2-Stroke Yamaha Models

Hey all, I am new to the snow mobile / machine world. Don't know anything about them. I come from the ATV / Motorcycle world. My brand of choice is Honda, but I know Honda never made anything for the snow. My second go to brand is Yamaha and I know they are in the snow business. My question is... Did Yamaha ever make a 2-Stroke snow mobile? If so what models are good to buy used? I am just looking for a single seater sport model. Just looking to have fun with it during the Winter months. All input is appreciated.

Hey all, I am new to the snow mobile / machine world. Don't know anything about them. I come from the ATV / Motorcycle world. My brand of choice is Honda, but I know Honda never made anything for the snow. My second go to brand is Yamaha and I know they are in the snow business. My question is... Did Yamaha ever make a 2-Stroke snow mobile? If so what models are good to buy used? I am just looking for a single seater sport model. Just looking to have fun with it during the Winter months. All input is appreciated.

Looks like the snow boards here on TT are a bit quiet.... Since I didn't hear from anyone, I started looking around on the Net for Yamaha 2-Stroke sleds. I found that Yamaha made a bunch of 2-Smoke snow machines for years, but only make 4 bangers now.

The Yamaha gas mixers that seem to be quite popular are the 700 triples. One particular one that keeps coming up in my reading as a good option is the 99+ SRX 700. Seems like they are fast, reliable and last a long time. Anyone on here have experience with an SRX 700 or other Yamaha 700 triple sled?

I seem to remember the SRX being a higher performance sled with triple pipes and exhaust valves. Some of them had crank problems, but this may only affect certain years - I'm not sure. The regular 700 had a single pipe and was an excellent motor. Most of my old sleds are the fan cooled twins like the Phazer; easy to work on and pretty reliable for cheap.

I seem to remember the SRX being a higher performance sled with triple pipes and exhaust valves. Some of them had crank problems, but this may only affect certain years - I'm not sure. The regular 700 had a single pipe and was an excellent motor. Most of my old sleds are the fan cooled twins like the Phazer; easy to work on and pretty reliable for cheap.

Thx for the comment Doug. I didn't realize the SRX 700 had triple pipes. I guess that would really help with overall performance. I believe the year the SRX700 had crank problems was 98. From what I understand Yamaha covered the fix of that issue in a recall. Most of the 98's out there should have gotten fixed, unless the owner was just lazy about bringing it in. I have heard the Phazers are good sleds. So kudos! I am just a brand loyal guy and want to stick with Yamaha. I think I will keep my eyes open for a clean 99+ SRX700.

The sweetest sound in the sled world is the two stroke triple, good luck in your search! Only downside is how much they weigh, so avoid getting stuck with one...

The sweetest sound in the sled world is the two stroke triple, good luck in your search! Only downside is how much they weigh, so avoid getting stuck with one...

Thanks Doug. I don't know what it is, but to me every two stroke motor sounds beautiful. Three 2-Smoke cylinders banging away... Thats got to be one awesome sound!

Before you get brand-loyal (especially just starting off riding), figure out what kind of sled you want.  Mountain? Trail? Crossover? Utility?  Figure that out, set a budget (Don't forget about gear/equipment) then start shopping from there. 

Yamaha did make 2t sleds for a while, don't anymore.  As a result, their lineup is real heavy and I rarely see them in the mountains without boost.  Triples make power, but they can be a real bitch to tune and get running right.

 

I've stuck with Polaris because I've got $$$ in parts/tools for them, switching brands would mean I'd need to replace a lot of those items.

 

Another factor, what do your friends ride?  Are any of them good at repairs?  Being a new rider, having a friend that knows a thing or two about the machine is nice when something goes wrong.

Before you get brand-loyal (especially just starting off riding), figure out what kind of sled you want. Mountain? Trail? Crossover? Utility? Figure that out, set a budget (Don't forget about gear/equipment) then start shopping from there.

Yamaha did make 2t sleds for a while, don't anymore. As a result, their lineup is real heavy and I rarely see them in the mountains without boost. Triples make power, but they can be a real bitch to tune and get running right.

I've stuck with Polaris because I've got $$$ in parts/tools for them, switching brands would mean I'd need to replace a lot of those items.

Another factor, what do your friends ride? Are any of them good at repairs? Being a new rider, having a friend that knows a thing or two about the machine is nice when something goes wrong.

SnowMule - Thx for the post. Honestly I am just looking for a sport type sled. Something I can be fast and nimble on. Unfortunately I don't have any friends that ride snowmobiles. The area I live in gets none or maybe one day a year (if we are lucky) of snow. Closest snow is almost 80 miles away. Thats probably the reason no one I know has a snow machine.

I heard the Yamaha SRX 700 triple is a beast and is very reliable. Unfortunately I have never wrenched on any snowmobile and don't know anything about triple cylinder engines. That said, I have wrenched on motorcycles and ATV's. The closest I have come to a triple is a Yamaha Banshee double.

It seems like a lot of folks like the Polaris sleds. I don't know about the design of Polaris sleds, but I owned a 94 Polaris Sportsman 400 2-Stroke ATV and that thing was a nightmare to work on! Tons of rivets, poor placement of components in the frame (hard to get in / out) and bad design all the way around. It was as if the ATV had been specifically designed so you would have to take it to the dealer to work on it. A buddy of mine had a newer Can-Am quad (Polaris company) that was exactly the same way. I don't want to buy a sled that is designed to be taken to the dealer when something goes wrong.

CanAm is a Bombardier product, unrelated to Polaris. 

 

Don't ride alone.  Find/make friends that ride.  (Especially important in the mountains, in avalanche terrain).

 

Driving to snow is probably something you'll do, a lot more than you expect to do.  I'll probably have 10k miles in the truck chasing the snow this year. 

 

Again, triples can be a bitch to tune.  Unless you know what you're doing with small engines, I'd avoid triples. 

 

Sounds like you're looking for a crossover-type sled, might take a look at the firecats if that's really what you're after.

CanAm is a Bombardier product, unrelated to Polaris.

Don't ride alone. Find/make friends that ride. (Especially important in the mountains, in avalanche terrain).

Driving to snow is probably something you'll do, a lot more than you expect to do. I'll probably have 10k miles in the truck chasing the snow this year.

Again, triples can be a bitch to tune. Unless you know what you're doing with small engines, I'd avoid triples.

Sounds like you're looking for a crossover-type sled, might take a look at the firecats if that's really what you're after.

SnowMule - Thx for the correction. You are correct, Can-Am is a Bombardier product.

I appreciate the advice on riding alone. I don't plan on doing that. I agree it's just too unsafe. I never ride alone on ATV's or motorcycles. I could probably meet some riders on here that would be able to meet up in my region.

I will check on the Fire Cats. Someone told me a while back they were good sleds.

Set a budget first. 

Out of that budget, buy good gear.  Jacket, pants, boots, knee/chest protection, helmet/goggles, pack, survival/rescue/recovery gear.  Some of the equipment you have for moto might work.

Then use what's left for the sled.

 

Winter's a lot less forgiving than summer is.  Should you break down or collide with something, you've not only got that injury/accident to deal with, but also weather/temp and visibility.  Having good gear (and the right gear - survival, firestarters, etc) can be the difference between making it out or ... not.

 

Same goes for avalanche gear/education if you're in avy terrain - it's not good enough to get that stuff piece-by-piece.  Need to have it all every time you ride, and have the skills to coordinate/execute a rescue should one of your riding buddies make a bad decision and get themselves in trouble.  (Throttle Decisions is one of my favorite videos, I use the 30min intro video in my avalanche presentations: https://vimeo.com/79814896).

 

All worth it though.  :thumbsup:

 

i-VxC4tpG-L.jpg

Set a budget first.

Out of that budget, buy good gear. Jacket, pants, boots, knee/chest protection, helmet/goggles, pack, survival/rescue/recovery gear. Some of the equipment you have for moto might work.

Then use what's left for the sled.

Winter's a lot less forgiving than summer is. Should you break down or collide with something, you've not only got that injury/accident to deal with, but also weather/temp and visibility. Having good gear (and the right gear - survival, firestarters, etc) can be the difference between making it out or ... not.

Same goes for avalanche gear/education if you're in avy terrain - it's not good enough to get that stuff piece-by-piece. Need to have it all every time you ride, and have the skills to coordinate/execute a rescue should one of your riding buddies make a bad decision and get themselves in trouble. (Throttle Decisions is one of my favorite videos, I use the 30min intro video in my avalanche presentations: https://vimeo.com/79814896).

All worth it though. :thumbsup:

i-VxC4tpG-L.jpg

SnowMule - Thx for the advice and video. All great info. I have a lot of gear for motorcycle and ATV riding, but no cold weather riding clothes. I do have emergency gear, so I think I am not far off from having everything I need. Now just need the most important piece... a sled! Haha

CanAm is a Bombardier product, unrelated to Polaris.

Don't ride alone. Find/make friends that ride. (Especially important in the mountains, in avalanche terrain).

Driving to snow is probably something you'll do, a lot more than you expect to do. I'll probably have 10k miles in the truck chasing the snow this year.

Again, triples can be a bitch to tune. Unless you know what you're doing with small engines, I'd avoid triples.

Sounds like you're looking for a crossover-type sled, might take a look at the firecats if that's really what you're after.

SnowMule - Looked at a 2000 SRX700 today with 1200 miles on it. Wasn't that impressed, to be honest. The sled looks like it was designed for the rider to be seated all the time. The guy was also selling a 2010 Ski-Doo 800 Summit. Now that looked like a fun sled! I might be more interested in either that one or something along those lines.

Sled technology has changed a LOT recently - engine power/performance, handling, suspension.
Likewise, riding styles have changed a bit lately too.  '05 and earlier were mainly sit-down machines, might stand up and rest a knee on the seat for what was considered 'extreme' riding then.

Today, the mountain/performance machines are designed for a rider-forward, standing-up aggressive riding style.  If you're resting a knee on the seat, you're riding wrong.

 

I still feel like you don't really know what you're looking for yet - SRX is sort of a trail/crossover machine, where the Summit is a mountain sled.  Two somewhat different riding styles (in motorcycles, think dualsport vs. desert).  Also going to be a big price difference between the two.

Sled technology has changed a LOT recently - engine power/performance, handling, suspension.

Likewise, riding styles have changed a bit lately too. '05 and earlier were mainly sit-down machines, might stand up and rest a knee on the seat for what was considered 'extreme' riding then.

Today, the mountain/performance machines are designed for a rider-forward, standing-up aggressive riding style. If you're resting a knee on the seat, you're riding wrong.

I still feel like you don't really know what you're looking for yet - SRX is sort of a trail/crossover machine, where the Summit is a mountain sled. Two somewhat different riding styles (in motorcycles, think dualsport vs. desert). Also going to be a big price difference between the two.

SnowMule - Thx for the reply. I am pretty sure at this point I want a rider-forward oriented type of snow mobile. Coming from the motorcycle world, I am used to standing a lot of the time. I also would like to stick with a two stroke. I prefer 2-Stroke motorcycles and quads mainly because of the power output and low weight of the motors. I also enjoy working on my own toys. Two-strokes are just so simple. Any suggestions on sleds other than the Ski-Doo summit?

I also like two strokes. I have seen few guys are adding 2 extra wheel  and a sitting chair beside their bike. They looks pretty well. But overall, I enjoy with 2 wheels so far.

srx were fast but were short tracks and too heavy for a mt sled or un groomed deep snow, op in Oregon so not sure where you plan to ride?  Improvement per year in sleds is huge compared to bikes so find the newest one in your price AND a model built specific to your use.

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