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02 cr250 searching for traction

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I have owned 4 newer ktm models but never felt as comfortable on them, but they hooked up better with less wheel spin. I use this as a woods bike and have already had the suspension revalved and a pwk carb. I just need a way to get more power to the ground! Im thinking about sending it to eric gorr,rekluse and tubliss. Anyone ever able to put the power to the ground better?

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Tubliss front and rear is night and day vs tubes.

I am stoked on mine, mx52 rear and Mx32 front.

I use a lot of clutch on the trails to keep from spinning in the snotty stuff but carrying momentum helps as does the added traction from the wider tire footprint.

I feel like I get all the traction I need but don't have anymore experiment tire wise with the tubliss setup.

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"I have owned 4 newer ktm models"

 

Although the CR can make a great woods bike, you kinda answered your own question haha

I run a Rekluse but still use the clutch here and there.  Tuned suspension is key of course. Tight single is all I ride and my buds KTMs do tract better but they're also built for woods.  CRs were built for MX, SX. . . .

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Have you tried a heavier fly wheel weight ?   I've ridden a couple of CR250's set up for woods type of riding with a heavier fly wheel weight / gnarly pipe & it made a big difference on the traction.  The gearing would also play a big factor as well depending on your terrain. 

 

Edit: Forgot to add both CR's also had an 18in. rear wheel which helped with traction due to the lower profile tire.    

Edited by H4L
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my 02 cr250 with revalved suspension tracked Great!  just as good as my 09 ktm 250xc.  and the cr handled better.

 

what is your sag set at?  how high are your forks in the triple clamps?

 

what rear tire are you using? how much psi in your tires?  what type of terrain are you riding?  gearing?

 

 

 

 

rekluse and flywheel weights aren't needed to get what you want.  i am a big "anti flywheel weight" rider, as i feel it neuters the bikes power.  and rekluse is cool and all, but i don't like the idea of free wheeling if i stall. 

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I'm a huge fan of the tubliss system, been using it for 2 years now and it's been flawless.  I also replaced all the alum clutch plates with steel. I forgot what weight equivalent is between a flywheel weight but I think it's close to 6oz which was perfect for me.

My bike is also EG tuned which helps too but the Tubliss is what makes the real diff. 

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Ok guys, here are some answers to your questions. Haven't tried a flywheel weight yet, but deciding on size. I run 13/50 gearing,105 on sag, mx32 rear tire and yes the cr handles way better than my old 10 ktm 300xcw. I ran tubliss in the past, but i don't know if i should try it on a 19, or just go all out with an 18 and tubliss ? I also spoke with EG today and im shipping my head and cylinder this week to have cyl shaved and head cut.

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Also im riding hilly, rocky, single track with tree roots. Plan to race some national enduros next year with some local harescrambles.

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I'm running a 01 engine. Flywheel weight,tub liss,lectron carb , gnarley and slightly lowered compression.

Low end isn't strong but VERY smooth. Amazing what it hooks up on. It'll bog up hills other bikes spin and dig in on.

Jetting is one of the biggest things I believe. Most jet for max power and less traction.

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One of the reasons the 05-07 crank is heavier, is to add flywheel inertia weight to help traction without it all hanging outside the end of the crank bearing. Next rebuild add the newer crank, Its a better design and larger rod journal as well. I would also consider a 120/80 rear tire if you wanted to stay with the 19" rim to but a wider footprint on the ground.

 

You could also experiment with the carb needle, to soften the transition to the motors hit, so it doesn't shock load the tire as much. 

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You could also experiment with the carb needle, to soften the transition to the motors hit, so it doesn't shock load the tire as much. 

Good info. -  This would also be another option as well.

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I have an 03 with the base milled, 05 crank, Rekluse Z, and tubliss.

Killer combo for our West Coast conditions. Smooth, tractable power.

Still not 300 tractable power but very close.

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Good info. - This would also be another option as well.

check into the Suzuki needle. 03 rm250. Nech, necw, etc. Lots of ktms using it and a growing number of yz riders
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Try 110 sag.

Also tubliss is the BOMB! I tell my friends that it is like cheating.

For rim size that is up to you. I myself, kept the 19 until I killed it. I knew I would eventually kill my rear rim, so I figured I would just switch to 18 after. Which I did. The 18 felt like flywheel weight to me, probably because there was more weight with more rubber for a tire.

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check into the Suzuki needle. 03 rm250. Nech, necw, etc. Lots of ktms using it and a growing number of yz riders

sorry. 08 rm250

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I ran a few harescrambles last year and learned a lot about myself and my bike. 1st is that riding style and skill will greatly outweigh costly engine mods to gain performance. 2nd is its mostly tight single track(rarely get above 3rd gear) and the stock gearing is terrible for this. I now run 13/52 gearing with a 12oz flywheel weight and it is so much easier to ride in the tight stuff. Harescrambles are about riding smooth, picking your lines, and conserving energy.  A good rider on a 125 will eat and average rider on a 250 for lunch. Setting up the suspension for the woods, a flywheel weight, and a good back tire will make the biggest difference in traction for you.  Weights do not kill the power that much.  I went from spinning tire to holding the front end down after installing mine.  Unless your a Pro rider you'll never even notice a power loss.  You will notice that your rear end doesn't feel like its on ice when the power valve kicks in.

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I ran a few harescrambles last year and learned a lot about myself and my bike. 1st is that riding style and skill will greatly outweigh costly engine mods to gain performance. 2nd is its mostly tight single track(rarely get above 3rd gear) and the stock gearing is terrible for this. I now run 13/52 gearing with a 12oz flywheel weight and it is so much easier to ride in the tight stuff. Harescrambles are about riding smooth, picking your lines, and conserving energy. A good rider on a 125 will eat and average rider on a 250 for lunch. Setting up the suspension for the woods, a flywheel weight, and a good back tire will make the biggest difference in traction for you. Weights do not kill the power that much. I went from spinning tire to holding the front end down after installing mine. Unless your a Pro rider you'll never even notice a power loss. You will notice that your rear end doesn't feel like its on ice when the power valve kicks in.

I would say flywheel weight and suspension. Both make a huge difference. I have a rekluse so I don't need a flywheel weight but having woods suspension is awesome. Bike tracturns is awesome.

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in my opinion, for that bike if you go with the flywheel weight get the big one.  The smaller ones are more of a "fine tuning" thing, you want a noticeable difference.  I believe this requires a spacer and an extra gasket (should be part of the kit) but that's no big deal.  I see no down side even if you are still doing some MX.  These bikes have plenty of power, just need to tame it and tailor it to your riding.  I have the largest weight (13?) and it still power wheelies easily in 5th.

 

Another card you can play is steel clutch plates.

 

I'm curious how much difference 18" vs. 19" makes.  Compared to the CR, the KTM EXCs I've ridden feel like they hook up better in the back but the CR carves better while the KTM pushes the front.  There are so many variables I'm always cautious to generalize too much, but I'm wondering if some of that is the rear wheel size.

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Moto metal, i agree with you on the handling of the two bikes. I also wonder how much an 18 would change the cr.

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