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i have a very underwhelming bike for my age (CRF100F)  but i am still managing to do small wheelies. i have one major problem though, and that is falling sideways. Due to the lack of power on the 100, i cannot reliably keep the speed up and i keep falling sideways. Can anyone help me troubleshoot this problem? Whether its keeping the bars straight, or something else?

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i have a very underwhelming bike for my age (CRF100F)  but i am still managing to do small wheelies. i have one major problem though, and that is falling sideways. Due to the lack of power on the 100, i cannot reliably keep the speed up and i keep falling sideways. Can anyone help me troubleshoot this problem? Whether its keeping the bars straight, or something else?

 

Don't need power to do wheelies. I have a little ttr-50 that is ridden primarily on just the back tire. To keep your speed consistent you need to go back further. To go back further, you'll need to have decent rear brake control. You need to be on the balance point or very very close to it. If the bike is before the balance point, you'll be chasing it with throttle and run out of gear. If the bike is past the balance point, you'll be on the back brake, feathering the clutch and slowing down. Get used to pulling up the front end with low RPMs. Once you find balance point work towards clutching it up right to the balance point. To keep it straight, you gotta be active on the bike, when you feel it start tipping to one side, adjust your weight, body position and how you're pulling on the bars to counter the bike. It helps if you start the wheelie in a neutral position. Before you pull the front end up, pay attention to your body position and how you're weighting the bike, you want to be square and neutrally balanced favoring the rear a bit. 

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Wheelies do not need speed if you watch some of the trials folks they can start and keep a wheelie going at a crawl. If you are falling or going sideways it is a weight issue either you are leaning or transferring your weight to one side, another issue can be the pressure that you are putting on the pegs you may be applying more downward pressure to one side without realizing it.

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im sitting where the seat meets the rear plastics. i can easily get it past the balance point but the bike has drum brakes and they arent the best. But thanks for the detailed info!

 

adjust the brakes then, my ttr50 and my xt250 have drums too. With a little fiddling you can get them to work pretty damn well.

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I have the same issue, falling left or right, so I will ask my question here rather than my old thread. I don't like the odds in just keeping at it till I figure it out. I am a thinker, a planer. I want to know what it is that I should do and then try to implement it. So, think hard as to what you guys do instinctive to balance left and right. I understand if you pull up not square or misweighted, then your going to likely lean left or right, wheelie soon going down. What I want to know is specifically, and you may not even know because you do it instinctive, I want to know how you shift weight around to keep it balanced. Do you move your shoulders, or your hips ..... opposite direction of the  lean? Do you specifically weight the opposite foot peg? If I could keep it up straight for any amount of time, balance point and throttle control will be the easy part for me. 

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I've found that falling to one side is caused by pulling up harder with one hand than the other.  If you are balanced on the bike and pull up on the bars evenly you won't fall to the side.

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I think my problem may be that i tilt the bars to one side. its the same on my MTB, i can keep it in a wheelie if i can balance it from side to side! I believe i have fine body positioning, its just i pull the bike up dominantly with my right hand and i'm turning the throttle as well as pulling. i am left handed but its the throttle. Should i practice at keeping the bars straight?

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Don't pull up. Clutch up. No use reefing on it like a drunk ape. Learning to clutch up your front wheel will also help on the trails for tight turnarounds and navigating over obstacles.

Don't sit way back on the seat either, it will just throw you off.

If you don't want to get hurt, the best way to learn slow wheelies is to do the "fag drag" start from a complete stop in 1st or 2nd with your left foot on the ground. Keep your right foot on the rear brake. It's harder in mx boots but not impossible. Rev the throttle, pop the clutch and the bike will come up. If it doesn't add more throttle and be more aggressive with the clutch. Then use the rear brake to bring the bike back down. DON'T CHASE IT trying for the longest wheelie! Be patient and practice this until you are doing it in your sleep. Do it maybe a dozen times and then take a brake, ride around and get some air over the radiators, have a snack, whatever and then practice more.

Try to get the front wheel up in as little distance as possible. Also work on throttle control, you want to get it so you use enough throttle to get the front up quick, but as soon as you reach balance point, you are back down to basically idle. At the BP, you don't need power to keep the wheel up, technically... but when the wheel inevitably starts to dip you will need to blip it to get it back up. If you wait too long you will need to stay on the gas longer and you will just chase it out. If you start going back too fat a light tap on the brake is all you need. Don't do it too hard on you will have to be right back on the gas.

Once you get good with the fag drag and can keep your wheelie going slow and straight, then gradually start picking your foot up. Balance point to is a LOTS higher than you think. On sport bikes, the rule of thumb is your forks should be horizontal, so when I was learning I would film myself from the side to see how far back I actually was. When I saw I was nowhere near balance point I knew I had to grow a set and gradually start pushing it back farther and farther. It won't feel natural, but just keep doing it until you get used to it, that's the only way.

It may help to set your idle up a little bit. But you'll overheat faster if you don't have fans.

Save your self getting hurt and learn them slow. Anyone can wheelie going fast but without control when you push it you get hurt. It takes skill to wheelie slow, and when you can do that, fast wheelies will be easy. I've wheelies everything from my xr50 to full sized street stunt bikes. Stand up, sit down, seat, tank, circle, no hands, scrape, park, whatever! Once you get the basics, dirtbikes are stupid easy to wheelie, but perfect to learn on! And it's always fun to be the guy in the group that can ride them down the road forever, or around in circles at the staging area while everyone else is still getting ready!

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PS I just reread that you have a crf100. Don't worry, those little bikes are wheelie machines! I fixed one up for a friend one time and almost didn't want to give it back to her I was having so much fun doing wheelies in the yard. I'm 6'2" and was 175 at the time. Certainly enough bike for me. Just be aggressive with the throttle and clutch work!

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Don't pull up. Clutch up. No use reefing on it like a drunk ape. Learning to clutch up your front wheel will also help on the trails for tight turnarounds and navigating over obstacles.

Don't sit way back on the seat either, it will just throw you off.

If you don't want to get hurt, the best way to learn slow wheelies is to do the "fag drag" start from a complete stop in 1st or 2nd with your left foot on the ground. Keep your right foot on the rear brake. It's harder in mx boots but not impossible. Rev the throttle, pop the clutch and the bike will come up. If it doesn't add more throttle and be more aggressive with the clutch. Then use the rear brake to bring the bike back down. DON'T CHASE IT trying for the longest wheelie! Be patient and practice this until you are doing it in your sleep. Do it maybe a dozen times and then take a brake, ride around and get some air over the radiators, have a snack, whatever and then practice more.

Try to get the front wheel up in as little distance as possible. Also work on throttle control, you want to get it so you use enough throttle to get the front up quick, but as soon as you reach balance point, you are back down to basically idle. At the BP, you don't need power to keep the wheel up, technically... but when the wheel inevitably starts to dip you will need to blip it to get it back up. If you wait too long you will need to stay on the gas longer and you will just chase it out. If you start going back too fat a light tap on the brake is all you need. Don't do it too hard on you will have to be right back on the gas.

Once you get good with the fag drag and can keep your wheelie going slow and straight, then gradually start picking your foot up. Balance point to is a LOTS higher than you think. On sport bikes, the rule of thumb is your forks should be horizontal, so when I was learning I would film myself from the side to see how far back I actually was. When I saw I was nowhere near balance point I knew I had to grow a set and gradually start pushing it back farther and farther. It won't feel natural, but just keep doing it until you get used to it, that's the only way.

It may help to set your idle up a little bit. But you'll overheat faster if you don't have fans.

Save your self getting hurt and learn them slow. Anyone can wheelie going fast but without control when you push it you get hurt. It takes skill to wheelie slow, and when you can do that, fast wheelies will be easy. I've wheelies everything from my xr50 to full sized street stunt bikes. Stand up, sit down, seat, tank, circle, no hands, scrape, park, whatever! Once you get the basics, dirtbikes are stupid easy to wheelie, but perfect to learn on! And it's always fun to be the guy in the group that can ride them down the road forever, or around in circles at the staging area while everyone else is still getting ready!

thanks for the information, I learned a lot from it.

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Don't pull up. Clutch up. No use reefing on it like a drunk ape. Learning to clutch up your front wheel will also help on the trails for tight turnarounds and navigating over obstacles.

Don't sit way back on the seat either, it will just throw you off.

If you don't want to get hurt, the best way to learn slow wheelies is to do the "fag drag" start from a complete stop in 1st or 2nd with your left foot on the ground. Keep your right foot on the rear brake. It's harder in mx boots but not impossible. Rev the throttle, pop the clutch and the bike will come up. If it doesn't add more throttle and be more aggressive with the clutch. Then use the rear brake to bring the bike back down. DON'T CHASE IT trying for the longest wheelie! Be patient and practice this until you are doing it in your sleep. Do it maybe a dozen times and then take a brake, ride around and get some air over the radiators, have a snack, whatever and then practice more.

Try to get the front wheel up in as little distance as possible. Also work on throttle control, you want to get it so you use enough throttle to get the front up quick, but as soon as you reach balance point, you are back down to basically idle. At the BP, you don't need power to keep the wheel up, technically... but when the wheel inevitably starts to dip you will need to blip it to get it back up. If you wait too long you will need to stay on the gas longer and you will just chase it out. If you start going back too fat a light tap on the brake is all you need. Don't do it too hard on you will have to be right back on the gas.

Once you get good with the fag drag and can keep your wheelie going slow and straight, then gradually start picking your foot up. Balance point to is a LOTS higher than you think. On sport bikes, the rule of thumb is your forks should be horizontal, so when I was learning I would film myself from the side to see how far back I actually was. When I saw I was nowhere near balance point I knew I had to grow a set and gradually start pushing it back farther and farther. It won't feel natural, but just keep doing it until you get used to it, that's the only way.

It may help to set your idle up a little bit. But you'll overheat faster if you don't have fans.

Save your self getting hurt and learn them slow. Anyone can wheelie going fast but without control when you push it you get hurt. It takes skill to wheelie slow, and when you can do that, fast wheelies will be easy. I've wheelies everything from my xr50 to full sized street stunt bikes. Stand up, sit down, seat, tank, circle, no hands, scrape, park, whatever! Once you get the basics, dirtbikes are stupid easy to wheelie, but perfect to learn on! And it's always fun to be the guy in the group that can ride them down the road forever, or around in circles at the staging area while everyone else is still getting ready!

 

this guy knows whats up. 

 

The side to side stability when going slow, on a MTB or motorcycle, is all body position and weight distribution. If youre falling over to one side, youre leaning to one side. A knee out on one side can be enough to screw you all up until you develop the muscle memory to just balance. Where your butt is on the seat (sit down wheelies), how you're weighting the pegs (stand up wheelies), how you're pulling on the bars, where your shoulders and hips are... it all plays into it. How you're pulling on the bars is the part many people get hung up on. Your hands are doing two different things but need to be pulling on the bars equally, which is not a natural thing. I don't mean pulling on the bars to physically get the front tire off the ground, I mean pulling on the bars to support your own body weight. If you really pay attention to your body, you'll probably notice that when your right hand is twisting the throttle and your left hand is operating the clutch you're actually using mostly your left arm to support your body weight to facilitate better throttle control. This will cause you to tip over in either direction. You'll either tip over from the uneven pull on the bars or your body will subconsciously try and compensate for this and while your brain will make sure your body is balanced, its not taking the balance of the bike itself into consideration... so you tip over. Most people learning to wheelie are also very stiff on the bike when the front wheel comes up. When your stiff on the bike, your body can't move around well on the bike to keep balance.  

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Im 

 

Don't pull up. Clutch up. No use reefing on it like a drunk ape. Learning to clutch up your front wheel will also help on the trails for tight turnarounds and navigating over obstacles.

Don't sit way back on the seat either, it will just throw you off.

If you don't want to get hurt, the best way to learn slow wheelies is to do the "fag drag" start from a complete stop in 1st or 2nd with your left foot on the ground. Keep your right foot on the rear brake. It's harder in mx boots but not impossible. Rev the throttle, pop the clutch and the bike will come up. If it doesn't add more throttle and be more aggressive with the clutch. Then use the rear brake to bring the bike back down. DON'T CHASE IT trying for the longest wheelie! Be patient and practice this until you are doing it in your sleep. Do it maybe a dozen times and then take a brake, ride around and get some air over the radiators, have a snack, whatever and then practice more.

Try to get the front wheel up in as little distance as possible. Also work on throttle control, you want to get it so you use enough throttle to get the front up quick, but as soon as you reach balance point, you are back down to basically idle. At the BP, you don't need power to keep the wheel up, technically... but when the wheel inevitably starts to dip you will need to blip it to get it back up. If you wait too long you will need to stay on the gas longer and you will just chase it out. If you start going back too fat a light tap on the brake is all you need. Don't do it too hard on you will have to be right back on the gas.

Once you get good with the fag drag and can keep your wheelie going slow and straight, then gradually start picking your foot up. Balance point to is a LOTS higher than you think. On sport bikes, the rule of thumb is your forks should be horizontal, so when I was learning I would film myself from the side to see how far back I actually was. When I saw I was nowhere near balance point I knew I had to grow a set and gradually start pushing it back farther and farther. It won't feel natural, but just keep doing it until you get used to it, that's the only way.

It may help to set your idle up a little bit. But you'll overheat faster if you don't have fans.

Save your self getting hurt and learn them slow. Anyone can wheelie going fast but without control when you push it you get hurt. It takes skill to wheelie slow, and when you can do that, fast wheelies will be easy. I've wheelies everything from my xr50 to full sized street stunt bikes. Stand up, sit down, seat, tank, circle, no hands, scrape, park, whatever! Once you get the basics, dirtbikes are stupid easy to wheelie, but perfect to learn on! And it's always fun to be the guy in the group that can ride them down the road forever, or around in circles at the staging area while everyone else is still getting ready!

im not that bad :p I can clutch it up easy, its just falling side to side that ruins me. i was doing them really nicely yesterday, im getting the feel for moving my body around a bit. I can just hang on it and ride along easy if ive got it upright! Yeah about the speed, ive learnt to control that a bit more, i guess i was chasing the balance point

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