Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Will a 2014 YZ250 shock fit a 02 YZ250?

Recommended Posts

Someone else can chime in if I'm wrong. I think it will. But unless yours has suffered damage a revalve or rebuild will do more than just a new shock. I don't think they have changed much over the years like the forks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes. 2002-16 are all interchangeable. Even more room on the 2002-04 steel frame.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only a larger 18mm shaft but doubt that is enough to make much of a diff. A revalve/re-spring and rebuild like others have said is better than just blindly buying another used shock that probably also needs a revalve, rebuild, and re-spring.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only a larger 18mm shaft but doubt that is enough to make much of a diff. A revalve/re-spring and rebuild like others have said is better than just blindly buying another used shock that probably also needs a revalve, rebuild, and re-spring.

actually.. its a brand new (unused) 2014 shock.. reason I'm interested is ,Ill be sending in my 02 shock for re-valve and I'm sure it will need lots of rebuild parts.. I figure the brand new shock(under$400) will offset the costs of all the rebuild side costs and if it's a major upgrade like the SSS forks it would be in my best interest to get the new one revalved as Im already going to do that anyways.... fitment is my main concern.. hell I even need new end bearings on my old shock.. those pivot works bearings dont last long at all... Spring is a 4.7 i currently run a 4.8 .........And I really appreciate all input on this matter!!!

Edited by Snider
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI, no lower shock bearing lasts long.  Someone experimented with a solid bushing a while back; maybe delrin.  I can't imagine that worked very well either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The reservoir is also larger on the '06+ shocks. (And they're anodized gold!)

 

Curious thing about the 18mm shaft; the larger surface area of the shaft created greater stiction, something some riders were able to recognize. I understand some suspension tuners were swapping out the 18mm shaft & cap for the older 16mm parts in order to get a livelier-feeling rear suspension. Yamaha switching back to a 16mm shaft on it's latest shocks seems to lend credence to that idea.

 

Good luck on your quest, Snider. Keep us updated with what you do.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Snider the 18mm shocks came out at a time (10 years ago) when bigger was considered better. At least for marketing purposes. Bigger cartridges means bigger pistons and shims. This Yam 2005-16 2-stroke shock has the bigger shaft and not the bigger piston and shims. So it's a weird beast.

The diam of the piston must be in proportion to the shaft volume to get a "balanced" flow of oil over the main piston and through the comp adjuster piston. In the 4 strokes in 2014+ Yam went back to the 16mm shaft last seen on the MX bikes in 2004. The 16mm shaft is certainly lighter, it has less seal stiction, and it means that for the same stroke distance less oil flows through the comp adjuster and more actually flows over the main piston.

If you go with the 18mm shock, it'll still need to be re-valving to work well for off-road or for rough MX tracks. Plenty of suspension shops could do that for you.

The reduced weight and seal stiction is nice, but mostly I found the 16mm shock easier to re-valve and feel what made sense when riding/testing. I ended up using a 2007 body (large res and maybe better anodising inside) with the 16mm shaft and original clevis.

A rebuild kit for one of these shocks is pretty cheap. I think mine is a Pivot Works kit which included a complete seal head assembly. It was about $60 including a new bladder (which I couldn't use in the large res), and I've done nearly 200 hrs on it with no probs. However I'm pretty careful to clean, dry and re-oil the shock shaft after every ride.

With the larger gas res, and the smaller 16mm shaft there is less air-spring effect on full stroke hits, so it has the effect of making the rear shock feel a bit less progressive on bit hits. I like that. But it's personal preference.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very helpful,Thanks!... Looks like there's no big advantage to the newer shock so I'll just have my 02 re valved (again).. I was thinking they had redesigned the newer shocks to compliment the SSS forks . Oh well back to FC ... Thanks for all replys!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...