Heard a crack when tightening counter shaft bolt

This is my first post on this forum.

I purchased a 2003 DRZ 400S a few months ago.

I noticed that the counter shaft nut was lose and decided to try the locktite fix.

As I was tightening the counter shaft nut, I heard a slight 'crack'.......almost like the sound of a torque wrench clicking when it reaches the desired torque.

I wasn't using a torque wrench at the time, but I've torqued many things in my life and I know I was not tightening more than 105 ft/lbs.

After I heard that, I said 'oh crap' and stopped tightening.

I then go tout the torque wrench and finished torquing the nut to 105 ft/lbs.

My first question: Should I be worried about the slight crack I heard while tightening? Could I have damaged a bushing or gear inside the tranny?

My second question: If I should be worried, is there anything I can / should check before taking it out for a ride?

Thanks in advance for any help / advice.

ive heard of people actually busting the shaft .. if it free spins and you dont see anything just keep an eye on it ...

If it were me, I'd take it apart and inspect it closely. If the PO used an impact gun repeatedly in the nut or simply overtorqued it, you could have an issue, Since the potential failure could be expensive and keep you stranded, take another look just to be sure everything is OK.

Guessing it was in gear when you were tightening it? If so then there's possible gear damage, in future make sure it's in neutral. Also didn't Suzuki change the toque spec to 85? 

Edited by DRZ4Hunned

Maybe the PO had done some loc-tite-ing and you were hearing some of the old loctite cracking??

Wishful thinking...

A few misconceptiins - Tightening the nut in gear is risky and might damage the gear box. No. Tightening in gear using a torque wrench is not risky.  In gear or out of gear makes no difference.  Tightening in gear using an impact wrench  pounds on the engagement dogs.  I do not know if this is risky or not, I just don't do it.

 

Tighting or over tightening alone does not damage the 2nd gear bushing.  But when working on an old motorcycle where time and wear has taken its toll, you do want to verify the countershaft spins freely in neutral with the nut tight.

 

Suzuki did change the torque.  From 85 to 105. 105 ft lb is the current specification.

 

I have no idea about the crack sound.  If the nut torqued up OK and the shaft spins free, that is about all you can look for.

A few misconceptiins - Tightening the nut in gear is risky and might damage the gear box. No. Tightening in gear using a torque wrench is not risky. In gear or out of gear makes no difference. Tightening in gear using an impact wrench pounds on the engagement dogs. I do not know if this is risky or not, I just don't do it.

Tighting or over tightening alone does not damage the 2nd gear bushing. But when working on an old motorcycle where time and wear has taken its toll, you do want to verify the countershaft spins freely in neutral with the nut tight.

Suzuki did change the torque. From 85 to 105. 105 ft lb is the current specification.

I have no idea about the crack sound. If the nut torqued up OK and the shaft spins free, that is about all you can look for.

I had read about the not torquing in gear thing and it never really made sense to me why you shouldn't. Thanks for confirming my suspicions noble.

Check your socket. A cheap socket will crack and split.

Another thing to check would require removing the nut again and seeing if the threaded end of the drive shaft has broken. Older model drive shafts have a bigger hole in the end of them which makes the threaded part thinner and they sometimes break there. Putting the bike in gear, a high gear, keeps the shaft from turning to easy. Gives the needed resistance so you can apply torque for removal or install of the nut.

I have a 2003 KLX 400. I to did the loctite fix and felt / heard a click or something at full torque . Scared the crap out of me that i broke something . Never had a problem yet .

Another thing to check would require removing the nut again and seeing if the threaded end of the drive shaft has broken. Older model drive shafts have a bigger hole in the end of them which makes the threaded part thinner and they sometimes break there. Putting the bike in gear, a high gear, keeps the shaft from turning to easy. Gives the needed resistance so you can apply torque for removal or install of the nut.

Yes, there's an old thread with pics of both old/new shaft designs.

Search for it,

:thumbsup:

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