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WD40 on engine for storing outside?

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My buddy (and also read on the forums) suggested I throw some WD40 on my bike to keep things from rusting. I just got a '14 350exc which feels like a sin for keeping it outside in the rainy season.. The bike is well taped but condensation does raise up and get  on the bike. is WD40 a good idea to prevent rust? If so what should I or shouldn't I spray it on? 

 

thanks

-chris

 

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My buddy (and also read on the forums) suggested I throw some WD40 on my bike to keep things from rusting. I just got a '14 350exc which feels like a sin for keeping it outside in the rainy season.. The bike is well taped but condensation does raise up and get  on the bike. is WD40 a good idea to prevent rust? If so what should I or shouldn't I spray it on? 

 

thanks

-chris

it is indeed a sin to keep that bike outside, but if you had space inside you wouldnt have posted this, my suggestions would be to place a big tarp on the ground and roll the bike over it, so no condensation can come up, and the wd40 thing will work, but you have to pretty liberal with how much you use, the bike should be dripping it when your done, drain the gas if you dont plan on riding it. it will be alot easier getting new gas rather cleaning your fuel system. basically tarp your whole bike off and it will be fine.  

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it is indeed a sin to keep that bike outside, but if you had space inside you wouldnt have posted this, my suggestions would be to place a big tarp on the ground and roll the bike over it, so no condensation can come up, and the wd40 thing will work, but you have to pretty liberal with how much you use, the bike should be dripping it when your done, drain the gas if you dont plan on riding it. it will be alot easier getting new gas rather cleaning your fuel system. basically tarp your whole bike off and it will be fine.  

 

 

Yeah theres a lot of stairs to get up inside the house so this is my only solution, might get a van and just leave it in there however then I'd have to keep pressure on the forks all the time (tie downs) 

 

Adding a tarp underneath sounds like a good idea to prevent the raising condensation. 

 

Oh and the bike gets ridden every weekend (rain or shine) so the gas is fine and WD40 would get applied after every ride/wash

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Just remember WD40 is a water dispersant so it makes sense to spray it in tight areas where there are steel parts to expel water after you wash it.  But I think coating it till it's dripping is excessive and will just leave drip stains wherever you are parking it.

 

Condensation or do you mean evaporation?  Or dew?  The trouble with a tarp is that it can keep water out but it can also keep water in.  So unless you are able to totally seal the tarp from rain then the tarp may be trapping the water inside.

 

I used to keep my bike in an open air carport.  If it was windy when it rained then my bike would get wet.  I covered my bike in a breathable water repellent cover like this one.  The bike was on concrete so any water would drain away.  If your bike is on dirt then I would recommend laying down some pressure treated plywood.  After washing I would use WD40 on my chain and wipe clean.  I would then spray the various nooks and crannies with WD40 and then wipe clean (don't forget you spoke nipples!).  WD40 should be safe on most metal parts (if you spray and wipe) and is not necessary on plastic parts (and do not spray your seat or grips!).  In the winter I would remove my chain and keep it in a container of ATF since my bike would not be ridden for a few months.  This ritual kept my bike rust free (at least from what I could see).

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I'd worry more about it getting stolen than rusty.

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Oh and some alternatives to tie downs are:

  1. Bike shoe
  2. P-lock
  3. Risk Racing Lock n Load
  4. I recall seeing some people putting up postings of pictures where they used a hook and eye turn buckle.  the eye would go through the floor of the van and the hook would go through the foot pegs.  Basically, a DIY version of #2 and #3.

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I second the trailer or the small shed. I'm cheap but sometimes spending a few bucks for security and keeping your new bike from getting roached by the weather or stolen by some local kids is definitely

Worth it. Even a storage unit is better than nothing and may offer a bit

More security.

Edited by garce250sx
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I keep my street bike and dirt bike outside under my balcony so not exposed to direct rain BUT in the PWN it rains enough that everything gets moist..

 

Lots of way's to keep your bike secure and tarped (maybe even a cheap pop up and traps if you have room) but IMO really the only thing that is going to rust is the chain. I personally use Maxima MPPL lube on my chain after I wash it and before I lube or after a wet ride. You can use it other places as well like lubing cables. I like this better the WD40 since it doesn't seem as sticky.

 

max_10_mppl_lub_20oz.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

And maybe get a cheap electric leaf blower and dry the bike off good if its wet before you store under a tarp.

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I was literally in the same situation. No place to store my bike during the harsh winter in the northeast. After trying to come up with alternative storing methods, I just said the hell with it and grabbed a storage unit. One of the main reasons is the security. The facility is gated, with 24 hour surveillance on all the gates/buildings. I keep my bike and all my riding gear/ tools for maintenance there. I'm sure that's not everyone's ideal setup, but It worked out pretty well for me. Not having to worry about the bike is worth it to me.

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Yeah theres a lot of stairs to get up inside the house so this is my only solution, might get a van and just leave it in there however then I'd have to keep pressure on the forks all the time (tie downs) 

If you tie the front and rear wheels in place then you can leave the ties on the bars or subframe pretty loose. Bike will wobble around but not fall over.

Edited by Mr_Motocross

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Try this my friend: http://www.amazon.com/Boeshield-T-9-Waterproof-Lubrication-aerosol/dp/B001447PEK  Boeing aircraft have metal surfaces where they cannot use a lubricate or rust preventer so they engineered T9.  The Aerospace industry faces the same stuff we do on our bikes, only they are protecting much greater investments and they don't care about a consumer price point so what they make is feaking great stuff.  Not your average run of the mill walmart product.

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Oh and the bike gets ridden every weekend (rain or shine) so the gas is fine and WD40 would get applied after every ride/wash

 

You're over thinking it.  No need to worry with that frequent use schedule.  If you were storing it for several months, then it would be different.  About the only thing that is steel and prone to developing even a bit of surface rust in less than a week would be your chain and header.  Just make sure the chain is lubed after you wash it and take a Scotch Brite pad to the header if it get's ugly enough to bother you.

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So apply this to rust pro areas after every wash or does it built up a layer that doesn't wash off?

 

Try this my friend: http://www.amazon.com/Boeshield-T-9-Waterproof-Lubrication-aerosol/dp/B001447PEK  Boeing aircraft have metal surfaces where they cannot use a lubricate or rust preventer so they engineered T9.  The Aerospace industry faces the same stuff we do on our bikes, only they are protecting much greater investments and they don't care about a consumer price point so what they make is feaking great stuff.  Not your average run of the mill walmart product.

Edited by Treesner

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So apply this to rust pro areas after every wash or does it built up a layer that doesn't wash off?

I know it says it has wax as a component, but candidly, until I read that today, I never knew that and you wouldn't ever know it by using it.  I use it from the foot peg springs up.  It's flipping awesome stuff, but might be a bit pricey for what you are considering.  One of the previous responses was that there isn't a lot that can rust on the bike.  The OEM torx/hex bolts will start to show rust in time.  This will definitely stop that as will a generous dose of WD40.  You've gotten some great suggestions here so I'll add one relative to the theft concerns.  Consider placing a keyed lock on each rotor, and turn off the fuel.  If it's injected, you won't be able to do that of course unless you install a valve between the pump and the injector.  Amazing how many joy riding thieves have dropped bikes of friends of mine when they ran out of fuel, but they all had petcocks - no EFI.  Also, thieves can push a bike with the back tire skidding from a padlock, they can't do that if the front is locked.  Yes, they can bring bolt cutters, but they won't want to part with them if they are big enough/expensive enough to power past a good lock.  You can also flatten both tires.  All of this should be cause enough for the lazy b*stard to go elsewhere to steal something from someone else.  I ride with quite a few other guys and they all stopped laughing when I responded to their jab "they can still steal that you know" by telling them, I just want their bike to be easier to steal than mine!

 

Edit - Oh, and here's a link with better pricing. https://www.theruststore.com/Boeshield-T-9-12-oz-Aerosol-P3.aspx

Edited by Captn Kirk

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For the parts that take heavy pack grease: steering head, swingarm, shock pivots, hubs I feel like I wouldn't want to spray WD40 on them (wouldn't the WD40 break the grease down and clean it out?) could i put some squirts of chain spray on those areas? 

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IF you are using a good quality synthetic non-wax chain lube, it works great!  Use it all the time to penetrate axle bearings after I power wash.  Haven;t lost a bearing since but that may be because I have a wheel for every ocassion!

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