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Creating a street legal bike

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Im starting with a 2003 cr250r (2-stroke). So Im gonna buy a tusk lighting kit and some D.O.T approved tires. I know I also need a headlight and speedometer, However I had a few questions about this part. Since I am on a students salary I would like to save money were ever possible. So would my bike pass inspection if I just bought a phone mount and bought a speedometer app on my phone and used that? Also since my bike doesn't have a headlight what could I do to avoid paying $300 on a headlight kit? I wont be riding at night so I'm not worried about not having a functional light just something that will pass inspection and not get me pulled over. I live in Colorado by the way, and if anybody knows the titling process I would appreciate any info on that. Any other info would be greatly appreciated!

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I wish I could help. I had started looking into the process here in Michigan but I lucked out and my dealer sold me my bike plated without even having to change the tires. I only had to pay the dealer for $165 for a very basic lighting kit. But my bike (KTM XCF-W)already had a headlight and tail light. It just added the brake light, horn and high/low beams and a cheap mirror.

I don't see any magical solutions to avoid the headlight requirement. Even if you don't pay $300 for the lighting kit with the headlight you're still going to pay money for the brake light, horn, and turn signals (if required).

The kit they put on my bike was made by Sicass.

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Another thing I forgot to mention is that here in Michigan the moment you plate a bike you have to keep insurance on it. Here that's another $300/year.

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You have to have all the DOT requirements for Colorado, and the headlight must have a hi/lo beam on it, tail light/brake light with reflector, DOT tires, a horn, and a mirror. there's a sticky pinned at the top of this forum that goes into this in depth.

Could you "rig" all of this up to a cheap battery to work? Sure. Would you possibly not pass vin inspection? Possibly. If your bike does not have a lighting stator on it, you will have to have the juice to run all of these things with the battery.

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Lots of hoops to jump through now that inspection is required. Biggest issue is that all Japanese MSO's read "for off road use only", tough (though not impossible) to get past that. Most KTM's- plateable straight off the showroom floor, 2 and 4 stroke alike. If you're looking to get by with as little expenditure as possible, good luck.

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I will jump in and help you, but prob not gonna be all that cheap.  You need a lighting stator for the 2003 CR250R.  Steahly offroad offers one:

 

http://www.steahlyoffroad.com/lighting/lighting-coils/honda-lighting-coils/honda-cr-250-02-07-lighting-stator.html

 

It produces 50watts.  This will give you enough to power a 35W headlight.  By the way you dont need hi/lo headlight....just a headlight.  I plated an '09 KX100 using a LED front headlight and LED rear tailight and used a Steahly offroad stator that produced 35 watts total.  I have also plated a KDX200. 

 

You will also need a voltage regulator:

 

http://www.steahlyoffroad.com/lighting/wiring-switches/voltage-regulator-12-volt-ac.html

 

Take a look at the front and rear LED taillights offered by Polisport.  I think I purchased headlight, taillight and brake light switch at Rocky Mountain ATV. 

 

Go here and retrieve form DR2686. 

 

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dmv/forms-number-order-0

 

 

This shows you everything you need to convert an offroad bike to a plated bike.  The requirements are on the second page but it is basically, headlight, tailight, brakelight, horn, mirror, adequate muffler and DOT tires and 2 square inches of reflectors from the rear (can be part of tailight or you can add separate reflectors).  Please note the requirements on page one where you have to have a manufacturer's certificate of origin indicating it is for off road use only (remember you are converting an off-road bike), or a dealer invoice incidating for off road use only or have a bill of sale indicating under penalty of perjury in the second degree that it is an offroad bike.  New to this form is an OHV title can be used as well since that process was just implemented last year.  If you dont have any of these three things it is likely and uphill battle that will not conclude with you getting a plate.

 

Now, once you believe the bike meets the requirements on DR2686, you need to schedule an appointment with your local Colorado State Patrol office to have it inspected.  If you are in Denver Metro you can go to the CSP location in Golden or in Castle Rock.  You will need to call ahead.  Usually takes about 2-4 weeks to find a date you can be inspected.  You will need to bring the DR2686 already completed.  They will charge you $20 (cash or check) and complete the remainder of the form.  They will also give you form DR2704.  You then take these two forms to your county clerk along with proof of insurance (my bike costs $95 per year for insurance meeting the minimum CO requirements), and the paperwork indicating it is an offroad bike (MSO, dealer invoice or bill of sale).  I pay a total of about $140 for insurance per year for all four of my plated bikes (all conversions). 

 

Tell them you want to convert your offroad bike to plated bike and present all forms.  Be sure to take copies of all forms you give to the county clerk as they will keep all of these and send you a title in the mail within about 3 weeks.  They will charge you for your annual plate (which runs about $75) and then they will charge you for the sale tax they never collected when you first bought the bike.

 

Please note that once you are plated, you have to renew your license timely each year.  Failure to do so will cost you $25 per month in late fees up to a max of $100.  If you want to let your plate lapse for some reason because you are not using it, you will have to pay the personal property taxes each year to avoid having to pay the penalty if you later decide to put a plate back on the bike.

 

Here is my estimated cost of converting:

 

DOT Tires ($150)

Headlight ($120)

Lighting Stator ($120)

Voltage Regulator ($20)

Taillight ($35-$50)

Brake Light Switch ($20)

Mirror ($15)

Horn Kit ($50)  (I use the sicassracing universal horn kit that is battery powered)

Sales Tax on orig purchase (4-8% of original purchase price or estimated value whichever is higher).

1st Year insurance ($95)

Annual licensing cost ($75+)

 

If it still sounds like something you want to do, the process isnt that hard.  I currently have 4 plated bikes:  '12 KTM 300, '07 Yamaha WR450F, '06 Kawasaki KDX200 and '05 Yamaha WR250F.  Previously sold plated bikes:  '09 Kawasaki KX100 and '10 Husaberg FE450.  Every one of them I went through the process described above.  Not hard, but time consuming and certainly not free.   The inspection is easy as long as it meets all the requirements listed on the form DR2686.   There are ongoing costs each year of plating ($75) plus insurance ($95).  It is nice not to worry about being legal and we can connect from trail to trail, ride into town for gas or food, or just blast through the neighborhood to test to make sure any changes or mods are working before heading out for a riding weekend.  Good luck, it can be done if you want it. There does seem to be a bit of higher market price when you sell a plated bike so you can recoup some of the one-time costs of bringing up to the plated standards.

 

PM me if you need more information or guidance.

Edited by SilvFx

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I've plated all our bikes with no real problems other than the $ it takes.  I doubt a LEO will say that a temporarily mounted phone with a GPS app will suffice for a speedo.

 

When I plated our 2t 300s, the officer wanted to know how many miles were on each bike (it goes on the title) and he took a close look when I was turning on the speedo. A phone with an app won't have accurate miles. He'll likely look for DOT tires, but perhaps you can borrow a set to save the $. I think the guy who has checked each of my bikes has a sense of whether its got all it needs or not and I suspect that he'll dig deeper if he gets a sense that not all equipment is proper (e.g. a horn thats on there, but doesn't work). At least thats my belief based on my experience with bikes that have everything proper on them, that just get a brief look.  

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I've plated all our bikes with no real problems other than the $ it takes.  I doubt a LEO will say that a temporarily mounted phone with a GPS app will suffice for a speedo.

 

When I plated our 2t 300s, the officer wanted to know how many miles were on each bike (it goes on the title) and he took a close look when I was turning on the speedo. A phone with an app won't have accurate miles. He'll likely look for DOT tires, but perhaps you can borrow a set to save the $. I think the guy who has checked each of my bikes has a sense of whether its got all it needs or not and I suspect that he'll dig deeper if he gets a sense that not all equipment is proper (e.g. a horn thats on there, but doesn't work). At least thats my belief based on my experience with bikes that have everything proper on them, that just get a brief look.  

 

 

Speedometer and/or  odometer are not required to get plated (I know, hard to believe but true....take a look at DR2686 form I linked to above)  Owner will have to sign something indicating there is no odometer and/or accurate mileage reading.  It is a separate document that you sign at the county clerk's office when you get a plate and they submit paperwork for the title.  When the CSP officer inspects, I believe he/she indicates whether there is an odometer (and the mileage) on the DR2704 or DR2686.

 

My  '07 WR450F, '05 WR250F, '09 KX100 and '06 KDX200 only have trip meter and no odometer.  No speedometer on the KDX or KX.  You just have to guess at your speed and of course ride within the posted speed limits when you are on the road.

 

I agree with everything else you have said.  The CSP officer can usually tell right at first glance if it looks to meet the requirements.  I never even had to start the bikes when the Castle Rock CSP inspected.  But they did look closely at tires to ensure they were DOT.  Golden CSP asked me to start to demonstrate the headlight, taillight and brakelight worked. 

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Do newer 2 strokes meet emissions standards?  Isn't that also a requirement?  My 70s bike is legal because it was legal when built.

 

I am speaking strictly about Colorado here.  There are no emissions regulations for converting either a two or four stroke bike from dirt to street plated.  I have plate 3 two strokes in the last 3-4 years ('09 KX100, '06 KDX200 and '12 KTM 300 XCW.  ANd there are no annual emissions tests to receive annual sticker to go on license plate.

 

Plating requirements if you follow my link to DR2686 above:

 

C.R.S. 42-1-102 (55) "Motorcycle" means a motor vehicle that uses handlebars or any other device connected to the

front wheel to steer and that is designed to travel on not more than three wheels in contact with the ground; except that

the term does not include a farm tractor, low-speed electric vehicle, or low-power scooter.

C.R.S. 42-6-102 (15) "Roadworthy" means a condition in which a motor vehicle has sufficient power and is fit to operate

on the roads and highways of this state after visual inspection by appropriate law enforcement authorities. In order to be

roadworthy, such vehicle, in accord with its design and use, shall have all major parts and systems permanently attached

and functioning and shall not be repaired in such a manner as to make the vehicle unsafe. For purposes of this subsection

(15), "major parts and systems" shall include, but not be limited to, the body of a motor vehicle with related component

parts, engine, transmission, tires, wheels, seats, exhaust, brakes, and all other equipment required by Colorado law for

the particular vehicle.

42-4-205(2) Head Lamps — Every motorcycle shall be equipped with at least one and not more than two head lamps

which shall comply with the requirements and limitations of sections 42-4-202 and 42-4-204 to 42-4-231 and part 3

of this article where applicable thereto.

42-4-206 Tail Lamps and Reflectors — Equipped with one tail lamp mounted on rear shall emit red light plainly

visible from a distance of 500 feet. Height measured not more than seventy-two inches nor less than twenty inches.

Every motorcycle shall carry at least one reflector meeting the requirements of this section (5).

42-4-208 Stop Lamps — All motorcycles manufactured or assembled after January 1, 1958 shall be equipped with at

least one stop lamp meeting the requirements of this section.

42-4-223 Brakes — Equipped with brakes to control the movement and to stop and hold a vehicle. One wheel shall

be equipped with brakes.

42-4-224 Horns — Equipped with a horn in good working condition with an audible sound of two hundred feet.

42-4-225 Mufflers — Adequate muffler to prevent excessive noise.

42-4-226 Mirrors — Equipped with a mirror free of obstruction that views a distance of two hundred feet to the rear.

42-4-228(6) Restrictions on Tire Equipment — Must be marked DOT on-road use.

42-12-403 Special Equipment or Modifications — All original safety equipment must be in proper working condition.

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Thats very interesting that you don't need a speedo/odo.  Makes zero sense and you're right...i'd never seen it on the requirements, but put one on each bike without even giving it another thought.

 

I too went to Castle Rock State Patrol. Never had to even take my bikes off the trailer and like you, I didn't hafta start em. I had everything on em and it all worked. The bikes were clean too. That may help in a favorable result, at least a little, cuz the LEO has to get the VIN off the bike.

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You guys in Colorado are lucky!

 

people all over the country are titling bikes through south dakota, it's cheap, it's legal, and it's easy. inspection varies from state to state, station to station. 

 

tag your bikes ! 

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