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Suspension linkage grease.

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I thought I'd get in to the habit of greasing the bearings in the suspension linkage. It's only just ticked over 4hrs but read reports that they don't come with much from the factory. Anyway the liqui moly stuff isn't available locally so looking for an alternative I can easily get my hands in in the UK. Also, is it pretty straight forward? Thanks in advance.

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I thought I'd get in to the habit of greasing the bearings in the suspension linkage. It's only just ticked over 4hrs but read reports that they don't come with much from the factory. Anyway the liqui moly stuff isn't available locally so looking for an alternative I can easily get my hands in in the UK. Also, is it pretty straight forward? Thanks in advance.

Its as easy enough job. I use marine grade trailer wheel bearing grease. 

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just did mine. 14 hours on the bike and bearings were all dry very sad from factory

they all do it. Grease must be really expensive ....

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just did mine. 14 hours on the bike and bearings were all dry very sad from factory

Id venture your a fan of pressure washing?

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The steering head bearings and linkage bearings were well greased from the factory on my '16 Beta 300RR, although the steering head bearings were adjusted a little too tight.

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The steering head bearings and linkage bearings were well greased from the factory on my '16 Beta 300RR, although the steering head bearings were adjusted a little too tight.

So are my 350rr's noticed it the other day while washing it, cheaper than a damper :) :)

 

MM 

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The steering head bearings are meant to be that tight. Apparently the headshake many KTM 2Ts experience is because the initial tension in the steering head bearings is lost once the bearings bed in, they need to be adjusted to take up the wear and regain their "like new" steering/handling characteristics.

The forks shouldn't flop from centre, they should have a slight resistance without being notchy...a real "bees dick" type adjustment.....

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Thanks for all the replies but stupid question, can I tell how well they are greased without taking them apart, otherwise I might aswell grease them anyway.

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Ignore that, I've stripped them and they weren't too dry, I added some more grease anyway so hopefully that should help. Anyway, as regards to torquing the bolts, I've got the settings but can see a few people have mentioned them being far too tight, I've also added copper slip to make future maintenance easier so what do people reccomend? I also removed and copper slipped the swing arm bolt and the manual days 120nm

Edited by durham4416

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Ignore that, I've stripped them and they weren't too dry, I added some more grease anyway so hopefully that should help. Anyway, as regards to torquing the bolts, I've got the settings but can see a few people have mentioned them being far too tight, I've also added copper slip to make future maintenance easier so what do people reccomend? I also removed and copper slipped the swing arm bolt and the manual days 120nm

 

 

What is 'copper slip' and what does it do?  Is it like some type of anti-seize?

Edited by Chas_M

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Yeah I guess it's just the same as what you guys call anti seize.

Edited by durham4416

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