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DIY Strapless Bike Tie-down system

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I posted about this a few years ago in the trailer set-up thread.

 

https://thumpertalk.com/index.php?/topic/296280-Enclosed-Trailer-Setups#entry10577511

 

Since then, I have had a few questions in private messages about how it is made so I thought I would post a Document that explains it.  Basically it is a very easy way to clamp your bikes down securely using the foot-pegs rather than using straps on the handlebars.  Total cost is about $30 per bike which is about as much as a good set of tie-downs.  I hope this helps somebody else out.

 

IMG-20120730-00112.jpg
 
 

 

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I have always been under the impression that you should not to haul a bike with a load on it's rear suspension (strapped down)

the internals/seals being under increased and continuous pressure from the compressed nitrogen.

 

but rather simply running a strap thru the rear wheel to prevent the back end of the bike from jumping around on the trailer.

Edited by mlatour

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How is the plank secured to trailer floor? I've got an enclosed with t-track up the sides with a finished floor that I'm not keen on drilling through. I've currently got a piece of unistrut sideways between the two tracks and was using turnbuckles off that to secure bikes. Thinking about converting to this method.

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The plank is bolted to the floor such that the whole thing can be removed when the trailer has other duties to perform. I ran it this way for a few years but recently mounted the board under the floor and just drilled big holes to screw the pipes down through. This makes it a bit easier as the front wheel does not have to bump over the board while loading and it is easier to sweep dirt out.

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I have always been under the impression that you should not to haul a bike with a load on it's rear suspension (strapped down)

the internals/seals being under increased and continuous pressure from the compressed nitrogen.

 

but rather simply running a strap thru the rear wheel to prevent the back end of the bike from jumping around on the trailer.

From what I see there would be none, or very little compression of any suspension component. the bike is clamped into position probably less compression than rider sag. Static compression on fork seals is not good either.

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After taking a closer look,

the fact that there is support under the footpegs makes it that it shouldn't require too much compression of the suspension to keep the bikes stable.

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Great set up, but I bet you a Benny I could strap my bike into my trailer way faster than you can rig one of ur bikes with that set up. Not bagging on it don't get me wrong I love the ingenuity just seams a bit clunky. I can strap my bike or any of my kids bike in less than a minute.

Do you ever in unscrew the pipe clamps to get them out of the way? Would be cool it they were hinged and folded down and out of the way. Seams like they would always be in the way when inside the trailer gearing up and such.

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The reason I originally did it was to be able to fit five full size bikes in a 6x12 enclosed trailer. With tiedowns your bars bang into each other or the side of the trailer unless you stagger the bikes. With this method you can have the bars turned and they fit right in three across. You also do not have to contort your body to get to the tiedowns and lean a bike this way then that while they are banging into each other. This way you push them in...lean on the seat a bit to compress the rear suspension about a half inch and then crank them down. Less than 30 seconds.

I do remove the pipes if we are going in and out of the trailer a lot. Surprisingly they do not get in the way much when changing etc.

I had about ten different designs for doing this and this was the cheapest and easiest method of them all. I get it that it looks a bit redneck....but I really don't care because it works great for me.

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Nothing wrong with redneck ingenuity. Mounting the pipe flange below the floor makes sense. I think a cam lock QD male/female on the pipe would make it quick to install/remove, but it would cost more.

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Not trying to turn this into a trailer set up thread, but getting 5 full size in a 6 x 12 - even with 3 across as pictured - seems challenging.  Do the other 2 go in backwards and if so, how are they secured (removable chocks etc).  Seems whether then go in frontwards or backwards the tires must fit between the 3 bikes in front row?  Each bike is about 7 feet long...so about 2 feet of overlap required (assuming its a V trailer)

 

Asking because I'm about to get a 6 X 12 V nose but only need 4 bikes.   Was going to use your foot pegs tie downidea but for set up I was thinking:

1) First bike into the middle all the way to front of nose.  Not perfectly straight  - rear end shifted to the right 6" or so.

2) Next 2 go on near/against side walls - and back 2 or 3 feet from front of V and "straight in"

3) Last one goes in backwards using removable chock with rear wheel shifted 6" left of center (to clear first bike rear wheel).

 

A diagram would be worth 1000 words....may work on a "stick diagram" this afternoon and re-post but for now gotta run.

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Attached it the way we get all five bikes in.  It is not to scale etc. but it gives you an idea.  They all fit in without hitting each other.   The last two go in backwars and we just put the front tire into the corner of the trailer.  We just strap those two because the pipes would get in the way of getting the first three in.  Also the straps are easy to access with the ramp door down.  You could get five in with straps but the front three are a pain to get in and you have to be able to contort your body more than I am able to these days...we rarely haul five bikes but we can and do this way.  Most of the time we only have two bikes and a pit bike or a moped or two....

 

<a href="http://s1253.photobucket.com/user/humbugtru1/media/5Bike_configuration.jpg.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://i1253.photobucket.com/albums/hh594/humbugtru1/5Bike_configuration.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo 5Bike_configuration.jpg"/></a>

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Seen a few of those but doesn't it take a while to tighten down. I'm assuming it's a half a turn at a time with an open wrench?

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Seen a few of those but doesn't it take a while to tighten down. I'm assuming it's a half a turn at a time with an open wrench?

. No just tighten by hand. Takes about the same amount of time as straps.

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The reason I originally did it was to be able to fit five full size bikes in a 6x12 enclosed trailer. With tiedowns your bars bang into each other or the side of the trailer unless you stagger the bikes. With this method you can have the bars turned and they fit right in three across. You also do not have to contort your body to get to the tiedowns and lean a bike this way then that while they are banging into each other. This way you push them in...lean on the seat a bit to compress the rear suspension about a half inch and then crank them down. Less than 30 seconds.

I do remove the pipes if we are going in and out of the trailer a lot. Surprisingly they do not get in the way much when changing etc.

I had about ten different designs for doing this and this was the cheapest and easiest method of them all. I get it that it looks a bit redneck....but I really don't care because it works great for me.

 

Any reason you couldn't just bolt the flanges right to the trailer floor?  Is the board required for any additional support?  The 3/4" flanges I have seem to be low profile enough for whenever the mounts are removed, but I just wasn't sure if the board is not also required for support.

 

Thanks for sharing this.  It's exactly what I was looking for!

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I doubt that going through the board (reverse mount) is important, but being an engineer, and without finding any structural inoformation on pipe flange mounts, I decided stronger is better and did it this way.  The board takes a lot of the stress off of the threads which I thought might break under fatigue loading due to the stress concentration of the threads.  After miles and miles of use, I believe there to be a very large safety factor and I could have gotten away without the extra support of the board.  I ended up using only 1/2" pipe clamps and they worked fine.  At 3/4", you should be even safer.

 

Where in Michigan are you from?  I am in the GR area if you ever want to see them in person.  We are also at all of the D14 Harescrambles races if you ever go to one of those and want to have a look.  Happy to share - always willing to help out a fellow off-roader!

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I doubt that going through the board (reverse mount) is important, but being an engineer, and without finding any structural inoformation on pipe flange mounts, I decided stronger is better and did it this way.  The board takes a lot of the stress off of the threads which I thought might break under fatigue loading due to the stress concentration of the threads.  After miles and miles of use, I believe there to be a very large safety factor and I could have gotten away without the extra support of the board.  I ended up using only 1/2" pipe clamps and they worked fine.  At 3/4", you should be even safer.

 

Where in Michigan are you from?  I am in the GR area if you ever want to see them in person.  We are also at all of the D14 Harescrambles races if you ever go to one of those and want to have a look.  Happy to share - always willing to help out a fellow off-roader!

 

Thanks again for your help.  I'm in the metro Detroit area and typically ride north around Kalkaska.  Haven't been to any of the Harescrambles but would like to sometime.

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