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Oregon Anti-fog goggles and the PNW

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I've looked at some threads on this before, but I would like input from guys in this area as our version of moist conditions is quite a bit moister than other areas. Even the Snowmobile guys from other areas may not appreciate the humidity we ride in.

I took some cheap goggles and drilled several 1/8" holes in the lens and also removed some foam. I dont think this helped much. So I'm gonna remove the lens and put screen material in it to have some conditions-are-so-bad-last-ditch-before-you-just-yank-them-off goggles. But it would be nice to have a decent set of goggles I could wear up to that point.

Double wall, trick coatings, what's the skinny?

Thanks!

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Our local technique for Walker Valley is to buy $15 crap goggles and remove all the vent foam. Top and bottom. Eventually if it's too wet, there's no trick. Just put them backwards on your helmet.

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Lol. Yeah, I've tried all sorts of things. Removing the foam may do more harm than good I realize. When you get hot, the heat rises and if you remove the foam below the steam goes directly up and into your lense. When moving the removal of the foam may help, but not stationary.

I have recently bought the fox tyrant goggles, and paid extra for the super anti fog lense. I have yet to ride with them, only snow skiing, which I did today. They worked well, but still..... Realize that I ski using an mx helmet. One prob with a mx helmet is the mouth guard traps steam, condensation, humidity and the it rises into the goggles.

So, the answer might be simple. Get a helmet without the chin protector for wet/winter conditions?

I did ride tahuya a few times recently with a shoie helmet, 100 percent goggle, high end upgrade lenses with anti fog. After only twenty minutes, couldn't see out of them. So, swapped out the lenses for my drilled out clear Swiss cheese single panes and added a layer of no fog spray. And that ....actually worked!

Next time I'm in tahuya the entire day will be spent on this eyewear thing. I've also put 6 small drill holes in some clear motorcycle safety glasses. I got three choices now, lots of lenses, and I'll also bring a couple anti fog solutions too. If you see a mad scientist at tahuya the next coming months....it's me.

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I've looked at some threads on this before, but I would like input from guys in this area as our version of moist conditions is quite a bit moister than other areas. Even the Snowmobile guys from other areas may not appreciate the humidity we ride in.

I took some cheap goggles and drilled several 1/8" holes in the lens and also removed some foam. I dont think this helped much. So I'm gonna remove the lens and put screen material in it to have some conditions-are-so-bad-last-ditch-before-you-just-yank-them-off goggles. But it would be nice to have a decent set of goggles I could wear up to that point.

Double wall, trick coatings, what's the skinny?

Thanks!

 

You have at least tried the basic DUAL pane lens in your goggle right? Get just the dual lens at dealer or online. they work just like dual pane house windows ( cold outside/warm inside).

 

Joe

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I use a quick strap so it is easy to take them off when stopped. I generally have no fogging issues when my bike is moving, just when stopped or working a gnarly hill. Safety glasses are also cheap and easy to remove when stopped. I removed the foam one time and then they really fogged up.

Edited by rolliew
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Great thread going here. 

 

I've tried every sort of complex lenses. Essentially, they can only do so much. 

 

Obviously, when you are stationary heat rises, and if there is moisture in the air it creates fog. So, removing the bottom foam layer is asking for trouble. 

 

A chin bar makes matters worse, but are you willing to give up that safety element?

 

I've read that the anti fog lenses specifically state that the no fog solution will destroy the no fog properties on the lenses?

 

I think the "quick strap" is probably a no brainer. Certainly when conditions are wet, damp, foggy, like they are right now in the PNW. 

 

Any helmet makers have a chin bar that either breathes really well, or is adjustable somehow?? 

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Our local technique for Walker Valley is to buy $15 crap goggles and remove all the vent foam. Top and bottom. Eventually if it's too wet, there's no trick. Just put them backwards on your helmet.

 

As mentioned in another thread, people have had serious eye damage or lost an eye from that. Just the though of that.... no way I'd ride in a forest with stuff that could make me lose an eye. 

 

I'm going to experiment with some safety glasses in the next few weeks. See if I can come up with something that would help when goggles are too much, but still protect the eye. I'll try drill holes, cat crap....

 

One thing I did notice too. If things get bad with your goggles, it helps to stop and thoroughly wipe out your lenses inside and out so they are dry. They might just be fine after that. So, I started keeping a good cloth on me for that.

 

Anways, it's fun to experiment and I'm looking forward to finding my ultimate wet/cold riding gear set up.

 

In the mail I've recently got these cool Neoprene gators by Pro Line, and also the Iron Man neoprene swim socks. I tried the socks on, and the body temp zooms up on them really fast. I'm dying to try all this gear out.   

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As mentioned in another thread, people have had serious eye damage or lost an eye from that. Just the though of that.... no way I'd ride in a forest with stuff that could make me lose an eye. 

 

I'm going to experiment with some safety glasses in the next few weeks. See if I can come up with something that would help when goggles are too much, but still protect the eye. I'll try drill holes, cat crap....

 

One thing I did notice too. If things get bad with your goggles, it helps to stop and thoroughly wipe out your lenses inside and out so they are dry. They might just be fine after that. So, I started keeping a good cloth on me for that.

 

Anways, it's fun to experiment and I'm looking forward to finding my ultimate wet/cold riding gear set up.

 

In the mail I've recently got these cool Neoprene gators by Pro Line, and also the Iron Man neoprene swim socks. I tried the socks on, and the body temp zooms up on them really fast. I'm dying to try all this gear out.   

I would think that goggles without the upper or lower foam would still provide more protection than a pair of safety glasses. At least the goggles have the surrounding foam against your face and the strap to positively secure them in case of a tumble, whereas the safety glasses don't have a positive restraint and could (potentially) come off in the instance of a tumble. Of course a fall can be bad enough to strip the goggles off, but I would think they are still more likely to stay in place when compared to safety glasses. And stick jammed into the face opening of a helmet is going to do some damage, regardless of the type of eye protection. But I wear goggles without the foam more often as I have had better luck than with safety glasses.

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I sweat a LOT! Could have something with my name. I have tried many different goggle, lens, and no fog spray combinations with little success. I prefer goggles but once the fog wins ( it always does in the winter) I go with the safety glasses. Better than nothing and they need very little airflow to stay clear.

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I sweat a LOT! Could have something with my name. I have tried many different goggle, lens, and no fog spray combinations with little success. I prefer goggles but once the fog wins ( it always does in the winter) I go with the safety glasses. Better than nothing and they need very little airflow to stay clear.

🤣

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I sweat a LOT! Could have something with my name. I have tried many different goggle, lens, and no fog spray combinations with little success. I prefer goggles but once the fog wins ( it always does in the winter) I go with the safety glasses. Better than nothing and they need very little airflow to stay clear.

Tried the goggle fan as well. It may have helped but was definitely not a solution. Edited by Fat Tony

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