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new 2016 enduro R eating oil like a pig

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so it's so bad with these 690 engines???  in any of my bikes I didn't have to pay special attention to sitting rings in cylinders...

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Hi all,

I have a Husky Fe 701 Enduro and thereby the same engine as the 690. It has the same problem and uses about 1 liter on 1,000km (now 5,000 km ridden). On a day ride I have to check oil at every gas station , something I didn't have to do since I rode a Triumph Speed Twin 500 from 1954, the Speed Twin engine actually used less oil but dropped it on the road instead.

And then all the talk about how to run in a bike! Yes fine and it's true that rings have to seat and so on, however I have to say that if this is such a big problem I don't understand that KTM and Husky don't make a more detailed run in plan to get rid of all us complaining about this, I might be wrong but I think they even deliver the bike with synthetic oil.

Then there is all the guys saying that this piston is so big and hard to seal and so on and so forth, but did anyone hear about a new Maserati or Ferrari with 12 pistons in this size milling at high revs use 12 liter oil in 1,000 km ? - I don't think so. 

I have owned dusins of bikes (and cars) right from Vintage to Racers and the Husky 701 is my first experience with a new engine drinking oil like this.

But apart from that I love an enduro bike like this and here in Thailand where I ride its perfect. If KTM /Husky can fix it its lack of will, and I will do it myself and take it into my consideration when I look for a bike supplier next time.

So KTM and Husky: Back to the workshop and get this sorted out and make a plan how help the owners with this problem !!!! 

 

2016-09-24 12.41.21.jpg

2016-09-24 12.40.54.jpg

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I'm of the belief 99% of the ring seating happens when tested at the end of the assembly line. These new bikes that burn that much oil have something wrong with them ..period..Nothing (within reason) the owner does or doesn't do should make it burn oil like that. . KTM should fix it.. hell if they were really customer service focused they would offer a new bike.  

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I'd make a bet the valve seals haven't set themselves properly. A friend with an exc 400 had the same issue, drank oil, but still had plenty of power. He kept telling me it was just the way the bike was, but when he did the valves, which were pretty good in fact, the seals got replaced, and no more oil usage.

Its not a big job, and not hard to do but if the bike is new or still under warranty then dealer should sort it.

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I'm the OP here so figured now would be a good time to chime in... 

 

... the bike is at 8000km now and the oil consumption has drastically reduced. The real turning point seemed to be at 5000km. My calculated numbers after the initial 5000km have me at ~350ml per 1000km – which I'm okay with. I don't know, I'm not very mechanical so maybe even this is too high??? It sure as hell beats the 1L per 1000km that ktm warranty told my dealer was within spec for this 'high-performance' engine (as they refer to it as). I would've been fine from the start with everything if ktm noted that the bike would burn oil like crazy for the first few thousand km and eventually taper off rather than telling me it's simply the 'normal' expectation for this bike. I'm still having my dealer check the top-end (under warranty) over the winter to make sure ever everything has set properly. If not, we will report a claim. The dealer where I purchased the bike is actually really great and will go to battle vs ktm if need be – unfortunately they're 2 hours away and the local authorized ktm guys are absolutely useless. They're the ones who told me I was on the line to cover the costs to run any tests – said it was $150 to even get the ball rolling. And if by the end of it ktm decided something was faulty then I'd be reimbursed. Anyways, I'm hopeful and hoping this will be the end of the oil-eating.    

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I wouldn't be happy with the oil use described. Even 350ml/1000km seems excessive. (If any of my four 4 stroke KTMs started using that much I'd stop riding it till I fixed it.)

My 2008 690 uses no oil that I can notice.

I'm a little worried as I plan a 2017 690 in my life - new engine inc bore and stroke, so completely unknown.

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Wife and I both have 15's.  I changed oil to Mobile 1 0-40 at 60 miles on the clock for both bikes.  My wife's bike used a little more than mine up to about 2500 miles, but minimal, then no oil use.  We did a 1200 mile backcountry trip at about 3500 miles, both bikes did the trip without adding oil.

One thing we both did during break in is "frequently" back off the gas going down a grade and let the bike engine break down the hill.  Easier to do in Oregon than Nebraska - but I've done this on all my bikes and never had a "burner."  An old guy told me to do this on a new engine when I was a kid, so I just do it - no harm - no foul.

I run the 0-40 because it will cool better and lubricate better than a 50 or 60 weight.  Volume versus pressure........  I also run 2.1 liter of oil, a little more than the book says.  Never had an issue with oil in the airbox.

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Wife and I both have 15's.  I changed oil to Mobile 1 0-40 at 60 miles on the clock for both bikes.  My wife's bike used a little more than mine up to about 2500 miles, but minimal, then no oil use.  We did a 1200 mile backcountry trip at about 3500 miles, both bikes did the trip without adding oil.
One thing we both did during break in is "frequently" back off the gas going down a grade and let the bike engine break down the hill.  Easier to do in Oregon than Nebraska - but I've done this on all my bikes and never had a "burner."  An old guy told me to do this on a new engine when I was a kid, so I just do it - no harm - no foul.
I run the 0-40 because it will cool better and lubricate better than a 50 or 60 weight.  Volume versus pressure........  I also run 2.1 liter of oil, a little more than the book says.  Never had an issue with oil in the airbox.

This is funny because the Honda AP1 S2000 waa a notorious oil burner (9k redline) and everyone on the forums said if you wanna Stop oil consumption, Don't use Mobil 1, and that was true for that motor. Hope you two are enjoying those bikes, very fun machines! Maybe I'll see you out on the Aufderheide or Breitenbush or Quartz Creek!

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I'll be breaking in a 2017 KTM 690 ER and a 701 E next week. Going to break in using the MotoTune method.

So, the synthetic oil put in by KTM at the factory is getting drained, replaced with Motorex mineral engine oil, and drained after the first 20 miles. I'll continue to run the mineral oil till about a thousand miles, then switch back to synthetic. I'll report back after about any oil usage.

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I bought my 14 with 1200 miles on it and changed the oil with the recommended 10-60. A little over 3000 now and no discernible usage.

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My 14 690 burned quite a bit of oil at around 1100-1200 miles. My dealer recommended some Chevron Techron additive in the fuel which he said was the same as a product that Yamaha used to sell called "Ring Free". It seems to have helped reduce oil consumption but I will know better after my next oil change. With as many people who have experienced oil consumption issues there is no doubt an issue here. Too bad KTM refuses to admit it. None of my other KTMs have an issue with oil consumption.

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All this talk of proper break in is bull. There is a definit problem with these bikes. Rings should seat within the 1st few miles. After that it is just a matter of wearing in. Also as stated it's the decel that forces the rings to seat. That's when you have the most crankcase vacuum. In the 90s VW was having this problem with there 2.0aba engine. The TSB recomended doing a few 65-25 decels in gear.

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21 minutes ago, Brian Cole said:

All this talk of proper break in is bull. There is a definit problem with these bikes. Rings should seat within the 1st few miles. After that it is just a matter of wearing in. Also as stated it's the decel that forces the rings to seat. That's when you have the most crankcase vacuum. In the 90s VW was having this problem with there 2.0aba engine. The TSB recomended doing a few 65-25 decels in gear.

How does one account for different outcomes from different owners? I do agree regarding the importance of decel, but from my reading, MOST of the break-in happens in roughly the first 20ish miles, but continues for around a 1,000. Of course, this varies from bike to bike. Also, these bikes come from KTM with full synthetic and some maintain that it's too slick and should be swapped for mineral oil for the first 1,000 miles or so. Clearly a controversial topic, but the variability of this issue makes me wonder why.

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I would say it has somthing to do with manufacturing inconsistencys. With VW the problem was that some of the blocks were cast with an extra hard iron. They would burn oil for the 1st 20k miles or so. I pulled the head off one of these engines at 245k miles and you could still see the crosshatching in the cylinders.
All the European cars use full synthetic from new so I don't know if you can blame that.
Also according to the European car brands I work on less then 1qt per 5k miles is considered ok. Think of that in vw terms. A GTI has 5qt of oil and 10k mile oil change intervals. You could run out twice. The later turbo vws were also burning oil (more then a qt per 5k.) and we were re ringing the cars at the dealer under warranty. Seemed to fix them.

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7 hours ago, Brian Cole said:

I would say it has somthing to do with manufacturing inconsistencys. With VW the problem was that some of the blocks were cast with an extra hard iron. They would burn oil for the 1st 20k miles or so. I pulled the head off one of these engines at 245k miles and you could still see the crosshatching in the cylinders.
All the European cars use full synthetic from new so I don't know if you can blame that.
Also according to the European car brands I work on less then 1qt per 5k miles is considered ok. Think of that in vw terms. A GTI has 5qt of oil and 10k mile oil change intervals. You could run out twice. The later turbo vws were also burning oil (more then a qt per 5k.) and we were re ringing the cars at the dealer under warranty. Seemed to fix them.

In bold. :thumbsup:

With new bikes, or trucks for that matter, I've never had an oil burning issue in over 45+ years. I've always mostly ignored break in instructions and just rode normally. Perhaps I'm lucky? 

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Pretty skeptical of "manufacturing variances" being the culprit. 50 years ago, sure. But with modern mfrg processes, components & their assembly are as consistent has they've ever been.

Sure. And things are so much better. But if vw, the largest car company in the world can screw up then a small company like KTM can too.

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