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Swapping 2015 TAC Forks

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I've been giving some thought about swapping the TAC forks on my 2015rmz for some regular spring type forks .

 The type of riding I do in the desert its starting to be kind of a hassle checking and adjusting air pressure .

I don't race I just like to go riding . A while back I was offered a nice set of spring forks that had all sorts of race tech specialties in it but that was a few months ago. I'm sure he found what he was looking for by now .

 I don't know , Should I stick with the TAC's or swap out ?

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i think the TAC is a really good fork.

 

You could always run the Race tech spring conversion, its $500-600 once you've bought the spring as well, plus they give a 20% TT discount.

 

You can always go back to air and sell off the RT parts when you sell the bike to recoup costs.

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i think the TAC is a really good fork.

 

You could always run the Race tech spring conversion, its $500-600 once you've bought the spring as well, plus they give a 20% TT discount.

 

You can always go back to air and sell off the RT parts when you sell the bike to recoup costs.

That's an option I didn't know about . I'll keep that in mind .Thanks Bruce

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Come to west tn I'll trade you some 12 showas for them ahah

I aint headed in that direction  any time soon . But that'd be pretty cool to ride there one day

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I aint headed in that direction any time soon . But that'd be pretty cool to ride there one day

Haha it was worth a shot. And don't waste your time. Nothing here to ride. Texas is probably better

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I gave up on the TAC forks, I was spending to much time trying pressures and fighting them.

 

I went with Ohlins cartridges .

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Doing it right involves more than just getting some clamps that can adapt the spring forks

#1.  You have to know the front axle offset and make sure the new clamp offset adjusts for the difference in how the axle sits relative to the fork tubes between the different makes of forks.  My recollection is that RMZ have steeper head angles, but the front axle axis sits farther out from the fork tube axis = more trail.  To measure this, you need some V blocks, a decent sized granite plate...and some height gauges.  You need to measure both sets of forks to determine the difference.

 

#2.  You have to get the settled height / fork sag right so the bike actually sits the same under the rider.  This might require some fork mods, or some additional customization of the clamps.

 

#3.  A bike with a flatter steering tube angle will probably have the fork sprung / valved differently.

 

The reason I have been thinking about these things is that I just came off a YZF to a RMZ.  I love way the RMZ turns...but I do miss the amazing feel of Enzo valved KYB suspenders.  Dream bike = RMZ with dialed KYB SSS forks and KYB shock. 

Edited by Blutarsky

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Doing it right involves more than just getting some clamps that can adapt the spring forks

#1.  You have to know the front axle offset and make sure the new clamp offset adjusts for the difference in how the axle sits relative to the fork tubes between the different makes of forks.  My recollection is that RMZ have steeper head angles, but the front axle axis sits farther out from the fork tube axis = more trail.  To measure this, you need some V blocks, a decent sized granite plate...and some height gauges.  You need to measure both sets of forks to determine the difference.

 

#2.  You have to get the settled height / fork sag right so the bike actually sits the same under the rider.  This might require some fork mods, or some additional customization of the clamps.

 

#3.  A bike with a flatter steering tube angle will probably have the fork sprung / valved differently.

 

The reason I have been thinking about these things is that I just came off a YZF to a RMZ.  I love way the RMZ turns...but I do miss the amazing feel of Enzo valved KYB suspenders.  Dream bike = RMZ with dialed KYB SSS forks and KYB shock. 

 

 

 

 

YZF 250 to RMZ 450 or YZF 450 to RMZ 450?

Edited by racertodd

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Doing it right involves more than just getting some clamps that can adapt the spring forks

#1.  You have to know the front axle offset and make sure the new clamp offset adjusts for the difference in how the axle sits relative to the fork tubes between the different makes of forks.  My recollection is that RMZ have steeper head angles, but the front axle axis sits farther out from the fork tube axis = more trail.  To measure this, you need some V blocks, a decent sized granite plate...and some height gauges.  You need to measure both sets of forks to determine the difference.

 

#2.  You have to get the settled height / fork sag right so the bike actually sits the same under the rider.  This might require some fork mods, or some additional customization of the clamps.

 

#3.  A bike with a flatter steering tube angle will probably have the fork sprung / valved differently.

 

The reason I have been thinking about these things is that I just came off a YZF to a RMZ.  I love way the RMZ turns...but I do miss the amazing feel of Enzo valved KYB suspenders.  Dream bike = RMZ with dialed KYB SSS forks and KYB shock. 

 

 

 

 

YZF 250 to RMZ 450 or YZF 450 to RMZ 450?

 

 

 

Was on 2006 YZ250F.  Now on 2011 RMZ450.  I did not go new on the RMZ because I wanted a spring fork.  I actually have the fork working pretty good now.  I had ENZO do a revalve because I have a lot of experience with them.    

 

If you ride too slow, the RMZ fork seems a bit harsh.  But when you start hitting things fast enough, it starts to get tolerable.  Initially, the RMZ cornered so different than I was used to (that and I did not have the sag right yet...too little at first), I was actually going slower into corners.  Now, I am going dramatically faster.  I have such confidence in being able to get the bike over and make it stick that I am hitting the braking bumps a ton faster.  Suddenly, the forks feel OK.  Still not KYB SSS good, but tolerable.  The shock is still a problem.  When I carry the front over chop, it is harsh, no matter what I do or how I adjust it.  In deep accel bumps, it hits like a wall on about the 3rd face and nearly rips the bars out of my hands.  

 

On my YZF...when I carried the front over accel bumps and chop, it was like a pillow.  The RMZ actually rides smoother if I keep the front down and kiss the bumps with the front.  

Edited by Blutarsky

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Was on 2006 YZ250F.  Now on 2011 RMZ450.  I did not go new on the RMZ because I wanted a spring fork.  I actually have the fork working pretty good now.  I had ENZO do a revalve because I have a lot of experience with them.    

 

If you ride too slow, the RMZ fork seems a bit harsh.  But when you start hitting things fast enough, it starts to get tolerable.  Initially, the RMZ cornered so different than I was used to (that and I did not have the sag right yet...too little at first), I was actually going slower into corners.  Now, I am going dramatically faster.  I have such confidence in being able to get the bike over and make it stick that I am hitting the braking bumps a ton faster.  Suddenly, the forks feel OK.  Still not KYB SSS good, but tolerable.  The shock is still a problem.  When I carry the front over chop, it is harsh, no matter what I do or how I adjust it.  In deep accel bumps, it hits like a wall on about the 3rd face and nearly rips the bars out of my hands.  

 

On my YZF...when I carried the front over accel bumps and chop, it was like a pillow.  The RMZ actually rides smoother if I keep the front down and kiss the bumps with the front.  

Its never going to be KYB SSS good even if you put that suspension on the bike... Because its not a 250 its a 450... The 2011 RMZ 450 is one of the most forgiving 450's made. Its not your old comfy girl friend that your use too. Its your new hot skank your going to have to learn what turns her on and makes her go OOOOOOOH or she is going to dump you. I think when you take the time too learn her rather than try to make her your old girl then you both will be in bliss..

 

I have a similar story to yours and also been with Enzo for some time.

 

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Damn you're haulin'. If there was no roost behind you in that pic of you railing that turn, I would of said that you just laid on the ground and had your buddy take a pic of you LOL

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