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Times you were stranded...

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Here is my list:

 

Happened in 1993 - CR500:  I had one of those insanely beefy Sidewinder chains (outside links had no beveling) snap and fall on the ground.  It didn't make a sound when it happened, and for a second I thought the transmission was stuck in neutral.  I had to walk about 2 miles back to my truck.

 

2010 - CRF450:  A rock hit my water pump cover causing all the antifreeze to drain out.  Once the radiator was completely empty, my bike started to smell like burnt epoxy, alerting me that something was amiss.  I traded bikes with my buddy and headed for my truck. Didn't have to push it at all, since I parked my bike on a service road.  Bike was fine after I changed the oil.

 

2011 - CRF450:  A rock hit my ignition cover causing all the motor oil drain out.  Once the engine was completely empty, the valve train disintegrated and the engine stalled.  I had to walk aproximately 5 miles in new motocross boots - ouch!  That really helped break them in though.  Yes, I finely purchased a much better skid plate with more coverage after this.

 

Place your stories of being stranded here!

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Back in the early Ninety's I had an 84 Cr-500, and I rode 2 miles away from my truck, I should have bought a spare plug, the beast fouled a plug leaving me stranded so i had to push it back in the hot Texas sun. My water pac was empty, i suffered heat stroke! All my fault.

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Back in 1985 I was riding my XR500R in the desert west of Tucson, it was summer, like 110*.  I ended up with the bike upside down wedged in a narrow wash with the bike on top of me.  Took me like 2 hours to get out of there, nearly died from the heat.

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Sorry for the long read, but it's a good one. It's a report I posted back in 2003.

 

 

Arrived Monday evening, Sept.1st, 2003 for a 2 day ride of Rampart. Tuesday morning rolled
in with beautiful weather. Hit the trails about 9am and quickly was reminded why I
like that place so much. Riding Rampart is better than any roller coaster I've ever
been on and what's more, I'm the one in control.
Started out on the easy trails, 682 and such, to get my Rampart groove going. I
found myself laughing out loud as I rode those sweeping, up and down, banked trails.

About 2pm I decided it was time for lunch and rode over to Sprucewood via 673 for a
burger. After lunch I rode to the Platte river via Russel Gultch. On the way back, I
opted to take 692 for as far I felt comfortable with. I couldn't remember what you
guys said was the best way to ride that trail, CW or CCW. So I went CCW. The route
in, I took the creek instead of the ridge. No problems. A little farther down the
trail is where it starts getting technical. As I come to each obstacle I determine
whether I think I can make it back the opposite direction if I have to, before going
thru it. I came to a section that was a succession of 3 good size rocky steps/ledges
that were about as far apart from each other as the wheelbase of your bike. Inspecting the line that existed from other traffic, it looked absolutely do-able
from the opposite direction. I did something similar in Moab just a month before.
So I went down it and pressed on to the next obstacle, a hard left to a deep rutted
climb that culminated in a root ledge with a tree right there. That took 2 tries to
clear. Then came a couple of sharp uphill switchbacks with huge roots. Cleared
those. Then came an uphill climb to try to get over what looked like a bunch of
huge, sharp, jagged edged molars burried in the ground. I tried it once and laid it
over near the top, almost losing it over the drop-off to the side. Nah, I thought,
that's all she wrote. I'm turning around right here. It's starting to get late and I
need to get out of there. This was about 6pm. Man, where did the time go? I must
have spent close to a half hour each on some of the more difficult obstacles.

On the way out, a short afternoon light rain came thru and wet the rocks just enough
to make them slick, something I had not considered. I get to that 3 step ledges and
hit the line I saw earlier and I wash out on the slick rock faces and lay it over. I
pick the bike up and try hitting it again at different angles trying to get up it,
but each time losing traction on the slick, wet rock and laying it over. I was dead
dog tired by now, and low on water after sucking it down all day. It was dark-thirty
by now and thought I had enough strength for one more try. Hitting it in the light
that only my headlight provided, I thought, maybe not being able to see it so well
will help me get up it by just "bulldoggin it" and goin for broke.

I get it as high as the front wheel over the 2nd ledge from the top and knew I was
done. At least it came to rest in a decent upright position. Didn't figure I'd get
it any farther than that, so that's where I left it. Now what to do?

It was looking like spending the night in the forest was an idea I had better start
coming to grips with. Taking stock of my situation, knowing how much water I had
left, which was only a few ounces, considering how far it was to hike out to
Sprucewood by trail, I took out a large garbage bag that I had in my backpack for
use as a makeshift rain slicker and huddled inside it, under a tree, for a few hours
of rest. During this time, I'm going thru my mind on what gear I'm gonna leave with
the bike. I decided to leave my helmet, elbow gaurds and boots. My boots because,
I've hiked in them before(Alpinestars Tech 8's). They're heavy and given my exhausted
condition and the trail conditions and distance I'll have to hike, I need my legs as
light as possible. That leaves just the Tech 8 booties and my socks between me and
the ground. But, fortunately I had put in a pair of gel insoles a while back. I was
hoping they would make all the difference.

At about 11pm I get up and decide to hike out as far as possible in the dark, having
a mental picture of the trail map. After about 2 hours, I made it a little past
where the ridge trail that parallels the creek trail, meet near the bottom and lost
the trail. Using my feet to try to feel for the banked edges of the trail, I knew
it must be right in front of me but I couldn't find it. With no
moon and only the stars and Mars to see by, I figured I could take a picture with my camera
using the flash, then look at the picture on screen to see the trail. The first time I
did that the bright flash blinded me and I couldn't see squat for several minutes. Next time,
I closed my eyes while taking the shot. I found the
trail but soon lost it again. I take another picture and check the screen to try
finding the trail again. On the screen I see what appear to be two red eyes peering
at me from behind a tree about 20 yards away. THAT'S IT! ........... I'M DONE!

It was now about 1am Wens. morning. I decided to go off trail a few yards and huddle
under a tree, inside my bag til sun up. It rained a few more times and it got cold enough to produce uncontrolable
shivering as I tried to stay warm. Wearing only a T shirt under my chest protector and backpack, I recognized the symptoms as initial hypothermia.

There sure are a lot of strange sounds out there at night. Got some rest but not much sleep, as my ears were in overdrive, taking stock of every leaf rustle, every
twig snap. Got up when it was light enough to see the
trail, about 6am, and headed out again. About an hour later I ran completely out of
water and was relagated to sipping the water droplets off tree leaves to stay
hydrated. As long as it took to get off 692 to where it meets Russel Gultch trail, I
thought trekking the rest of the way to Sprucewood was gonna take a long time. A little after 10am I heard car tires on pavement and knew I was close.

Got to the INN
shortly thereafter but she wasn't open yet. There were 5 riders visiting from Iowa
in the parking lot that were about to leave and asked me what I was up too. Thru an
almost non-existant voice, I told them the ordeal I'd just been thru and of my plans
to try to find someone with a 4 wheeler to take me back in there and help me lift
the bike over that last section of rock. First tho, I wanted to hitch a ride over to
Ramart road and FR507 where I was camped to get a change of dry clothes, socks,
water, food, and some rest.
The Iowan(sp?) riders weren't sure what they could do, if anything, after all, it
sounded like I had everything scoped out. They wished me well and took off back up
673. I went into the INN and the lady gave me 2 cups of ice water, which I promptly
downed, then she let me fill up my water bladder in my pack. I sat there on a barstool
resting for a little while then got up to head out to thumb a ride.

I just start to walk down Highway 67 and here come these same 5 Iowans back down 673 and
they stop me, saying they came back for me. Said they had gotten part way down the trail and stopped to discuss how their conscience was getting the better of them. They offered to either have me ride 2 up
with one of them and show them the way back to my bike and help me get it out or one
of them would ride 2 up with another and ride my bike out for me. Wasn't exactly how
I planned it but I wasn't about to turn them down. We decided it would be better for
me to go back with them since I knew exactly where the bike was.

I hopped on the back of a CR250 with a guy by the name of Richard and quickly
realized just how good a rider you must have to be to control any kind of bike,
riding 2 up, in that kind of terrain. I only got off when we got to the real
technical stuff like climbing Bear Mtn.. We arrived at my bike in what seemed no
time, compared to hiking it. I proceeded to put my boots back on as these 5 guys
spent all of 5 seconds wrangling my bike up that last few rock faces. Then the
ribbing started, with things like, "What's the big deal? You couldn't do that?" We
all laughed. Got some pictures then mounted up and headed out of there. I biffed on
one of the last rocky obstacles out, mainly because I was still pretty beat and I
have a tendancy to try to bulldog my way thru an obstacle when I'm tired instead of
finessing my way thru it. We got back to Bear Mtn. and took a group shot. When we
made it back to Sprucewood, I looked at my odometer, 10 miles from where I was stuck to the Inn.  I offered to buy the guys lunch or something but they just wanted some ice water then to get back on the trails.  

I finished off a hamburger then headed back to camp via 673. I got cleaned up, dry clothes and
was in the sack by 5pm. Got up Thursday morn, broke camp and headed for home. I
didn't get to ride all the trails I wanted to but I consider any trip you make it
back home from in 1 piece and your motorcycle intact, a good one.

I want to thank 5 of my best new riding buds for helping me out of a "slick" spot. Three of them
work at the Midwest Performance Honda dealership in Keokuk, Iowa.

My thanks to:
Richard Johnson-Keokuk IA.
Bob Johnson-Hamilton,IL.
Wes Kendall-Blandinsville,IL.
Nate Johnson-Denver CO.
Dave Jackson-Keokuk,IA.

 

Forgot to add pics.

RR28.jpg

RR29.jpg

Edited by Trailryder42
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Back in the early Ninety's I had an 84 Cr-500, and I rode 2 miles away from my truck, I should have bought a spare plug, the beast fouled a plug leaving me stranded so i had to push it back in the hot Texas sun. My water pac was empty, i suffered heat stroke! All my fault.

You'll never catch any Maicos, if that sucker fouls plugs!

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Not so much a distance thing but back in the 80's in Cape Cod MA our trails were connected through cranberry bogs. In the Fall they flood the bogs to harvest the berries. Well this one road was part under water and had a gnarly bump under one section. Best way through was on the gas with front wheel off the ground and I must have passed through the same spot 10 times that day with no issues. As it got dark (and colder) we were heading back and on my last time through I went over the bars! Bike went under water at WOT in the bog right next to the road. Seemed like an eternity for my buddies to bring my van back from my house to pick me up. Shivering violently I was glad the heat was on in the van.

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Last spring I fouled a plug in my KX250. Had wrong plug (heat range). Pushed for miles until we stole the plug out of my wife's cr80. Finished the trail at warp speed. Was almost ready to have the DNR get me out of there. Never again ride without a spare plug except for a track, never had another issue either.

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I've only been stranded with broken bones. Twice.

 

Scared myself plenty of times. One mile in one hour?

 

Prepared or lucky? Don't know.

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Stranded plenty of times where I had to call and ask for a truck to meet me at an exit point with a busted bike, but I have been pretty fortunate. A few time I have went over the bars and winded myself always having that few minutes lying on the ground assessing if anything is broken. Any times I had real problems or injuries, I had people riding with me fortunately.

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Stator on my Kato went out about 20 miles from the trucks. Luckily most of it was downhill so the other guys could keep riding while I pushed my bike back. Finally was able to bump start it on a big hill and rode the rest of the way back in a hurry.

 

Riding in the mountains can either really help or hurt you if you have a severe mechanical problem. In that case, there was about a 2k' descent to the trucks, I could have coasted most of the way there. If you park high and ride down, you can really get 'effed. Luckily I keep the important stuff on my bikes in good shape, so that's the closest I've been to being stranded.

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Don't know if this counts but I am currently stranded. Not on my bike but bike related. We are on our way to the AMA National Banquet. Left southeast pa at 2:30 pm. 7 hour drive to Columbus OH. Weather man said the winter storm was supposed to start at 9pm in Pa. Prefect, we will be in OH by then.

Well, storm started early. We are currently 3 hours and 45 minutes from the banquet and we have been in the truck since 2:30 pm and it is now 2:30am. The turnpike is shutdown. We have been sitting in the same spot for 6 hours. They sent firefighters out to do a welfare check on everyone. They said the back up is approximately 20 MILES LONG! They have no idea how long it it's going to take to get us out of here. We are figuring sometime in the morning. Going to be a long night.

My son got second in the nation this year in his class. He is super excited to go to the banquet. I really hope we make it there in time. Well, back outside to clean the truck off. It's snowing at least 2" an hour here. FML!

I''ll update you on the extent of the stranded as it progresses, lol.

Edited by YZPaGuy
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You'll never catch any Maicos, if that sucker fouls plugs!

 

Haaaaa, Target acquired, zapppppp the Honda! lmafooo.  Your new name is radar! bleep, bleep, bleeeeep! It spit a plug when they started putting that mptbe crap in the gas.15751855-radar-screen.jpgpic_see02.jpg<<<<<<<mx vet!

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I was once on my rm 85 riding and was low on gas so I took the "quick way" home and ended up falling over in a massive mudpuddle and sinking the bike completely underwater losing the rest of the gas in it. I was riding by myself and I was the only kid in grade 10 with out a cell phone so I had to push my bike 2 and a half hours to a friends house between trails and the side of the highway...

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