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Checking valves

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Easy. 30-40minutes job, and most of that is pulling the tank and shrouds off, to get at the valve cover. Both the owners and service manuals cover the procedure in detail.

A bunch of owners manuals can be downloaded here,

http://hondampe.com.au/repository/owning_a_honda/owners-manuals/off-road.aspx

Pm me ur email if u want a pdf of a service manual.

Edited by nzgsr

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leave the shrouds on the tank pull all three pieces as one. The tank shroud bolts have a history of stripping inside the plastic of the tank with the bolt stuck in the brass insert then the insert rotates in the tank plastic walla stuck bolt. I have found if you have a small impact gun (I use 1/4 drive electric impact) using it in short bursts will usually crack the bolt without stripping the insert from the plastic then never sieze the crap out of it when you reassemble and do not over tighten. Or like I said just leave them on. Its easier to get the bike to TDC with the spark plug out but not required. pull the valve cover set timing at TDC and slide in the gauges. Adjusting is more complicated. Write down the measurements and then if your out of spec you will need a shim kit and the math to know which one you need. Pull the cam gear, cam chain & cam tower, pull it straight up with a little side to side wiggling as possible, change shims replace cam tower and recheck clearance. Once it is in spec reassemble. A book or a DIY video would be a great help.

Edited by ramjetV8

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leave the shrouds on the tank pull all three pieces as one. The tank shroud bolts have a history of stripping inside the plastic of the tank with the bolt stuck in the brass insert then the insert rotates in the tank plastic walla stuck bolt. I have found if you have a small impact gun (I use 1/4 drive electric impact) using it in short bursts will usually crack the bolt without stripping the insert from the plastic then never sieze the crap out of it when you reassemble and do not over tighten. Or like I said just leave them on. Its easier to get the bike to TDC with the spark plug out but not required. pull the valve cover set timing at TDC and slide in the gauges. Adjusting is more complicated. Write down the measurements and then if your out of spec you will need a shim kit and the math to know which one you need. Pull the cam gear, cam chain & cam tower, pull it straight up with a little side to side wiggling as possible, change shims replace cam tower and recheck clearance. Once it is in spec reassemble. A book or a DIY video would be a great help.

thanks bro. I just want to check them. Heard they wear out. Figured since winter is coming now is a good time

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What year is your bike?  

Having a good set of feeler gauges I found helps a lot.  I got some from Fastheads which are a little longer than I was able to find locally.  The longer the better because it is hard to get your hands in there.

Its actually easier than it looks.  This is my first 4t as well, I'm not a mechanic but I have done all my work on my 2 strokes and the 4t seemed intimidating to me at first.  
I have since rebuilt the whole thing, splitting the cases and replaced all the bearings, seals, etc....its not intimidating anymore!  Just a lot tighter spaces to work in.

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Checking the clearances will require a "feel" when using the feeler gauges. You have to check and recheck them to accurately know how to properly feel what the proper tension should be. What helps is to have a set of gauges used specifically for this job. Standard gauges from auto parts stores have blades that are too wide, and need to be cut or carefully ground narrower, because half the feeling of drag you feel is actually the feeler gauge having to bend to fit under the tower.

 

It is more accurate to stack a pile of thinner gauges than use a single thick gauge, because the thinner ones will bend easier, and cause them to slide against each other as you send them under the bucket.

 

I then also put a slight bend on the ends of the individual 0.006" and 0.011" gauges, and use them to reach under the bucket for the final reading..

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Checking the clearances will require a "feel" when using the feeler gauges. You have to check and recheck them to accurately know how to properly feel what the proper tension should be. What helps is to have a set of gauges used specifically for this job. Standard gauges from auto parts stores have blades that are too wide, and need to be cut or carefully ground narrower, because half the feeling of drag you feel is actually the feeler gauge having to bend to fit under the tower.

It is more accurate to stack a pile of thinner gauges than use a single thick gauge, because the thinner ones will bend easier, and cause them to slide against each other as you send them under the bucket.

I then also put a slight bend on the ends of the individual 0.006" and 0.011" gauges, and use them to reach under the bucket for the final reading..

I have a set of snap on ones but I guess those will be to wide. I didn't know they made them in different widths

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Checking the clearances will require a "feel" when using the feeler gauges. You have to check and recheck them to accurately know how to properly feel what the proper tension should be. What helps is to have a set of gauges used specifically for this job. Standard gauges from auto parts stores have blades that are too wide, and need to be cut or carefully ground narrower, because half the feeling of drag you feel is actually the feeler gauge having to bend to fit under the tower.

It is more accurate to stack a pile of thinner gauges than use a single thick gauge, because the thinner ones will bend easier, and cause them to slide against each other as you send them under the bucket.

I then also put a slight bend on the ends of the individual 0.006" and 0.011" gauges, and use them to reach under the bucket for the final reading..

. To add to this I like to use brass feeler gauges as well.

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one thing to note, I didn't mean pull the cam chain out I mean pull the cam gear, slip the chain off the gear keeping a little tension on the chain, then I hook bungie on to chain and to the frame or bars to tight to the bottom gear while I adj the valves.

Edited by ramjetV8

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