the motor and bike.

IMO, Unless you have a Ktm 500exc you will find dual sport to be full of far too many compromises. Enjoy a good dirt bike until then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steel framed Hondas are alive and well, even if they have been forgotten or undesirable to the people that need to always have the latest and greatest..

Let's start by saying a 125 is perfect for a 125lb rider. Back in the mid 90's, suspension settings were set up much softer, and probably work very well freshened up for a woods bike. Remember they were built before guys were doing 160' double black flip superman grab one handed to no handed landers...

A 144 over bore ported for low end would work excellent in the woods to provide much needed torque on a bike with a narrow power delivery, so it would be a great asset. Add 2 teeth to the rear sprocket for low enough gearing for tight single track and it will have enough high rpm to widen each gear for speed.

I would build a 125 for woods as opposed to a older heavier 4 stroke any day.... the weight savings alone would be a huge benefit, and a faster turning chassis, with older racetrack pedigree would be a fun little bike!

The down side would be the small fuel tank, and the 2 stroke thirst for fuel compared to a sipping 4 stroke, and constantly finding parts for an older bike..

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steel framed Hondas are alive and well, even if they have been forgotten or undesirable to the people that need to always have the latest and greatest..

Let's start by saying a 125 is perfect for a 125lb rider. Back in the mid 90's, suspension settings were set up much softer, and probably work very well freshened up for a woods bike. Remember they were built before guys were doing 160' double black flip superman grab one handed to no handed landers...

A 144 over bore ported for low end would work excellent in the woods to provide much needed torque on a bike with a narrow power delivery, so it would be a great asset. Add 2 teeth to the rear sprocket for low enough gearing for tight single track and it will have enough high rpm to widen each gear for speed.

I would build a 125 for woods as opposed to a older heavier 4 stroke any day.... the weight savings alone would be a huge benefit, and a faster turning chassis, with older racetrack pedigree would be a fun little bike!

The down side would be the small fuel tank, and the 2 stroke thirst for fuel compared to a sipping 4 stroke, and constantly finding parts for an older bike..

 

Great post, and very accurate!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love my 95 250, gets looks no matter where I take it. Everybody whose ridden it can't believe how smooth the power is. I did put newer forks  (98/99 250) on, but besides that she's pretty much stock. Getting ready to start on a 94 125 of my own here soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a kind of strange question but i have been out of the loop for a while. I am trying to figure out if it is worth while to finish rebuilding a 94 CR125. Do the older steel frame 2 stroke hold any appeal or value over the newer bikes? I am not really just talking money, just overal appeal.

 

The back story is that i got the 1994 CR125 in one peice but needing a lot of love for $200 about 10 years ago.I wanted to use it to play on at Road Attlanta in field and just for stupid fun. As a  I tore it apart i started replacing whatever i found worn out. New swing arm bearings, forks rebuilt, rear shock recharged, headset repacked, new bars, grips and the list goes on and on. Then i got distracted. It is basicly together but needs a good topend, cylinder is groved. I am thinking a Eric Gore 144 kit.

 

But here is the thing. Things have changed for me. What i really want is a good woods bike or dual sport. So the first question is would a 94 CR125 with a 144 kit be good as a woods bike for a small 125lb rider? Or should i just sell it and get what i really want, a dual sport? The other issue is cash value. It does not look like these bikes are worth much, maybe $1000 in great condition? The 144 kit will run me $550 plus my time. If  i am just going to sell it i dont know if it is worth buying the kit and building it.

 

I also kind of like some of the older air cooled thumper dual sports. I have considered picking one up cheap and replacing the crapy old worn suspension with the CR125 forks. It would be a nice upgrade for a old XR. Obviously if i did that i would just part out the CR125.

 

Any thoughts?

I guess it depends on the individual, I love the steel frames.  Not sure of any value, but I would think the aluminum frames are generally more desirable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alum frames are more valuable only because of the styling.  If you put newer plastics on a steel frame CR they handle just as good, have a great engine and are a suspension package away from being perfect. 

 

At the end of the day people like looks and edgy plastics and styling sell bikes. The RMZ is an excellent bike but because the styling is old it gets dogged all the time. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...