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I just got my xr cylinder back from the machine shop. They bored it out to a 66.5mm because it was out of round and had some nasty marks. Now my question is do i still need to hone it or should i just clean it with a scotchbrite? I have been hearing lots of different opinions on this.

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I just got my xr cylinder back from the machine shop. They bored it out to a 66.5mm because it was out of round and had some nasty marks. Now my question is do i still need to hone it or should i just clean it with a scotchbrite? I have been hearing lots of different opinions on this.

 

Always hone a freshly bored cylinder, It helps the rings seat properly, or your local town will hire you for mosquito fogging!

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Always hone a freshly bored cylinder, It helps the rings seat properly, or your local town will hire you for mosquito fogging!

So just hone and go?

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The most important thing you can do is clean that thing thoroughly with hot water and dish soap, then immediately lightly oil it.  If you just had it bored the machinist should have honed it to crosshatch it, you shouldn't need to do anything but clean it.

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The shop should of bored and honed the iron barrel sleeve to fit the piston. All part of the same job.

 

The scotchbrite you are thinking of is for nikasil (plated) aluminum barrels that you do not bore.

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I just got my xr cylinder back from the machine shop. They bored it out to a 66.5mm because it was out of round and had some nasty marks. Now my question is do i still need to hone it or should i just clean it with a scotchbrite? I have been hearing lots of different opinions on this.

 

 

Cj and Wiliam are correct, usually they do hone it. but if the shop said they didn't, then you should have it honed. Let's see a picture of the cylinder alexyz.

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Looking on google it seams to be honed but the lines are not quite as visiable

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Why not ask the machinist?  I have had numerous car and bike cylinders bored over the years, they have always been ready to go.  If it still needs to be honed you have a crappy machinist.

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You need to take your new piston to the machine shop and let them know how much clearance you need, they can hone it to fit. New piston should have instructions on how much clearance is required and where to take the measurement on the piston skirt.

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You need to take your new piston to the machine shop and let them know how much clearance you need, they can hone it to fit. New piston should have instructions on how much clearance is required and where to take the measurement on the piston skirt.

 

I assumed the machinist bored to fit a piston.  I have never, ever had a cylinder bored without the machinist having the piston.

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If you are not absolutely certain of what you're doing you probably shouldn't apply any abrasives to your cylinder bore.

 

I would be amazed if you got a cylinder back bored but not honed.  If you did you can't expect to just throw a hone on a drill and finish it.  Honing is done to ensure the bore is square, to set the final piston to cylinder clearance and to leave an oil retaining cross hatched pattern on the cylinder wall.  Honing is the most technical and important part of the job.  It must be done correctly.

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I agree and the machinist will hone to suit the rings used.  He/she should know based on the piston supplied.  The shop I use has done thousands of cylinders and is a piston dealer, and the hone is tailored to the ring material and intended use. 

 

+1 on cleaning and oiling right away to prevent rust until assembly.  When ready to assemble wash and scrub again, then wipe with a clean white rag using WD 40 until there is no dirt on the rag.

 

You should check ring end gap before assembly, will usually be OK but the risk from a wrong gap is too great to bypass this step. The machinist can do this in a few minutes.  Also ask him how to identify the top side of the rings, which one is top and second, how to assemble the oil control rings, and the clocking of ring gaps.

 

Piston/ring mfg should provide instructions on whether to assemble the bore/piston wet or dry. At least ask the machinist.

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Some people put them together dry.  I would never do that, but some people do.

 

Always lightly oil the bore, that's my two cents.

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