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Talon Hub lose Bearing fix punch/ Loctite help

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Hi all,

 

I replaced the bearings front and rear on my cr250 with talon hubs this weekend.

 

The rear was no problem, the front non disk side bearing was a little loose, I tried the, make a few burrs with a punch and I used RED LOCTITE, the bearing seems to fit better.

 

My question is, I could have made the burrs bigger and used a retaining compound like 609,641 etc.

 

Should I take it apart and re-do it this way?

 

I will get a new front wheel at somepoint this just needs to hold for a week long trip.

 

thanks guys.

 

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I would read the spec sheet for whatever adhesive you are using. If I recall correctly most retaining compounds may be rated stronger but are also meant for tighter clearences. So what's best really depends on how loose it is.

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It'll work for a little while. It'll oval out the bearing bore over time, but it shouldn't fail catastrophically. If you want to, you can pull the bearing, measure it and the bore, and decide if a retaining compound would work.

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It'll work for a little while. It'll oval out the bearing bore over time, but it shouldn't fail catastrophically. If you want to, you can pull the bearing, measure it and the bore, and decide if a retaining compound would work.

It fits kinda snug, still needs to be tapped into the bore.

I intend to use loctite 680.

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You really need to measure it, with a caliper, there's a couple retaining compounds depending on clearance.

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You really need to measure it, with a caliper, there's a couple retaining compounds depending on clearance.

 

to be honest I do not have an accurate enough way to measure the hub, the bearing sits pretty far in and I cant get the caliper to measure where the outer race of the bearing will rest.

 

I bought both 609 and 680, 609 works up to .008 gap and 680 works up to .012 gap.

 

any suggestions ?

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Try inserting the bearing along with a .0015 or .002 feeler gauge blade.  By the sound of it, you won't be able to.  The problem with using the 680 in too small a clearance could be as bad as not using any. 

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Try inserting the bearing along with a .0015 or .002 feeler gauge blade. By the sound of it, you won't be able to. The problem with using the 680 in too small a clearance could be as bad as not using any.

I was having the thought that the 680 might expand and push the bearing out or off center

Maybe I should just make a few extra burrs and use 609.

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What is that and how do I do it?

Apparently it's fallen out of favor with new manufacturing tolerances. So I can't find a video, but pretty much, you hit the (in this case) hub, just outside of the bearing with a punch. Attempting to fold the hub material over the edge of the bearing at a few spots, so the metal is then holding the bearing tight. 

 

This picture shows the idea, but you can use a punch instead of this really cool radial staking tool.

 

9-7.gif

It'll look something like this.

 

RearWheel56.jpg

 

Just like this one, but on the outside of the bearing.

 

TM-5-4210-230-14P-1_202_2.jpg

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dont know how much of a play your have but on my rear wheel i had on the caliper bearing so much bearing tolerance of the hub bearing race that i cut a stripe off an aluminum can of coke that was covering the whole bearing OD  - insert it into the hub race and then installed the bearing. never had a problem since but i'm doing mostly enduro riding not MX so I do not know if it would hold for that kind of use.

 

best would be the 609 compound with staking technique in your case as the tolerance is much less.

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I work in a machine shop and I would be shit with s ball of my own shit for punching a bearing journal. I would just use a bearing mount, if you want to work great get a shop to measure it for you they won't mind. Use the correct mount to suit the clearance and use the primer recommended.

keep in mind though you may need heat to get the bearing out next time.

Your only other option would be to sleeve the journal this may reduce hub strength though and would cost more.

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I work in a machine shop and I would be shit with s ball of my own shit for punching a bearing journal. I would just use a bearing mount, if you want to work great get a shop to measure it for you they won't mind. Use the correct mount to suit the clearance and use the primer recommended.

keep in mind though you may need heat to get the bearing out next time.

Your only other option would be to sleeve the journal this may reduce hub strength though and would cost more.

Thanks man, I'm going with the 609 as the bearing still fits fairly tight just not right enough I know that sounds stupid but it's the best way to describe it

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Thanks man, I'm going with the 609 as the bearing still fits fairly tight just not right enough I know that sounds stupid but it's the best way to describe it

probably the right choice those care nice hubs would be a shame to butcher them 609 should be fine for the application , just make sure its clean with a non oil based cleaner that will leave no film/residue for best results

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Update,

I decided to go a head and give this wheel my best shot fixing it.

I went around the entire bore with the the punch ( 1/16th in punch from Mcmastercarr.com) making an X shape like the #5 side of a dice, the middle punch mark was at roughly the center of where the bearing outer races height from the bearing seat. I gave the hub a pretty decent set of marks when I did it figuring it would hold the bearing tighter.

Then I cleaned the hub and bearing with acetone and rubbing alcohol.

Once the parts were clean I used Loctite 609 to lightly coat the hub and bearing outer race.

Note: I made sure to clean out the excess loctite on the bearing seat before driving the bearing in.

Drove the bearing in, it felt good going in, took a normal about of tapping force to go in. Like the original interference fit.

Let the wheel sit flat on the bench,treated bearing side up for 24 hours. The was all at room temperature.

Put the wheel back on the bike, the garage is about 32-40 degrees.

Installed the wheel had zero wobble or play and felt solid.

I feel confident this will hold up for a while possibly the season. I will post an update in a few months.

I plan on getting my OEM wheels laced up with nice rims once these bearings wear out.

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Loctite makes a bearing retaining compound for just about every situation.  After researching all of them, I used 641 on the drive-side rear hub based on my clearance and what I thought were acceptable shear and compressive strengths.  After a season or more of riding, everything is still tight.

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After a week of hard off-road riding the wheel is holding up great with no play at all, about 20 hours of ridding

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Did you buy the hubs new? If you did I would send them back & get the ones that meet factory specs, All of these fixes listed are going to fail, been there, done that. Good luck!

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