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Husqvarna's 2017 motocross range gets traction control

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Husqvarna's 2017 motocross range gets traction control
Spiros Tsantilas May 17, 2016

11 pictures
husqvarna-2017-motocross-lineup-12.jpg?a

Husqvarna is the first manufacturer to unveil its 2017 weaponry, and as the rest of the class is gradually revealed over coming months we expect to see more factories adding traction control to their motocross models (Credit: Husqvarna) View gallery (11 images)


Husqvarna is debuting traction control on its four-stroke motocross models for 2017, along with new WP front forks for the whole lineup and a brand new TC250 two-stroke.
 
more/original article:
http://www.gizmag.com/husqvarna-2017-motocross-range/43383/

 

More on Husky's 2017 motocross range:

http://www.thumpertalk.com/wiki/_/husqvarna%E2%80%99s-new-2017-motocross-range-unveiled-r548

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Anyone know how the traction control works? I'm assuming its pulling timing to reduce power/wheel spin but how is it calculating wheel spin? Is it a front/rear rotational speed differential with a certain % of slip allowed before timing is pulled? Probably more appropriate for the tech section. 

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Anyone know how the traction control works? I'm assuming its pulling timing to reduce power/wheel spin but how is it calculating wheel spin? Is it a front/rear rotational speed differential with a certain % of slip allowed before timing is pulled? Probably more appropriate for the tech section.

I believe it is based on the rate of change of engine rpm. Not sure wheel speed differential would be as effective.

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KTM/HUSKY seem to have forgotten the whole point of Countersteering & reducing the risk of riders flipping the bike - headbutting the handlebars while adding that expensive electronic gadget to the already overpriced machinery.

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I believe it is based on the rate of change of engine rpm. Not sure wheel speed differential would be as effective.

 

Thats pretty cool. I'd be interested to see more technical details on the system and how its indexed and such. I imagine those details won't be public knowledge until the aftermarket figures it out. Without knowing anything about the actual system, it seems like this method would only be effective if the bike was kept stock? Changing flywheel weight will change the rate that RPMs build. So will running a heavy ass tire, to a lesser degree. Intake, exhaust, cam, displacement... all could potentially change the rate at which RPMs build. Not trying to argue, just making observations/posing questions. I think this is a pretty cool progression in dirt bikes but I think its got the potential to be a big crutch for less than pro riders. 

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KTM/HUSKY seem to have forgotten the whole point of Countersteering & reducing the risk of riders flipping the bike - headbutting the handlebars while adding that expensive electronic gadget to the already overpriced machinery.

I'm sure it's not full time TC. A switch or fuse will shut it off.

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I'm sure it's not full time TC. A switch or fuse will shut it off.

 

the article implies it will be full time. However, I also assume it will be another switch on the bars like map selection. 

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This
 
Crossfire%20XZ250R%20joker%20throttle.jp

plus this

clutch-perch-and-lever.jpg

Has always seemed to work well for me. I'm all for advancements, but I really don't want TC on my bike. More cost & complexity. Solution looking for a problem? As the old saying goes, there's a butt for every seat and with Husky being KTMs premium brand, maybe it will be a hit?

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This

 

Crossfire%20XZ250R%20joker%20throttle.jp

plus this

clutch-perch-and-lever.jpg

Has always seemed to work well for me. I'm all for advancements, but I really don't want TC on my bike. More cost & complexity. Solution looking for a problem?

indeed...

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Will be interesting to see how the system works, both mechanically and how it affects the way the bike reacts to rider inputs. My guess is it is far less intrusive than most people think. There are many times a rider wants to spin the tire, or do something on purpose that the types of traction control we are used to would stop from happening. It won't be able to apply the brakes but I suppose it will be able to cut engine power.

 

KTM/Husky are not dumb, it will either have some benefits but may be a marketing thing kind of like launch control.... 

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I think that clutch and throttle control are really all the traction control that you actually need. However, I like these advancements and think they are stepping stones to better and more advanced engine management systems. Sooner or later, we're going to get to the point where dirt bike engine management systems are similar in functionality to something like microsquirt, holley dominator, bigstuff 3...etc (for you car guys out there) and I can't wait for that to happen. I'm sure that they'll progress beyond that to include telemetry for the pit crew to make on the fly adjustments to the bike during the race... as long as the rules allow for it. Being able to plug a laptop into a bike, adjust all the fuel and ignition tables, TPS values, indexing of launch control & traction control .... etc is where this is leading us to. 

I think traction control would be cool in the mud and on retarded steep hill climbs where even Jarvis, Walker, Haaker and the likes are spinning tire. It would be a cool option to have on the bars. It will probably be marketed as something you can't live without and the mags will say its the best thing since sliced bread when in reality its probably just a cool option that a few people will actually use. Then because marketing builds up everyones expectations, everyone will complain about it because they expected it to make them ride like pros while its really only useful in very specific situations. 

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It has nothing to do with technological marketing gimmicks and everything to do with european on-road vehicle safety standards.  Husky is just a little bit ahead of the point in time where *all* motorcycles for the european marketplace will be *required* to have traction control and/or ABS.  Ducati, BMW and others have had these functions for years, as required or on-road motorcycles.

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It has nothing to do with technological marketing gimmicks and everything to do with european on-road vehicle safety standards.  Husky is just a little bit ahead of the point in time where *all* motorcycles for the european marketplace will be *required* to have traction control and/or ABS.  Ducati, BMW and others have had these functions for years, as required or on-road motorcycles.

 

Interesting but I doubt mx bike traction control would satisfy the requirements for on road traction control. Also, why would a manuf. put traction control meant for the pavement on an off road only bike? The traction control systems can't be the same. Traction control for the street could be pretty basic but traction control for the dirt has to be considerably more complex and operate on different indexes and metrics.. a road traction control system isnt going to be designed to compensate for jumps or the small amount of wheel spin that knobbys require for traction

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Honda is using fly by wire and TC on their current rally bike. Saw an interview with their team manager and he talked about it. It's coming for everyone probably at some time.

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Sounds gimmicky and more stuff to break

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Why not just let  the rider steer and let an engine mgt system be programmed into the black box for a particular track to handle all the acceleration, braking etc? Lets remove the rider skill and fun from the sport. And don't forget those airbags! What an awesome future to contemplate.

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Don't have a problem with traction control... it's got to add a competitive edge in a slick muddy offload event.

 

I'm fine with it if it's going to help me from getting tired early.

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