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Standing Through Corners

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Can someone tell me if I weight the inside or outside peg going through a trail on loose gravelly surface(standing through corners in general), should my weight be neutral,forward or back on a gravel surface.

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If your turning left you weight the right side peg as you turn. You always weight the opposite side you are turning and point you're toe were you want to go.

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Can someone tell me if I weight the inside or outside peg going through a trail on loose gravelly surface(standing through corners in general), should my weight be neutral,forward or back on a gravel surface.

Thanks, like the toe advice, practising in my chair as read your post I notice this turns the chair where I want to go. Look forward to trying that on my bike.

What about the weight thing on gravel?

The weather in the Central Wheatbelt 1 hour North of Perth, Western Australia is warm and still, just turned the aircon on.

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I normally like to keep my weight farther forward so the front tire doesn't slip out. And weight outside peg

Edit

And if you can stay standing it is generally faster I think

This is for sitting, I don't stand much through corners

Edited by jay bird1138
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Can someone tell me if I weight the inside or outside peg going through a trail on loose gravelly surface(standing through corners in general), should my weight be neutral,forward or back on a gravel surface.

Like the other post weight the front say 60-40 or what ever feels better I like to hold the bars tighter and lean back some while leaning into the turn but it doesn't work for everybody.

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I have a difference of opinion here.  I almost ALWAYS weight the inside peg, weight forward and lean the bike into the turn.  I've found through trial and error that this works better for my bike, in my terrain.  

 

Sitting, YzCas's advice is spot on.  Weight the outside, point inside foot (leg out) and lay the bike into the turn.

 

Most important is to lean the bike down into the turn.  

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I have a difference of opinion here. I almost ALWAYS weight the inside peg, weight forward and lean the bike into the turn. I've found through trial and error that this works better for my bike, in my terrain.

Sitting, YzCas's advice is spot on. Weight the outside, point inside foot (leg out) and lay the bike into the turn.

Most important is to lean the bike down into the turn.

My advice was for sitting. Standing is for you young bucks.
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It depends on what you want the bike to do. Weighting the inside peg can loosen up the rear end and help you turn in a little more. Weighting the outside helps you squeeze the bike and stabilize the rear end. As for which one you should weight I usually ride with my weight evenly on the pegs and then shift from side to side depending on what I want the bike to do. As fofront and back weight I stay forward of neutral and make sure I'm getting pushed through the legs most of the time. Riding on the balls of your feet gives you a lot more control when working the pegs.

On flat gravel corners like you are asking about, weighting the inside peg will increase your lean angle, giving your rear end less traction and allowing it to step out so you can turn sharper, at the price of forward traction. Weighting the outside peg decreases lean angle, bringing the back end in line. Basically, inside peg helps you steer with your rear tire and outside weight helps you steer with your front tire, so you can't turn as tight but get better forward traction. On faster sweeping corners it's not uncommon to switch back and forth multiple times through the same corner.

Edited by Blowin_Trannys
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My advice was for sitting. Standing is for you young bucks.

OP was specifically asking about standing.  Reading comprehension FTW.

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OP was specifically asking about standing. Reading comprehension FTW.

A like its the end of the world GFY!!!!!!!!

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A like its the end of the world GFY!!!!!!!!

I'm not sure what you are trying to say here, but I think it might be an attempt at an insult?

 

OP, sorry for derailing your thread, but dammit, someone is WRONG on the internet.

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I'm not sure what you are trying to say here, but I think it might be an attempt at an insult?

OP, sorry for derailing your thread, but dammit, someone is WRONG on the internet.

Troll get over yourself you are the one starting. Stop!!!

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Weighting the outside peg is the preferred technique for sitting in turns. If it's a sharp turn while standing, weighting the inside helps the bike turn and lean in that direction, otherwise it just wants to stand up and push through the turn.

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Yes, sitting is like Cas says. Weight slightly forward on the bike, inside leg out over the front axle, outside elbow up, and push your weight down into the outside peg through your foot. Looks like you're sitting, but the action of pushing down through your outside foot should de weight your butt off the seat a bit. Bring the power off smooth and on smooth and sort of steer around using the rear end. On a flat your bars may be turned slightly out like counter steering, but with a bit of a berm you can actually turn in slightly to turn more aggressively.

Try to find that sweet spot where the bike is in that happy place between sliding out and high siding......and for heaven's sake if you feel the bike sliding out just lay it down. Panicking and shutting off the throttle abruptly can lead to going over on the high side which is very BAD. You are far better off to just let it slide out, even if it means giving it a little blip of the throttle once you know it's slid too far to save it......just blip the gas and lay it down.......hurts much less, trust me. Keep that inside leg up nice and high over the ground too, and don't dab unless you have too. Low siding can tear ACL's and miniscus if you drag your leg a lot.

For standing it is like the opposite. It is more like a ski slalom where you are carving and stepping your weight onto the inside foot, and the bike will magically turn in that direction.... There are a lot of situations where it may not be practical to always hang a leg out there, and sometimes it can get you hurt. Ideally it is best to keep your feet on the pegs as much as possible.

Edited by Fattonz
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Body inside , bike more upright at higher speeds . Leaning bike down , body above on tighter turns .  Forcing the bike down makes it turn quicker . Weighting pegs is an improper term for shifting your weight inside or out . Both pegs are connected together .  A  1 legged rider can still do the same thing .

Edited by JoeRC51

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Body inside , bike more upright at higher speeds . Leaning bike down , body above on tighter turns .  Forcing the bike down makes it turn quicker . Weighting pegs is an improper term for shifting your weight inside or out . Both pegs are connected together .  A  1 legged rider can still do the same thing .

 

you can have your weight to the inside, and still weight the outside peg. Weighting the pegs and where your body weight are completely different things.

Edited by Blowin_Trannys
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you can have your weight to the inside, and still weight the outside peg.

This is merely shifting your weight inside.

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Weighting the pegs and where your body weight are completely different things.

 

There's NO SUCH THING as peg weighting. Ask somebody that gradgiated high skool.

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There's NO SUCH THING as peg weighting. Ask somebody that gradgiated high skool.

Yes, weighting pegs is a mythical unicorn. Insulting people is not a great way to gain credibility here.

It's not uncommon, at least in my experience, to have your centre of mass toward toward the inside of the motor cycle, while pushing down into the outside peg or vice versa.

Ever heard of a moto racing/teaching legend by the name of Gary Semics? Weighting pegs seems alright by him, and many, many other instructors/racers:

Some of it could be line selection. When sitting do you have both feet on the pegs or your inside foot out for the corner...how are the fast riders doing it? Depending on how big the rollers are it maybe necessary to loft the front wheel just over the rollers. If sitting make sure to weight the pegs or if your inside foot is out as least weigh the outside peg.

Edited by Fattonz
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