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Colorado Moving to Denver

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Hi Everyone,

        I'm moving to Denver, CO during April, and have been riding, mostly sand since I was a kid, even though I haven't rode during the last 4/5 years.

 

Have been looking around a lot, and seems like I'm getting to one of the best places on earth for dirt bike riders, so this is keeping me totally excited.

 

As soon as I get there, will try to find a bike to ride, probably a 250 2Strokes or a 250/450 4 strokes, and start looking for people to ride with during weekends.

 

There are a lot of things that I'm not yet familiar with, such us what's the best place to find used (good condition) bikes, as I've  only looked into craiglist so far.

I'll also definitely need to find a group/partners to ride with, and someone that can be my "mentor" for all the questions (which will be a lot, so that will be bothered on a daily basis) I'm sure I'll have as soon as I get there.

 

Have been looking for places to ride and seems like the options are endless so, I'm convinced I'm taking the right choice by moving there.

 

Well, wanted to introduce myself, and start talking with you, the experts on the area.

 

 

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Colorado is full. You should consider staying where you currently reside.

 

LOL...almost beat me to it.  To the OP....just shut the door behind you when you come and try not to tell other out of staters how great it is once you get here. 

 

You'll see what we mean.  You will be torn on whether you should share the news and pictures of your move out here to Colorado because you'll want to preserve all the goodness for yourself.  Story of my life (and many other natives) and its hard to keep a secret in the internet age.

 

Be sure to check out www.staythetrail.org and look at the places to ride.  Lots of options, but you'll want to get familiar with the motor vehicle use maps (MVUMs) as these are the golden source for what stuff is rideable and by which vehicle.  Unfortunately, slowly but surely, the riding areas are being limited and reduced.  Your best bet to avoid the myriad of conflicting rules is to convert your dirt bike to plated, that way you can ride anywhere in the state.

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Colorado is full. You should consider staying where you currently reside.

 

hahaha, I promise I'll keep quiet about this.  :thumbsup:

 

You can check out nctr, northern Colorado trail riders. They do group rides.

 

Thanks.

I'll look into this one too.

Saw that there are a few meetup groups, and have been looking at a group that meets at Rampart, if I'm not mistaken

 

LOL...almost beat me to it.  To the OP....just shut the door behind you when you come and try not to tell other out of staters how great it is once you get here. 

 

You'll see what we mean.  You will be torn on whether you should share the news and pictures of your move out here to Colorado because you'll want to preserve all the goodness for yourself.  Story of my life (and many other natives) and its hard to keep a secret in the internet age.

 

Be sure to check out www.staythetrail.org and look at the places to ride.  Lots of options, but you'll want to get familiar with the motor vehicle use maps (MVUMs) as these are the golden source for what stuff is rideable and by which vehicle.  Unfortunately, slowly but surely, the riding areas are being limited and reduced.  Your best bet to avoid the myriad of conflicting rules is to convert your dirt bike to plated, that way you can ride anywhere in the state.

 

I'm coming from too far, so be sure that nobody will join me on this. Just one single rider added to the amazing CO trails.

Staythetrail was one of the first pages I found when I started to look into this things around Denver (this was almost one year ago) so imagine how anxious I'm at this point.

 

Seems like there are lots of things that you have to keep in mind to make sure you stay out of trouble. I've been reading a lot about making the bike street legal (guess this is the same than plated) and this kind of things. There are some items that I still need to get a better understanding, and that may take me some time, due to my lack of knowledge on US and specially CO laws.

 

 

 

 

What about looking for good used bikes? It's recommended to by from owner or dealer? Is there a specific webpage where riders usually go to when looking for bikes, besides CL?

I'm coming from Argentina, and buying from a dealer here it's like suicide, but not sure about there, saw that there are tons of dealers and well maintained bikes, but, never know what are the mores of each place...

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hahaha, I promise I'll keep quiet about this.  :thumbsup:

 

 

Thanks.

I'll look into this one too.

Saw that there are a few meetup groups, and have been looking at a group that meets at Rampart, if I'm not mistaken

 

 

I'm coming from too far, so be sure that nobody will join me on this. Just one single rider added to the amazing CO trails.

Staythetrail was one of the first pages I found when I started to look into this things around Denver (this was almost one year ago) so imagine how anxious I'm at this point.

 

Seems like there are lots of things that you have to keep in mind to make sure you stay out of trouble. I've been reading a lot about making the bike street legal (guess this is the same than plated) and this kind of things. There are some items that I still need to get a better understanding, and that may take me some time, due to my lack of knowledge on US and specially CO laws.

 

 

 

 

What about looking for good used bikes? It's recommended to by from owner or dealer? Is there a specific webpage where riders usually go to when looking for bikes, besides CL?

I'm coming from Argentina, and buying from a dealer here it's like suicide, but not sure about there, saw that there are tons of dealers and well maintained bikes, but, never know what are the mores of each place...

 

Street legal is certainly nice to have. But I ride trails pretty much every weekend and my bike is not plated and it has never been an issue. (and i don't mean that I have never been caught - just that I haven't needed to ride roads to connect trails). Honestly I personally wouldnt worry about getting it street legal until you have been here for a while and know your new world a bit better.

 

All my friends who have been riding a long time and who ride trails with me are moving from bigger bikes (450 and the like) down to 250 bikes. Our trails in the mountain are tight. The desert in the winter loves big bikes at times but even so once you get onto the desert single track smaller more nimble bikes seem to do better (at least in my circles) than more powerful bikes.

 

One of my friends just picked himself up a brand new 2015 KTM XCF-W from Cycletrader for an amazing price from a dealer on the east coast. (I am jealous as I paid full list price when I got mine new). So you might want to check cycletrader in addition to craigslist.

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Yep, plated and street legal are the same things here in Colorado.

 

Have bought and sold all my bikes on CL...just gotta watch for the deals and jump on them when you see them

 

To educate you a bit on the street legal thing....its no problem to wait as you dont have to plate when you buy them.  But what I have see in the last 10 years or so, is that those areas closest to the front range (Denver, C Springs, Boulder, Ft Collines) are enforced more closely than in the more rural areas and there is more designated OHV (off highway vehicle) trailhead parking.  What this means is that 20 year ago, you used to just pull off the forest service road, unload on the side and then head down the road on motorcycles until you hit the trailhead, law enforcement is now patrolling the county maintained portion of the road looking for ATVs and motorcycles and giving them warnings or tickets.

 

Depending on the trail system, you might have sections of what i consider Forest Service roads (that should be available to OHVs), where the local law enforcement  has decided it has too much traffic and OHVs are not allowed (example, Rampart Range Road). So it can literally vary from city to city and county to county.

 

We have run into law enformcement on Webster Pass, Rollins Pass/Mammoth Gulch/Kingston Peak, Central City, Marshall Pass, 717, Taylor Park/Crested Butte, Ouray/Telluride/Silverton, Rampart Range, etc.  Once plated, you can literally ride right through town, get gas, get lunch, ride from the rental place, etc.  Just eliminating the potential law enforcement hassle has been a relief and opens up a lot more options for riding loops and contingency plans.  Of course, every time i was stopped before I plated my bikes, I was able to plead ignorance and talk my way out of it (politeness goes a long way) or got lucky that law enforcement had better things to do.

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All my friends who have been riding a long time and who ride trails with me are moving from bigger bikes (450 and the like) down to 250 bikes. Our trails in the mountain are tight. The desert in the winter loves big bikes at times but even so once you get onto the desert single track smaller more nimble bikes seem to do better (at least in my circles) than more powerful bikes.

 

One of my friends just picked himself up a brand new 2015 KTM XCF-W from Cycletrader for an amazing price from a dealer on the east coast. (I am jealous as I paid full list price when I got mine new). So you might want to check cycletrader in addition to craigslist.

 

Agree. My older brother has been riding all his life as well, and he is more into trails. A few years ago he moved from a WR450 to a WR250, and now to a GasGas 250 EC, and he seems to be pretty satisfied as it gets much easier with a lighter bike out there.

 

With regards of Cycletrader, I used to look to look there, but only sales close to Denver. Now that you say this I'll start looking countrywide to see if there are good deals. Guess that delivery is not a problem in the US.

 

Yep, plated and street legal are the same things here in Colorado.

 

Have bought and sold all my bikes on CL...just gotta watch for the deals and jump on them when you see them

 

To educate you a bit on the street legal thing....its no problem to wait as you dont have to plate when you buy them.  But what I have see in the last 10 years or so, is that those areas closest to the front range (Denver, C Springs, Boulder, Ft Collines) are enforced more closely than in the more rural areas and there is more designated OHV (off highway vehicle) trailhead parking.  What this means is that 20 year ago, you used to just pull off the forest service road, unload on the side and then head down the road on motorcycles until you hit the trailhead, law enforcement is now patrolling the county maintained portion of the road looking for ATVs and motorcycles and giving them warnings or tickets.

 

Depending on the trail system, you might have sections of what i consider Forest Service roads (that should be available to OHVs), where the local law enforcement  has decided it has too much traffic and OHVs are not allowed (example, Rampart Range Road). So it can literally vary from city to city and county to county.

 

We have run into law enformcement on Webster Pass, Rollins Pass/Mammoth Gulch/Kingston Peak, Central City, Marshall Pass, 717, Taylor Park/Crested Butte, Ouray/Telluride/Silverton, Rampart Range, etc.  Once plated, you can literally ride right through town, get gas, get lunch, ride from the rental place, etc.  Just eliminating the potential law enforcement hassle has been a relief and opens up a lot more options for riding loops and contingency plans.  Of course, every time i was stopped before I plated my bikes, I was able to plead ignorance and talk my way out of it (politeness goes a long way) or got lucky that law enforcement had better things to do.

 

Definitely make things easier. Will consider this and pretty sure will try to get it done. As zzsean said, probably not on day 1. Since it will take me some time to get familar with the area, but at some point, it makes your life much easier.

 

 

 

 

I've been reading on DMV, and ok, all conditions are fine, but the mirror? It makes the bike so ugly :(

Edited by rulo87

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Agree. My older brother has been riding all his life as well, and he is more into trails. A few years ago he moved from a WR450 to a WR250, and now to a GasGas 250 EC, and he seems to be pretty satisfied as it gets much easier with a lighter bike out there.

 

With regards of Cycletrader, I used to look to look there, but only sales close to Denver. Now that you say this I'll start looking countrywide to see if there are good deals. Guess that delivery is not a problem in the US.

 

 

Definitely make things easier. Will consider this and pretty sure will try to get it done. As zzsean said, probably not on day 1. Since it will take me some time to get familar with the area, but at some point, it makes your life much easier.

 

 

 

 

I've been reading on DMV, and ok, all conditions are fine, but the mirror? It makes the bike so ugly :(

 

you can use the $15 fold down mirrors that you can hardly see.  it's not like you can even see behind you with the short reach and the vibration.  the most effective mirror would be one mounted to your helmet like the bicycle riders do.

 

To be clear, you dont have to plate right away, but there are somethings you need to have in order to convert an offroad bike to plated.  Here is a link to the actual form that you will turn into the DMV after being inspected for compliance by the Colorado State Patrol.  It is form DR2686. CSP will also provide a completed form DR2704.

 

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/DR2686.pdf

 

Pay attention to this part at the top of the form:

Proof of Ownership must state the motorcycle is off-road by providing one of the following:

  • Manufacturer's Statement of Origin (MSO)
  • Bill of Sale (Notarized or Signed Under Penalty of Perjury)
  • Dealer's Invoice
  • Off highway Title
  • DR 2444 Statement of Fact, stating motorcycle has no odometer mechanism (if applicable) (a trip meteris not an odometer mechanism)

What this means is the MSO, or the Bill of Sale or the Dealer's Invoice must state that the motorcycle is for off-road use only.  I have the specific Penalty of Perjury language that must be included on the Bill of Sale as recommended by the Arapahoe County DMV office is that is something you need.

 

The reason that you need to know this now is when you purchase the motorcycle, you need to get your paperwork in order so that you have the ability to plate it later.

 

The last two items are recent additions that make it easier, but I am not certain how easily that will work.  If you buy a bike like a KTM that has an odometer, you cant use the DR2444 statement of fact form.  But if you buy something like a WR450F or something without an odometer then you can use the DR2444 form as proof that it is an off-road bike.  The Off Hwy Title is a new process that was put in place last year and I am unfamiliar with the provisions of doing that, but I believe you might be able to get an OHV title by registering the motorcycle at least once for an OHV permit.

 

Anyhow, DMV/county clerks used to be absolute sticklers for this and if you bought a motorcycle using just a bill of sale (which was very common here in Colorado), unless it indicated it was for off-road use with the seller declaring under penalty of perjury in the second degree on the actual bill of sale you were out of luck being able to plate it.  Frankly, the easiest and best way to ensure you can convert it and plate it is to get the MSO indicating it is for offroad use only.  I am surprised how many sellers fail to get this....or finance a bike and never follow up with finance company to ensure they pass it on to the owner once paid off.  Ensuring the seller has the MSO or a title when you purchase the bike is one way to make sure that it is paid off and the financing company doesn't actually have legal title/ownership of the motorcycle.  When sellers start doing a song/dance about why they don't have the MSO, I walk away from the deal unless they have some sort of paperwork/paper trail showing the entire chain of possession and that it hasnt been financed.

Edited by SilvFx

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Yep, I'm new to Co from Florida for about a year now. I now tell everyone this place sucks and there's nothing worthwhile to ride out here!!

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Welcome to CO.  At least you are a dirt biker. Lets for sure shut the door on the greenie types that think the trails are only for hiking, riding bicycles (don't get me wrong...I mtn bike too, so I'm not totally against the pedaling crowd) or for equestrians. A few more dirt bikers won't hurt and will give us more clout in the access battles.

 

Give some thought to a KTM 300. Light bikes with great power. They'll be hard to find used though...heck...they're hard to find new!

 

Where will home be?  If you'll be on the south side of Denver perhaps we could hook up for some mid-week local rides. It'd work from the north end of town too, but longer drives for ya.

 

I ride a plated bike just so I can go wherever desired as SilvFx says.

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you can use the $15 fold down mirrors that you can hardly see.  it's not like you can even see behind you with the short reach and the vibration.  the most effective mirror would be one mounted to your helmet like the bicycle riders do.

 

To be clear, you dont have to plate right away, but there are somethings you need to have in order to convert an offroad bike to plated.  Here is a link to the actual form that you will turn into the DMV after being inspected for compliance by the Colorado State Patrol.  It is form DR2686. CSP will also provide a completed form DR2704.

 

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/DR2686.pdf

 

Pay attention to this part at the top of the form:

Proof of Ownership must state the motorcycle is off-road by providing one of the following:

  • Manufacturer's Statement of Origin (MSO)
  • Bill of Sale (Notarized or Signed Under Penalty of Perjury)
  • Dealer's Invoice
  • Off highway Title
  • DR 2444 Statement of Fact, stating motorcycle has no odometer mechanism (if applicable) (a trip meteris not an odometer mechanism)

What this means is the MSO, or the Bill of Sale or the Dealer's Invoice must state that the motorcycle is for off-road use only.  I have the specific Penalty of Perjury language that must be included on the Bill of Sale as recommended by the Arapahoe County DMV office is that is something you need.

 

The reason that you need to know this now is when you purchase the motorcycle, you need to get your paperwork in order so that you have the ability to plate it later.

 

The last two items are recent additions that make it easier, but I am not certain how easily that will work.  If you buy a bike like a KTM that has an odometer, you cant use the DR2444 statement of fact form.  But if you buy something like a WR450F or something without an odometer then you can use the DR2444 form as proof that it is an off-road bike.  The Off Hwy Title is a new process that was put in place last year and I am unfamiliar with the provisions of doing that, but I believe you might be able to get an OHV title by registering the motorcycle at least once for an OHV permit.

 

Anyhow, DMV/county clerks used to be absolute sticklers for this and if you bought a motorcycle using just a bill of sale (which was very common here in Colorado), unless it indicated it was for off-road use with the seller declaring under penalty of perjury in the second degree on the actual bill of sale you were out of luck being able to plate it.  Frankly, the easiest and best way to ensure you can convert it and plate it is to get the MSO indicating it is for offroad use only.  I am surprised how many sellers fail to get this....or finance a bike and never follow up with finance company to ensure they pass it on to the owner once paid off.  Ensuring the seller has the MSO or a title when you purchase the bike is one way to make sure that it is paid off and the financing company doesn't actually have legal title/ownership of the motorcycle.  When sellers start doing a song/dance about why they don't have the MSO, I walk away from the deal unless they have some sort of paperwork/paper trail showing the entire chain of possession and that it hasnt been financed.

 

 

This is excellent info and helps a lot. I'll keep everything in mind. Appreciate the details 

 

Welcome to CO.  At least you are a dirt biker. Lets for sure shut the door on the greenie types that think the trails are only for hiking, riding bicycles (don't get me wrong...I mtn bike too, so I'm not totally against the pedaling crowd) or for equestrians. A few more dirt bikers won't hurt and will give us more clout in the access battles.

 

Give some thought to a KTM 300. Light bikes with great power. They'll be hard to find used though...heck...they're hard to find new!

 

Where will home be?  If you'll be on the south side of Denver perhaps we could hook up for some mid-week local rides. It'd work from the north end of town too, but longer drives for ya.

 

I ride a plated bike just so I can go wherever desired as SilvFx says.

 

 

That sounds excellent.

I'll be working close to the DTC, so yes, south of Denver.

About home, still looking for places, and trying to define areas, but mostly sure will be close to work, to avoid spending too many time on traffic.

 

If everything goes right, I think I'll be there by the end of April, probably a few days later, but not more than that.

 

Having someone in the area would be terrific.

 

Would love to ride midweek, not sure if my office 8 to 5 work will allow me much of that but will try for sure, at least some short (couple hours) rides. Shouldn't hurt anyone :)

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If you are working at DTC, summertime afternoon/evening rides at Rampart are popular and not far. 

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If you are working at DTC, summertime afternoon/evening rides at Rampart are popular and not far. 

 

close to it...about 5miles south so yes...

 

I have to drive about 250 miles to ride, only on weekends where I live now, so being able to ride mid week, 20mins ago from home, it's like a dream.  :rolleyes:

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