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Enduro suspension question.

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I have been watching a lot of enduro vids on Youtube and I can see that the enduro bikes have what looks like a really squishy for lack of a better term suspension. How do you get that type of travel without bottoming out on everything? I have the stock suspension( I guess because I bought it used) on my 2007 sm with s wheels and I have the rebound and compression all the way out and it still doesn't feel squishy. I weigh about 230 ready to ride and my bike rides great to me but when I am going over something, The back end feels harsh but the front feels great. Are the enduro bikes really that squishy or are they just riding so hard it just looks like it? They look like they have no rebound dialed in by the way that they bounce the front off of obstacles and it springs up so fast that they use it to get over stuff. I am just wondering if the DRZ is capable of that without lots of money thrown at the suspension.

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 If you have the rebound dampening all the way out (counterclockwise), you've gone the wrong way, going clockwise will un-harshen things

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Yeah it can be done, but it will require a revalve and proper springs for your weight.

 

As far as clickers go, I don't like to look at adjustments as "stiffer" or "softer" because that's not really what they do. Those are secondary effects of adjustment. What the clickers do is adjust the "speed" of the shock's/fork's action. Close the screw to slow down the action, open them up to speed up the action. The trick is learning how to apply this to your bike.

Edited by ptgarcia
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 If you have the rebound dampening all the way out (counterclockwise), you've gone the wrong way, going clockwise will un-harshen things

I thought that all the way out made it so that you have no rebound and all the way in was hard or full rebound dampening. I guess I will have to look at the manual again. Thanks again.

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I have been watching a lot of enduro vids on Youtube and I can see that the enduro bikes have what looks like a really squishy for lack of a better term suspension. How do you get that type of travel without bottoming out on everything? I have the stock suspension( I guess because I bought it used) on my 2007 sm with s wheels and I have the rebound and compression all the way out and it still doesn't feel squishy. I weigh about 230 ready to ride and my bike rides great to me but when I am going over something, The back end feels harsh but the front feels great. Are the enduro bikes really that squishy or are they just riding so hard it just looks like it? They look like they have no rebound dialed in by the way that they bounce the front off of obstacles and it springs up so fast that they use it to get over stuff. I am just wondering if the DRZ is capable of that without lots of money thrown at the suspension.

i would start with reading recomend racetech suspention bible.

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I thought that all the way out made it so that you have no rebound and all the way in was hard or full rebound dampening. I guess I will have to look at the manual again. Thanks again.

 

No, your thinking right, don't know what Dmouse is talking about, but sometimes when you do make an adjustment to try do improve a certain trait, you end up making it worse. So many factures at play that all have to be considerd. And i also agree that reading RaceTech's suspension bible is one of the best things you could do to prepare yourself playing with suspension.

 

And no, the DRZ will never be good at bouncing the front end over obstacles, it's just too front end heavy and the 4 stroke motor doesn't have the quick snap of a 2 stroke. I soon learned in the woods to just plow through stuff. If you want to dance like a ballerina, look for a different bike.

Edited by bucket list

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Oh, and an other thing, it's my feeling that the DRZ rear suspension linkage rising rate,  ramps up very quickly near the end of the travel (bottom) so with your weight, if your riding quite low already in the availible travel, and you hit a large bump, it will feel very harsh. Thats why getting a good initial setup with proper spring rate and preload is vital.  Again that book will be GOLD (pardon the pun) to you.

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 As far as I know, and I think I'm correct, hardening the rebound dampening slows the response of the shock or forks from rebounding after being compressed, thus making it less bouncy. You can always try your adjusters "in the field" on a straight, choppy section, and see how your bike behaves, I think you'll find it's less harsh with the rebound turned in

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Here's some light reading material 🙂

 

https://thumpertalk.com/topic/1035004-drz-fork-revalve-shim-stack-discussion-recommendations/

 

http://www.shimrestackor.com

 

 

Spring for your weight. Don't not spring for your weight.

 

Also revalve. Don't not revalve.

 

The stock springs are too soft for any use anywhere, and the clickers are next to useless. The clickers only affect the low-speed compression and rebound, but the problems the stock suspension has are chiefly in the region of high-speed travel. (High-speed / low-speed as in the speed the dampers are travelling, not the speed of the bike.) Enduro bikes are going to have springs on the stiff side, correctly chosen up for rider weight and obstacle size vs. speed of bike over them, and stiff, fast, controlled valving with as fast rebound as possible. Probably a progressive damping curve, while the DR-Z curve is highly digressive (and therefore it wallows and handles unpredictably.)

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I have been watching a lot of enduro vids on Youtube and I can see that the enduro bikes have what looks like a really squishy for lack of a better term suspension. How do you get that type of travel without bottoming out on everything? I have the stock suspension( I guess because I bought it used) on my 2007 sm with s wheels and I have the rebound and compression all the way out and it still doesn't feel squishy. I weigh about 230 ready to ride and my bike rides great to me but when I am going over something, The back end feels harsh but the front feels great. Are the enduro bikes really that squishy or are they just riding so hard it just looks like it? They look like they have no rebound dialed in by the way that they bounce the front off of obstacles and it springs up so fast that they use it to get over stuff. I am just wondering if the DRZ is capable of that without lots of money thrown at the suspension.

 Sorry, I misunderstood what you were trying to achieve. Anthons' reply was good, your SMs' suspension would be difficult to get to what you're trying for. My Es' suspension is pretty tune-able, it responds well to the clicker adjustments, especially the front

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Here's some light reading material 🙂

https://thumpertalk.com/topic/1035004-drz-fork-revalve-shim-stack-discussion-recommendations/

http://www.shimrestackor.com

Spring for your weight. Don't not spring for your weight.

Also revalve. Don't not revalve.

The stock springs are too soft for any use anywhere, and the clickers are next to useless. The clickers only affect the low-speed compression and rebound, but the problems the stock suspension has are chiefly in the region of high-speed travel. (High-speed / low-speed as in the speed the dampers are travelling, not the speed of the bike.) Enduro bikes are going to have springs on the stiff side, correctly chosen up for rider weight and obstacle size vs. speed of bike over them, and stiff, fast, controlled valving with as fast rebound as possible. Probably a progressive damping curve, while the DR-Z curve is highly digressive (and therefore it wallows and handles unpredictably.)

now i have a question for ya the SM or the S. im assuming an s which is a damper rod or conventional type; please correct me if im wrong; and the SM is cartridge type. bothe forks are to soft but the S is softer than the SM.

but, usualy you start with the springs front and rear to riding weightwith all your gear on, next gold fl(front and rearvalves and emulators (front) [never ran them but there only made for your type of forks]. and fork oil.

just gonna say thougt the ar some of the best mods after its dialed.

Edited by HooliganNation

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DRZ-S still has an ancient rod style fork

DRZ-SM has a resprung and revalved RMZ450 usd cartridge fork.

 

The drz-s pushrod fork is a lost cause IMO. Don't get me wrong, springing it for your weight in the woods, racetech gold valve & correct weight fluid will make a noticeable difference in the forks performance but it will never be a decent enduro fork.

 

The SM fork is a better starting place but will certainly require work to be competent in the woods. Same goes for the SM rear shock. SM suspension is like 90% street / 10% offroad. It has much less travel, is much stiffer and is set lower than it needs to be for real off road riding. Also, with a suspension set up for the woods, street manners will be impacted for sure. Call up racetech, they'll get you set up for the woods pretty cheap. Once you are properly setup for the woods, you should notice a massive difference. 

 

The other issue here is shear weight of the bike and gearing for enduro riding. Its a heavy pig that is geared way too high and will just wear you out in the slow 1st gear stuff. The drz is a great adventure bike that will take you just about anywhere and back but if you want to be zapping big logs, pounding through baby-head rock fields, double punching up vertical rock faces and the like; I would advise you to get a lighter bike that is geared and sprung for that kind of stuff. 

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DRZ-S still has an ancient rod style fork

DRZ-SM has a resprung and revalved RMZ450 usd cartridge fork.

 

Sorry, you're wrong. Absolutely and certainly.

 

As ptgarcia said: Beginning in 2002, S forks are conventional cartridge forks.

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And the S model's conventional cartridge forks are good units! Not a lost cause at all, fortunately! It's just that the stock valving and springs are rather poor.

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And the S model's conventional cartridge forks are good units! Not a lost cause at all, fortunately! It's just that the stock valving and springs are rather poor.

if you have the S forks you can also run berringer brake which as last i checked was ony available for the DRZS

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I had to double check and I was indeed wrong, 02+ DRZS have cartridge forks. Its the DR650 that still has the rod forks, my bad. Its been a while since I had my fork redone. 

The stock forks, resprung & valved are fine for adventure riding and general offroad riding but if you want to get serious about enduros, harescrambles, enduro crosstraining...etc. You'd be better off swapping forks and starting with a better performing fork to begin with IMO. The fork will still glance off of rocks and roots and square corners. I still ride my S all the time but have been doing quite a bit of enduro cross training on my buddy's trials bike and now on my FE350. I can tell you for a fact that the stock S fork properly set up with racetech parts does not come close to either the sherco or the FE350. That is probably an unfair comparison but my point is...there are way better forks out there to start with that will ultimately cost you less money to get better performance out of, IF you want to get serious about enduro. This my opinion and experience, the opinion and experience of others may vary. 

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