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Will a 230 motor fit in a 200r frame?

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Yes, I had an 83 and adapted KTM pegs to it easily, so I was unpleasantly surprised to see that the newer frames used a completely different setup.

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New seat built. The new seat with the seat base is lighter than just the stock foam.
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Can't remember if you already mentioned this, but what foam and base did you use? I'd love to give my XR200 seat a more modern/flatter design. It's nice and plush, but I hate that I'm always sliding forward and down into the tank because the stock seat is sloped so much.

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10 hours ago, mx4god said:

Can't remember if you already mentioned this, but what foam and base did you use? I'd love to give my XR200 seat a more modern/flatter design. It's nice and plush, but I hate that I'm always sliding forward and down into the tank because the stock seat is sloped so much.

I used the stock seat base.  They are so model specific and intricate that it would be dificult to use something else.  This is the second seat I have made using closed cell foam flooring.  The puzzle piece 2'X2' kind.  I bought mine from HFT, but its easy to find. Then it is a matter of cutting it to fit the contours of the seat base and building up layers to the desired height.  I used "super 77" spray glue on the first one and regular contact cement from a quart can on this one.  I did rough shaping with a 4 1/2" grinder with flap disk, and finish work with an auto body file board with 40 grit.  The closed cell foam shapes and sands reasonably well.

This foam is pretty stiff, so I inset a 1 1/2" strip of open cell foam down the middle. That gives a nice spot for my old tail bone, and the harder foam gives support for my sit bones.  The cover is made from the bulk cover material that factory effex sells.  It has worked well on my '82 so I felt comfortable going ahead and doing the same thing on the new project.  It has many many hours of labor in it at this point, but I only have to do it once, well, until the next time.

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I used the stock seat base.  They are so model specific and intricate that it would be dificult to use something else.  This is the second seat I have made using closed cell foam flooring.  The puzzle piece 2'X2' kind.  I bought mine from HFT, but its easy to find. Then it is a matter of cutting it to fit the contours of the seat base and building up layers to the desired height.  I used "super 77" spray glue on the first one and regular contact cement from a quart can on this one.  I did rough shaping with a 4 1/2" grinder with flap disk, and finish work with an auto body file board with 40 grit.  The closed cell foam shapes and sands reasonably well.
This foam is pretty stiff, so I inset a 1 1/2" strip of open cell foam down the middle. That gives a nice spot for my old tail bone, and the harder foam gives support for my sit bones.  The cover is made from the bulk cover material that factory effex sells.  It has worked well on my '82 so I felt comfortable going ahead and doing the same thing on the new project.  It has many many hours of labor in it at this point, but I only have to do it once, well, until the next time.


Awesome, thanks for the detailed reply. I'll keep this in mind if I ever decide to mod my XR seat.

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Went back and forth on what skid plate I wanted to run. Decided to go with the '84 style. It gives reasonable protection and is the lightest.
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On 1/22/2017 at 5:16 PM, chadzu said:

Chassis pretty much figured out. Now to blow it all back apart and work on finish.

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nice work chadzu.....im enjoying the post.....so is that the good setup rear tire wise.....i see a lot of people using trials for rear tires.......is there a reason? why not a knobby?

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On ‎3‎/‎4‎/‎2017 at 0:32 PM, joethumper said:

nice work chadzu.....im enjoying the post.....so is that the good setup rear tire wise.....i see a lot of people using trials for rear tires.......is there a reason? why not a knobby?

There are a few reasons why I like the trials tire.

First off the MT43 is DOT rated so I'm road leagal with my plated bikes.

They seem to do less trail damage. I ride lots of multiple use trail systems and the trials tires seem to have less impact on the trails.

Traction is great in most real world trail conditions. 

They last a long time.

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2 hours ago, chadzu said:

There are a few reasons why I like the trials tire.

First off the MT43 is DOT rated so I'm road leagal with my plated bikes.

They seem to do less trail damage. I ride lots of multiple use trail systems and the trials tires seem to have less impact on the trails.

Traction is great in most real world trail conditions. 

They last a long time.

thanks for taking the time to answer my question......i am enlightened !!!!!!!!!!!!

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I wanted to see how far I could shorten the 96-04 xr250r shock. I had previously taken an inch out. That one really is supposed to live on the '82. For the new project I wanted to push the limit a bit. I decided to try 1.125". I had to get into the link quite a bit for clearance. I think it will be ok, but I'm going to be keeping a close eye on it.
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Wow, nice work, that might be enough for near stock ride height.  I did a similar mod but also moved the upper shock mount on the frame.

From my notes the 96-04 XR250R shock is 14 3/4" center to center, the 84-91 XR200R shock is 13 1/2" c-c, so if you used 84-85 linkage ride height would be very close to 86-91 XR200R. When I was fussin with adapting 96+ linkage and swing arm I ground clearance on the dogbone for the shock rather than grinding the shock. 

The late 250 shock is next gen from the 84-91 XR200R shock and is a big improvement in handling, I was able to go back to a stock XR200R spring, had to grind out the ID on one end of the spring to fit the larger shock body.   I put the reservoir on the left side and drilled a hole in the left side cover for access to the compression clicker.

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Edited by Chuck.
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Mounted the electronics up and out of the way. Using 230 coil, cdi, and trailtech reg/rec
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Battery box and battery. Should be reasonably safe and out of the majority of the heat and vibration.
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On 2/21/2017 at 8:43 AM, chadzu said:

I used the stock seat base.  They are so model specific and intricate that it would be dificult to use something else.  This is the second seat I have made using closed cell foam flooring.  The puzzle piece 2'X2' kind.  I bought mine from HFT, but its easy to find. Then it is a matter of cutting it to fit the contours of the seat base and building up layers to the desired height.  I used "super 77" spray glue on the first one and regular contact cement from a quart can on this one.  I did rough shaping with a 4 1/2" grinder with flap disk, and finish work with an auto body file board with 40 grit.  The closed cell foam shapes and sands reasonably well.

This foam is pretty stiff, so I inset a 1 1/2" strip of open cell foam down the middle. That gives a nice spot for my old tail bone, and the harder foam gives support for my sit bones.  The cover is made from the bulk cover material that factory effex sells.  It has worked well on my '82 so I felt comfortable going ahead and doing the same thing on the new project.  It has many many hours of labor in it at this point, but I only have to do it once, well, until the next time.

I have found an electric knife works great to cut foam. Picked up an old one for a couple bucks at a yard sale.

Proctor-Silex-Stainless-Steel-Electric-Knife-with-One-Touch-Button-Control-Lightweight-with-Contoured-Handle-Dishwasher-Safe-Blades.jpg

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You can knock off another pound or two due to the strap holding the bike, can't ya??

Idk, maybe a pound.
There are still a few things that I want to do that will take a bit off.
I got to ride it today and it's better than I had hoped. Grin from ear to ear.
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