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3 Bikes: 5.5x8 vs 5x8?

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Planning to get a utility trailer because my Tacoma short bed is just too tight to comfortably haul 3 bikes (2 full size, 1 XR100) + gear.  I don't want a large trailer (e.g. 6 ft wide) since the Taco is pretty narrow.  Carry-On makes a 5.5x8 that I think would be the ideal size.  But, at that width, it is a heavier duty style; it comes with a pipe top (round) which makes adding connections / eye bolts more difficult and it is heavier.  Plus it has with a gear box on the tongue which is where i'd like to put a spare tire.  Other than being potentially too narrow, their 5x8 is more ideal.  

 

The question is:  Am I overthinking the benefit of the extra 6" of deck width for 3 bikes?  Should I just go with the 5' wide and stagger or reverse one?  May have to do that anyway with the 5.5'.      

5X8GW-2-1024x519.jpg

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i have a 5x9, i can fit 3 full size dirt bikes. 2 forward, one reversed and in the middle. It's a little tight but works well. still room for gas cans and stuff. 

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My 3 rail was 4.5X7. The middle bike was set back about 6", but on a rail, so still about 7' of length under the bike, they all fit fine. I'd think a 5x8 would be plenty.

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i use a 4x8 for 3 full size bikes.  the middle bike goes in backards instead of frontards.   ;)

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I suggest a 5x10. Much more useful in the future and better/faster resale if you choose. More adaptable for additional uses and you will never, ever be able to tell the difference in weight when towing. I also rec a square tube or angle iron rail, much easier to use. If you check closely, many of the "pipe" rails are nothing more than very light tubing that have very little strength. Avoid those.

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I appreciate all of the input!  I feel much more comfortable about a 5x8 ...or 5x10. 

 

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I purchased one of these only in a 4x8 because it would fit next to my house.

You can haul 3 bikes easy with one backwards but we never do as the pickup will still hold one or two bikes with

plenty of room in truck and trailer for gear. It is close to the exact same width as a 2003 duramax (a little wider).

 

https://www.trailersplus.com/Oregon/Portland/5-Wide-Utility-Trailers/trailer/4YMUL0810GN003500

Edited by rolliew
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I suggest a 5x10. Much more useful in the future and better/faster resale if you choose. More adaptable for additional uses and you will never, ever be able to tell the difference in weight when towing. I also rec a square tube or angle iron rail, much easier to use. If you check closely, many of the "pipe" rails are nothing more than very light tubing that have very little strength. Avoid those.

Yep I agree, not much more expensive or heavier but way easier to use. I have a 5x10 now and it tows great.

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I just bought a 5x8 to tow behind my 4runner since I sold my truck.. I was on same boat, and thought about the 5.5 tube top and decided the angle would be better. I didn't like the carry-on brand, looked cheap. I ended up buying a used 5x8 with 3500lb EZ lube axle. It's perfect. Wanted a 5x10, but i didn't find one.

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I have had a 5x10 for 10 years.  It is great.  No need to put the 3rd bike in backwards.  I load 2 bikes close to the side rails tight to the front rail, put a bike stand in the middle, tight to the front rail and this offsets the middle bike so it can be forward loaded.  This frees up space in the rear of the trailer for everything else that you need.  I also recommend getting a trailer with metal mesh on the front and side rails otherwise you will have to strap things down so you don't loose them going down the road.

Edited by 06yz

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you can do it in a enclosed 5x8 but its tight, with a open trailer the bars can hang over.

118_0578_zps49a99484.jpg

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I'm considering a 4x8 trailer for two bikes...mainly because the trailer should be able to squeeze between the house and garage for storage off the driveway. I have found one with an outside dimension (fender-to-fender) of 66-inches max. But I am curious to know how this trailer will "behave" when loaded an in-tow. I've always had a truck but now have a Ford E250 van and towing a trailer will be a new thing for me. Any input? Thanks......

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I'm considering a 4x8 trailer for two bikes...mainly because the trailer should be able to squeeze between the house and garage for storage off the driveway. I have found one with an outside dimension (fender-to-fender) of 66-inches max. But I am curious to know how this trailer will "behave" when loaded an in-tow. I've always had a truck but now have a Ford E250 van and towing a trailer will be a new thing for me. Any input? Thanks......

if it has full size wheels, it will tow a bit better than those crappy harbor freight 4x8 trailer. One thing that will be tricky to learn, especially with that narrow of trailer is backing up. Behind your van, you probably wont be able to see it when you're going straight back, and by the time you do it will be turning quickly. Just takes more practice. A full size 5x8 would be easier in that regard. Either way, you should be able to make it work just fine Edited by motosinko805

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I'm considering a 4x8 trailer for two bikes...mainly because the trailer should be able to squeeze between the house and garage for storage off the driveway. I have found one with an outside dimension (fender-to-fender) of 66-inches max. But I am curious to know how this trailer will "behave" when loaded an in-tow. I've always had a truck but now have a Ford E250 van and towing a trailer will be a new thing for me. Any input? Thanks......

I tow a small trailer behind my van. Worst thing is that you can't see or feel the trailer, so you really have to look for it. I started loading the tallest bike in the middle, just so I could see that it was still there. 

The trailers tow just fine, follow you where ever you go (turning etc.), only thing that gets a little difficult is backing up, when you can't see the trailer. I've thought about boat trailer flags (the type on poles) so i can see the location of the rear corners.

Use the appropriate size drop hitch to keep the trailer relatively level. I put 12" tires on mine, but can fit up to 15"ers.....small narrow tires reduce rolling resistance, but to small and the bearings need to be serviced every couple hundred miles.

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I'm considering a 4x8 trailer for two bikes...mainly because the trailer should be able to squeeze between the house and garage for storage off the driveway. I have found one with an outside dimension (fender-to-fender) of 66-inches max. But I am curious to know how this trailer will "behave" when loaded an in-tow. I've always had a truck but now have a Ford E250 van and towing a trailer will be a new thing for me. Any input? Thanks......

 

With a short tongue you chase them when backing up.  As small as they are I have had people hit them at stop light's because they were looking over them. Put something on the back like what a snow plow has on it so you and others can see it.

The ones with a tip up gate was better if the person behind you is off in la la land.

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