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Bullet Connectors & Crimp tool?

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I have one and like it. You must be careful to use it correctly for good results. You can also buy extra pieces if doing a lot of wiring.

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Trail Tech sells a nice little kit that includes both for $60.  Anybody thoughts on this or other connectors and tools on the market?  

IMO that looks like a quality tool and kit.

 

Then it really depends on how many connectors etc you need. Personally I have pretty cheap tool, then buy small packs of connectors for the correct connections and wire sizes as I need them.

 

For anything slightly exposed to water/moisture, I also use dialectic grease in the connectors and MAY use shrink tube over the connections. You can get buy water resist connectors with rubber boots but IMO I still use the dialectic grease

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I do the same but go one step further and solder the the connection after crimping; increases the mechanical strength of the crimp and seals the connection against corrosion.

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I do the same but go one step further and solder the the connection after crimping; increases the mechanical strength of the crimp and seals the connection against corrosion.

No... no it doesn't.  Crimp crimp connectors, solder solder connectors. 

 

What happens when you solder crimp connectors, the solder wicks into the wire and creates a weak point past the connector (towards the wire) where the connection will fail. 

 

Depending on the connector, you can heatshrink over the crimp after it's made which will add some mechanical support to the joint.  The adhesive-lined stuff is real good for that. 

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That seems like way too much money for a crimper and connectors.  My Craftsman crimper and a buttload of a variety of connectors doesn't cost half of that.

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Great info. The company I work for makes connectors (good) and crimpers (suck). Crimpers cost us $350 and you need Shaq hands to use them. My $35 NAPA weather pac ones do just as well if not better. Good to know where to get OE terminals. Thanks.

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Trail Tech sells a nice little kit that includes both for $60.  Anybody thoughts on this or other connectors and tools on the market?  

 

This kit is for uninsulated terminals that get inserted into connector blocks. If you're not building connector blocks, I think you'd get more use out of a kit with the standard insulated common terminal types and a simple crimper like this one from Ace.

 

http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=1378670

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This kit is for uninsulated terminals that get inserted into connector blocks. If you're not building connector blocks, I think you'd get more use out of a kit with the standard insulated common terminal types and a simple crimper like this one from Ace.

 

http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=1378670

Ya good point and I didn't look too close at the actual connectors.

 

And to repost I have an inexpense tool, then buy packs of the crimps depending on what I need them for.

 

I'm not an electrician but feel comfortable doing my own electronics/low voltage stuff . I have worked at an electrical wholesaler and you can spent l$$$$$$$ of cash on the T&B, Burndy, AMP tools and crimps.

 

I use something like the smaller tool in this pic

 

stakonbrand_600x275_zpsyvyjhl3d.png

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I like Deans style connectors. They have almost zero resistance, (bullet style is about the same but not quite as conductive) it's impossible to reverse the polarity when connecting them, and they do not require a special tool to crimp them. They are very easy to pull apart and are as waterproof as connectors get.

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I

 

No... no it doesn't.  Crimp crimp connectors, solder solder connectors. 

 

What happens when you solder crimp connectors, the solder wicks into the wire and creates a weak point past the connector (towards the wire) where the connection will fail. 

 

Depending on the connector, you can heatshrink over the crimp after it's made which will add some mechanical support to the joint.  The adhesive-lined stuff is real good for that. 

Well yes, adding solder to a wire will stiffen the wire and move the flex point up the wire to the end of the solder. A crimp on terminal also creates a flex point in the wire at the wire/terminal junction.

Proper design of wiring will reduce flexing so fatigue failure should not be an issue, however we don't always have environmental control of the operating enviroment, and solder does seal the joint for corrosion protection.

 

So the decision becomes one of the lesser of two evils; wire breaking from fatigue or mechanical/corrosion failure of the connection.

 

I've done the crimp/solder for decades on low current salt water marine wiring and never had any type of failure, mechanical or electrical, so I just continued with dirt bike wiring. Maybe overkill  for a dirt bike but I do a lot of riding in the wet PNW.  For high current marine I have a shop do the crimping with a hydraulic crimp tool and use special lugs with adhesive shrink tubing.

The adhesive shrink does a good job of supporting a connection, and I use it to protect splices, but it only provide water protection for one end of a lug terminal, unless you use special lugs with a closed end wire socket (Ancor makes them). 

If you want the best visit a large West Marine store or visit their online catalog. They also sell AWG gauge wire which has a 10% higher current rating than SAE gauge wire, and is tinned for corrosion protection.

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This kit is for uninsulated terminals that get inserted into connector blocks. If you're not building connector blocks, I think you'd get more use out of a kit with the standard insulated common terminal types and a simple crimper like this one from Ace.

 

http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=1378670

I'm not sure I understand - From my experience the connectors used/associated with that tool don't marry up well to the OEM Japanese style bullet connectors on my xr400.  I actually used that exact tool (and associated connectors) when I originally did the dual sport wiring on my bike and now, two years later, I'm getting back to cleaning up all those connections so they are japanese bullet connectors through-and-through so the connections are better - Can you explain more clearly what you mean and specifically regarding connector blocks?

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I always solder after I crimp. I flow the solder up inside the wire insulation. I also know many do not have he correct soldering station or skill set to do this properly. Many of my friends in NJ worked for defense contractors and a few were military grade solderers. They taught me a lot. It is like welding. Anyone can pick up a MIG and stick two pieces of metal together. It takes skill to make it beautiful. That comes with the right tools and practice.

 

I have never had a wire fail due to breakage when crimped and soldered like that. I have had crimp only fail. The shrink wrap is a good thing too. Ideally, what you want is the wire to get progressively more flexible as it leaves the terminal. Same reason a spring over a rubber line keeps it from over stressing and kinking. Solder flow up the wire too, slightly melts the insulation, making it more moisture resistant. I've seen more than one 'green' wire be black a inch up and then be broken.

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I'm not sure I understand - From my experience the connectors used/associated with that tool don't marry up well to the OEM Japanese style bullet connectors on my xr400.  I actually used that exact tool (and associated connectors) when I originally did the dual sport wiring on my bike and now, two years later, I'm getting back to cleaning up all those connections so they are japanese bullet connectors through-and-through so the connections are better - Can you explain more clearly what you mean and specifically regarding connector blocks?

Do you mean you cleaning up how the wires are crimped to the connectors, routing etc  or are you getting corrosion?

 

If your getting corrosion, dialectic grease.

 

When you get into actual connector blocks, you can direct wire and screw the wire to the block OR use the correct connectors ir male to female or ring connectors

 

Fuse blocks come to mind and there  are a lot of options

 

https://www.google.ca/search?q=fuse+block&biw=1110&bih=598&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwiWnJms7rnKAhUDxGMKHanYB94Q_AUIBigB#imgrc=XVggOLNz4_Es4M%3A

Edited by filterx

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Do you mean you cleaning up how the wires are crimped to the connectors, routing etc  or are you getting corrosion?

 

If your getting corrosion, dialectic grease.

 

When you get into actual connector blocks, you can direct wire and screw the wire to the block OR use the correct connectors ir male to female or ring connectors

 

Fuse blocks come to mind and there  are a lot of options

 

https://www.google.ca/search?q=fuse+block&biw=1110&bih=598&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwiWnJms7rnKAhUDxGMKHanYB94Q_AUIBigB#imgrc=XVggOLNz4_Es4M%3A

Yeah, I'm only talking about cleaning up how the wires are crimped to the connectors, not the corrosion.  There are no connector blocks in the picture, just bullet connector connections, some of which are ugly because I initially combined the OEM Japanese style connectors with those crappy ones from the auto store.  I'm just wanting to do it right and change them all over to the Japanese Style bullet connectors.   Now that you guys mention it though, I will include the dialectic grease on the connections to avoid corrosion.

Edited by DiscoJV
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I've encountered the same issue of using SAE conector with J metric.  The metric bullets are sized different than OEM so I buy metric connectors. 

 

http://www.cycleterminal.com/bullet-connectors.html

 

http://www.cycleterminal.com/motorcycle-connectors.html

 

http://www.vintageconnections.com/ConnectorKits.htm

 

The factory crimps are very difficult to replicate so get a good crimping tool.

 

And I also use dielectric grease on the pin side of connectors and the spark plug boot, keeps moisture out and reduces corrosion. Available at auto parts stores.

You can also silicon seal the back side (wire side) of connectors. 

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