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Well it happened, living in the Houston area finally caught up with me. On Monday my 250x and my boys' ttr125 and xr70r got flooded when my garage had 2-3' of water in it and now we're left cleaning up.

My plan is to drain the oil, pull the carbs/bowls, air filters, etc. and just let it all dry for a number of days. Clean the bikes up and lubricate everything I can find. I've never dealt with a water logged bike, what all do y'all suggest?

Btw for everyone's info, flood insurance does not cover any "self-propelled vehicles" apart from lawn mowers and handicap items. Needless to say the adjuster gave me the middle finger on getting any help/coverage on the bikes. Also, your homeowner's insurance will absolutely not cover anything if it resulted from a flood so there is no help from them either.

TIA everyone - just looking at that picture breaks my heart

ImageUploadedByThumper Talk1461331401.901576.jpg

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They'll most likely be fine.  Just make sure you lube everything.  Maybe flush the gearboxes with diesel or kerosene.

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Well it happened, living in the Houston area finally caught up with me. On Monday my 250x and my boys' ttr125 and xr70r got flooded when my garage had 2-3' of water in it and now we're left cleaning up.

My plan is to drain the oil, pull the carbs/bowls, air filters, etc. and just let it all dry for a number of days. Clean the bikes up and lubricate everything I can find. I've never dealt with a water logged bike, what all do y'all suggest?

Btw for everyone's info, flood insurance does not cover any "self-propelled vehicles" apart from lawn mowers and handicap items. Needless to say the adjuster gave me the middle finger on getting any help/coverage on the bikes. Also, your homeowner's insurance will absolutely not cover anything if it resulted from a flood so there is no help from them either.

TIA everyone - just looking at that picture breaks my heart

ImageUploadedByThumper Talk1461331401.901576.jpg

Drain oil and flush it multiple times until there is no moisture left in the motors. Also I'd blow out all of the electrical connectors with compressed air and change all filters and new fuel. Wd40 on the metal parts will also help to avoid rusting.

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1.) Pull the spark plug

2.) Stand the bike up on its back wheel (like wheeling) let water drain

3.) Kick bike over with plug out to pump and water out

4.) Change all fluids, new air filters

5.) Get them running asap! The longer the water sits the more it will rust parts and bearings. If you can get them running the heat of the motor will help burn off any water. Change oil a lot at first to help flush out water and any other contaminants. 

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The sooner you can get them drained and the oil changed, the better.  Once you get the oil changed, go ahead and start them up and get some heat in them.  Even if there's some residual water left in the engines, it won't be enough to do any damage.  Once they're good and warm, change the oil again.

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Get the engines running and hot to drive out as much moisture as possible after draining and refilling the oil. Try soaking the chains in warm motor oil to drive out the water. Used, freshly drained motor oil is good for that job. Take the wheels off and get all the water and crud out of the hubs. Don't be surprised if the bearings don't make it. Maybe deflate the tires and see if water seeped inside the rims. Chances are 50/50 on that, but if it did, you don't want to let it sit in there, even if the rims are aluminum the water will promote corrosion in the spoke nipples.

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What everyone else said.  Since they weren't running, they shouldn't have ingested any water, other than what flowed into the exhaust and airbox.  At least it won't have been sucked forcefully into the engine.  It sounds like yet another loophole where none of your insurance will cover loss to a bike without a plate?  Flood insurance / insurance in general is confusing by design...

Edited by Low Roller

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Time is of the essence. I saved a 01 Road Star using a similar method Freeriders listed above. I had the bike for two years after with no signs it was affected by being drowned. The only major thing I had to do was change the electronics to avoid electrical concerns. My friend was affected also by the flood where his bike downed also. He waited a couple of months to fix it. When we finally got the bike running, the engine knocked and rust emerged everywhere. The bike couldn't even be parted. Don't wait, you should have cleaned it yesterday 

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Realize that the water is not just water like a river crossing gone bad.  Flood water is full of silt and you want to flush 100% of that out before starting them.

 

Your wheel bearings and swing arm linkage bearings are definitely trash, chains are probably trash.

Edited by OrangeYZ

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OrangeYZ, on 22 Apr 2016 - 11:24 AM, said:

Realize that the water is not just water like a river crossing gone bad.  Flood water is full of silt and you want to flush 100% of that out before starting them.

 

Your wheel bearings and swing arm linkage bearings are definitely trash, chains are probably trash.

 

Why would chains be trash?  Don't you ever ride in mud?

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Why would chains be trash?  Don't you ever ride in mud?

Yeah, and it trashes chains.

But riding in the mud is not the same as sitting in water for a couple of days.  Maybe the OP can flush the dirt out and get them in oil before they rust.  Maybe not. 

If he ignores them because "Chains will be fine, just like riding in the mud," I'd lean towards Maybe Not.

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Well it happened, living in the Houston area finally caught up with me. On Monday my 250x and my boys' ttr125 and xr70r got flooded when my garage had 2-3' of water in it and now we're left cleaning up.

My plan is to drain the oil, pull the carbs/bowls, air filters, etc. and just let it all dry for a number of days. Clean the bikes up and lubricate everything I can find. I've never dealt with a water logged bike, what all do y'all suggest?

 

Water logged bikes are not a big deal. Wash them off pull the plugs, kick it over a few times, change oil and ride on.... :ride: If you wanted to be EXTRA EXTRA careful change the oil again after a ride.

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if you can not get it running soon after you drain every thing pour wd40 threw a vent or hose in the valve cover and fill the motor all the way up.then remove plug and fill cylinder up with wd40. let that sit 10 min then drain it all. that will remove the little water that is left in the motor and keep it from rusting further.   

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Looks to me that the ttr and the 250 are fine the water dosent seem high enough to go into those air boxes as for the 70 it's probably flooded I would pull he seats on the 250 and ttr and see if the water got in the air box if not those bikes should be fine as for the 70 I would pull the plug and see if there is water in there if so tip it upside down drain it and then take the exauhst off and kick it until the water is gone, lube it up throw in some fresh gas and good to go

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Swingarm, linkage bearings are sealed very well, especially on a Honda. Any o-ring chain is fine also. Some of this is just ridiculous. Zero worries.

Edited by YHGEORGE
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Btw for everyone's info, flood insurance does not cover any "self-propelled vehicles" apart from lawn mowers and handicap items. Needless to say the adjuster gave me the middle finger on getting any help/coverage on the bikes. Also, your homeowner's insurance will absolutely not cover anything if it resulted from a flood so there is no help from them either.

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Remove chains and tell them the engines are for sound effects.

All seriousness, this sucks, sorry man

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Flush the brake fluid if any of the master cylinders have been submerged (that CRF250/450X on the right)

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