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2010 Beta 400 RR - Long Term Maintenance Info?

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Hello All,

 

Questions for you on the long term maintenance of a 2010 Beta 400 RR.

 

I am interested in one that is local to me, however the mileage and hours are a little high.  Stats and mainenance done to date are listed below (taken from the add).  I left out the minor maintenance stuff (chain, fluids, etc.).

 

Bike has 398 hours (10000 KM).

Piston ring replaced last year at 300 hours and everything was in really good shape.
Timing chain was replaced at the same time.
Also replaced is the valve guide.
Oil pump gear and Water pump seal. 

 

 

I have a found a few examples of these bikes making it to 11,000 kms, but not past that.  I understand that this is the first year of the BETA motor, so long term results are limited.

 

I have seen a few threads of chewed up heads, from the oil pump gears failing (which seems to be a known issue), and cam bearings spinning.

 

The fact that the piston ring(s) were replaced makes me nervous.  I assume oil pump gears failed.

 

No mention of valve adjustments.

 

Questions as follows:

  1. Does anyone know of these bikes lasting past 10,000 km?
  2. If I buy it, should I plan on a new head and possibly cylinder in the near future?
  3. Are there any known issues with these bikes, besides the plastic oil pump gears?
  4. If the oil pump gears did fail, are the bottom end bearings now going to be suspect?

My plans for the bike are probably 50/50 road/dirt.  Including some tighter technical trails, and some freeway riding.  There is a small chance I might try to adventure tour it (long distance super slab).

 

Price wise, the guy is asking $4,700 CAD when similar bikes are going for $6,500 CAD.

 

Any input is appreciated.

 

Thanks,

Chris

 

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Bump.

 

Anyone have any experience with these bikes that might be relevant?

 

Thanks,

Chris

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Not sure how many 400's were sold, but they according to a friend that owned one, they were very nice enduro bikes, but did not have the snappy wheelie inducing fun that the 450 produced. But that in my mind does not make them bad at all. 

 

Just bear in mind that there were a few changes till 2013 which was the last year for the 400 I believe.

I'd want to know who rebuilt it, while the top end was off did they inspect with indicators the side play etc. of the crankshaft.

IF it had valve guides, then most likely all valves were done at the same time, and few I know of would change valve guides without replacing all the valves in todays modern 4-strokes. 

 

IMHO If i was going to do a 50/50 dirt/highway I'd be looking at a full open class 498/520, as a couple of old articles on them (400) said they needed to have lower final drive gearing than what they came with, which is fine until you turn onto the highway.

As Adventure Touring on a 400, hmmm? 

Any 300+ hour dirt bike will have some hidden aspects to it, they may be just a few little one, or a biggie.

 

I might save my rubles and look for a 498/520 with less hours, much better dual sport bike, hands down.

Best of luck.

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Thanks JustRon, I saw that thread, but forgot to convert from miles to km!

 

Good info MarkBevans thank you.  The more I think about it, the more the sellers story seems a little fishy, or not as complete as it should be.  I suspect the oil pump gears failed, and he may have taken some short cuts, just to get it up and running again.  More displacement is a good suggestion too.

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Thanks JustRon, I saw that thread, but forgot to convert from miles to km!

 

Good info MarkBevans thank you.  The more I think about it, the more the sellers story seems a little fishy, or not as complete as it should be.  I suspect the oil pump gears failed, and he may have taken some short cuts, just to get it up and running again.  More displacement is a good suggestion too.

Here you go, just what the Doctor ordered. Road Trip??

http://sfbay.craigslist.org/sby/mcy/5405830583.html

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Here you go, just what the Doctor ordered. Road Trip??

http://sfbay.craigslist.org/sby/mcy/5405830583.html

 Chrscott, I only did this once it has been 40 years since I bought a vehicle out of country, I bought a 1969 Audi when I was stationed in Germany. Paid $200 Deutch Marks which translated to about $500 US. I had to laugh at the time because it cost me more to insure it each year than I paid for it. :banghead:  I gave the car to a friend when I left. 

 

Not sure if you buying a bike in US makes any sense but I looked up the exchange rate. Is this a decent deal for you? What would a new 480/500 Beta cost you out the door if you bought it from a Canadian Dealer? Just curious how value transfers across the border. 

6000 CAD = 4102.0031 USD 

6000 USD = 8776.2 CAD 

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Value does transfer well.  Those bikes up here would be around $8K - $9K.  But given the current state of the Canadian Peso, there is not much to be gained by buying south of the border right now. 

 

For reference, there is a 2009 KTM 530 EXC listed for $6600, in decent shape.

 

Bringing something across the border is a pain.  Duty fees, vehicle inspection, etc.  I would be leary of trying it with an enduro, as we are not allowed to plate dirtbikes up here anymore, and they may not issue a certification due to some warped view of a foreign enduro.  They seem to like making it difficult for people to bring vehicles across the border.

 

I will keep an eye on the classifieds up here, but I am thinking that I will need more money to get what I want (or wait another year or two).

 

Thanks all,

Chris

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Hey that sound like my bike.

Not so many people are crazy enough to ask a mechanics if he need to open the the engine at 300 to see if everything is good. 

Sure the answer is Yes you should.

 

So it's my first dirt bike and I was not sure of the best things to do to keep it in the best shape possible.

The valve were checked and adjusted, as needed, twice before that.

So I went to Gnarly parts and asked to have the engine checked.

After the mechanic Chad, removed the head and the cylinder, everything was in perfect order.

The swirl mark of the cylinder were still intact.

 

"So he told me, now we need to change the Ring, we're not using the old one. 

Since the engine is open, better to change the valve guide, that might be a weak ponit.

If the timing chain is not too expensive, might be better to change it, since it easy to do now."

 

The timing chain was good, but for 120$, better to do it.

 

A friend blow the head on is bike after the oil pump gear failed, so i changed mine early.

I had the coolant problem, coolant leak to the trany oil.

So i got it fixed and replaced (o-ring and seal) the oil gear were only 50$.

They suggest to change the oil gear if the bike overheat or have coolant leak, so i did it.

 

The bike is 400 hours, mostly trails and FSR.

And the KM are only 10000 KM (Maybe not accurate, since I never cared and never noticed if it can be reset)

 

A friend had more than 450 hours and around 25000 km (but the bike was stolen), he did more road than I. 

 

The bike is priced according to the usage I did and the hours.

 

I I was to sell a fishy story, I would have replaced the Trail Tech computer by a new one, worth only 80$.

 

For sure it's hard to believe it can have so many hours, if you compare to a KTM. The KTM will have been rebuilt probably twice at 400 hours :-)

 

I hope that help.

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  I know Chad and he is a skilled mechanic and a no bs guy. Slavole. Did I meet you in Kamloops before the DS event, you needed brake parts?

Edited by widebear

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I needed break parts (front caliper mount) a  month before the Loose Screw, it was for a work party.

The loop guys make us appreciate the A loop (still hangover) before going to work, It was one of my hardest ride ever.

 

I didn't say Chad said bullshit.

Changing the Chain and valve guide was for sure a good preventive advise.

As a mechanic, when a guy like me who want the warranty everything last, better change the parts who are the most likely the one who can fail.

 

Anyway, I was concerned about the valves and everything was fine.

After the job was done Chad told me, the full head is cheaper to replace than changing the Valves, springs etc. 

Good to know, next time I'll wait the bike stop and need a full rebuild. (that was a 1000$ job, for nothing and no reason, except make me feel safe)

Learning as a price .

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Thanks for all the background info slavoie.

 

Good luck with your sale.

 

Cheers,

Chris 

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