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TECH TIP: Torqueing those Hard to get at Cylinder Head Nuts.

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Here's a little Tech tip/trick I discovered & want to Share with you guys with Yamaha's or any Make for that manner where you can't get a 14MM socket on the nuts when Torqueing your Cylinder Head, use a 9/16 distributor wrench in those hard to get spots, I don't trust just "winging it &/or hoping for the best" when it comes to engine Work I like things done Right the first time & Believe in Torqueing everything to Spec, if you don't have one you can get one at AutoZone for around 8 bucks, mines a Snap-on that cost me like 60 bucks years ago when cars & trucks still Ran adjustable distributors.
 Note: Torque on Yamaha YZ 250 Smoker is 30 ft-lbs Bottom Head, top head is 18 ft-lbs
 

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Edited by HURRICANE HUBBARD
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Hey Guys... new here....I'm sure I'm about to get schooled but....

 

Using a torque wrench that is set to any particular setting applies a a known torque to the socket (and therefore bolt/nut/etc).  Actually, your hand applies the force, the wrench handle converts to torsional force...and the little spring inside the wrench lets you know you've achieved enough torque by "clicking".  Nothing new here...this is the "nerdy" section, right?

 

In your picture, it looks like your wrench is then attached to ANOTHER lever arm (the distributor wrench).  So you set your torque wrench setting...say to 18 ft-lbs, which is the torque applied to the END of your distributor wrench (where your hand would be) that is swinging on an "arc".  I don't think your torque wrench setting is directly related to what the distributor wrench head is actually torquing....unless you account for the additional lever created by the handle of the distributor wrench....

 

Can someone please straighten me out? I've confused myself.

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The distributor wrench is a good solution insofar as access is concerned, but it does in fact affect the reading one gets from the torque wrench versus actual applied torque.

 

The distributor wrench in this case is effectively the same as an ordinary torque wrench reach adapter with a built-in extension.

 

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IF the adapter is oriented to 90 degrees from the wrench handle, and is fairly short, you can direct read the torque and be very close.  When straight in line with the wrench handle, the adapter affects the applied torque by adding to the lever arm, just as you suggest:

 

Torque.gif

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Hey Guys... new here....I'm sure I'm about to get schooled but....

 

Using a torque wrench that is set to any particular setting applies a a known torque to the socket (and therefore bolt/nut/etc).  Actually, your hand applies the force, the wrench handle converts to torsional force...and the little spring inside the wrench lets you know you've achieved enough torque by "clicking".  Nothing new here...this is the "nerdy" section, right?

 

In your picture, it looks like your wrench is then attached to ANOTHER lever arm (the distributor wrench).  So you set your torque wrench setting...say to 18 ft-lbs, which is the torque applied to the END of your distributor wrench (where your hand would be) that is swinging on an "arc".  I don't think your torque wrench setting is directly related to what the distributor wrench head is actually torquing....unless you account for the additional lever created by the handle of the distributor wrench....

 

Can someone please straighten me out? I've confused myself.

as GrayRacer posted is correct, the varies on such low Torque makes little difference so my old Boss told me years ago he Worked for General Motors & then for Richard petty Racing so I trusted his opinion, but if you must--> http://www.freeinfostuff.com/torqueextension/torqueextension.htm
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... the varies on such low Torque makes little difference so my old Boss told me years ago he Worked for General Motors & then for Richard petty Racing so I trusted his opinion, ...

Well, if that's your attitude, why even bother with a torque wrench at all on "such low torque"?  Just take them all down to 2 flats tighter than snugged up and call it good.

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Well, if that's your attitude, why even bother with a torque wrench at all on "such low torque"?  Just take them all down to 2 flats tighter than snugged up and call it good.

I didn't say I practiced it, just said I kind of agree with it BUT not on my Race Engine! as you Stated

 

The distributor wrench in this case is effectively the same as an ordinary torque wrench reach adapter with a built-in extension

I knew that & agree with you on this, I Want my stuff Torqued to Spec, Please lets not get into a Debate over this Topic, I started this Topic to Help others & felt it was Valid without Question or debate.

Edited by HURRICANE HUBBARD

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The problem is that while your tool tip is in fact quite useful, it left out important information regarding it's effect on actual torque applied to the fasteners.  In the case of an 18" torque wrench with a 4" long adapter or distributor wrench fit to the torque wrench in a straight line, it increases applied torque by 22% from 30 to 36 ft/lb.  If the torque wrench is shorter, or the adapter longer, the error gets bigger.  Using a 14" wrench with the same adapter mounted the same way, the error increases to 28% or 38.5 ft/lb instead of 30.

 

You may be aware of this, and in your own opinion think it's insignificant, but I can name several specific places where that large an excess of torque applied to a fastener would be seriously problematic.  I doubt it would really be OK with you if you gave advice to a friend who then relied on it and snapped off an important stud one day because of it.

 

Neither I nor Alfo dispute what you said regarding the utility of the tool, but the additional information is necessary to alert others who were not aware of it to the potential for problems resulting from its misapplication.  If you want to post stuff and just have it accepted as all true and wonderful without any discussion, you should either be more comprehensive or avoid discussion forums.

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The problem is that while your tool tip is in fact quite useful, it left out important information regarding it's effect on actual torque applied to the fasteners.  In the case of an 18" torque wrench with a 4" long adapter or distributor wrench fit to the torque wrench in a straight line, it increases applied torque by 22% from 30 to 36 ft/lb.  If the torque wrench is shorter, or the adapter longer, the error gets bigger.  Using a 14" wrench with the same adapter mounted the same way, the error increases to 28% or 38.5 ft/lb instead of 30.

 

just to make it Clearer My friend I posted this tip for the Everyday weekend Warrior kind of guys/gals that just want a Quick Solution to the issue without resorting to using a box end Wrench, not for Engineers, Why over Complicate the Matter?

Edited by HURRICANE HUBBARD

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 Why over Complicate the Matter?

 

In the interest of providing complete information.  If your interest was in reaching the weekend warrior types, you might have better posted in General Discussion.

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Sorry guys.  Didn't mean to stir the pot!  I just like my bolts (read head bolts) torqued to spec and I think you both do as well..  I was certainly right.... Sent straight to school!!!  Thanks for the info, Gray and thanks Hurricane for the general tip.  Now that I can correlate the linked wrench's applied torque to a reading on the wrench's handle, I'll be careful when using this technique and apply an accurate torque. 

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Sorry guys.  Didn't mean to stir the pot!  I just like my bolts (read head bolts) torqued to spec and I think you both do as well..  I was certainly right.... Sent straight to school!!!  Thanks for the info, Gray and thanks Hurricane for the general tip.  Now that I can correlate the linked wrench's applied torque to a reading on the wrench's handle, I'll be careful when using this technique and apply an accurate torque. 

its Cool, I just like Helping others, I can't speak for the Gray one.

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The problem is that while your tool tip is in fact quite useful, it left out important information regarding it's effect on actual torque applied to the fasteners.  In the case of an 18" torque wrench with a 4" long adapter or distributor wrench fit to the torque wrench in a straight line, it increases applied torque by 22% from 30 to 36 ft/lb.  If the torque wrench is shorter, or the adapter longer, the error gets bigger.  Using a 14" wrench with the same adapter mounted the same way, the error increases to 28% or 38.5 ft/lb instead of 30.

 

You may be aware of this, and in your own opinion think it's insignificant, but I can name several specific places where that large an excess of torque applied to a fastener would be seriously problematic.  I doubt it would really be OK with you if you gave advice to a friend who then relied on it and snapped off an important stud one day because of it.

 

Neither I nor Alfo dispute what you said regarding the utility of the tool, but the additional information is necessary to alert others who were not aware of it to the potential for problems resulting from its misapplication.  If you want to post stuff and just have it accepted as all true and wonderful without any discussion, you should either be more comprehensive or avoid discussion forums.

QFT. You are my favorite person. That is all. 

Edited by joman2055

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If you'd like to avoid the error, or math, that Gray explained, you can just make sure the handle of the torque wrench is perpendicular to the extension provided by the adapter. This will keep the lever arm and torque the same, while still allowing access to the bolts. 

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