Lighter Clutch Springs 3 vs 6

I ordered some WR250 clutch springs to fit into my WR450 to give easier clutch pull so that I can learn better control and reduce hand fatigue. I don't weigh much and I am not doing steep hill climbs so from what I have read in the various threads on this subject, putting in light clutch springs should not generally cause an issue with clutch slip.

 

The question is whether I should go with 3 or 6. I wondered if there was a problem with putting in just 3 lighter springs as surely the 3 original springs would be putting more pressure and therefore increased stress in just three places on the clutch hub? Is this ever a problem? Also would putting in all 6 lighter springs lead to clutch slip in just normal riding conditions?

 

Finally I have read about the washer mod, putting washers inside the springs to effectively raise the clutch hub towers and create a larger recess for the spring when at full compression. I was planning to do this with my stock springs, but now I am putting in lighter springs would it be a good idea to still do this or will this further reduce the spring pressure and cause problems?

 

thanks

No way..... do the clutch lever mod. Move your cable closer to the pivot point.

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3 is fine

6 is fine too, if you don't weigh to much

A new cable works wonders

A lower leverage perch helps a lot

 

...but the only thing that really makes a difference is doing the clutch hub 'swiss cheese' mod.

 

Makes it feel like a 125 clutch...

I just drill a counter sink hole for the cable barrel closer to the pivot point. Then drill an 1/8 hole and dremel groove for cable. Pulls like butter. Even my backup perch is moded.

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I have done both the washer mod and drilled my clutch hub (at different times), both of which made a noticeable difference in the smoothness and engagement feel of the clutch, not so much the pull force in my case. I honestly thought the stock WR450 springs were fairly light on the stock clutch. I am currently running a Rekluse EXP 3.0 disc with the heavier Rekluse springs in the WR and it makes the clutch pull stupidly heavy. I think I might have to try drilling out an extra clutch lever and see if that helps.

Different bike, but I put an ARC DC8 clutch perch and reduced leverage ratio lever on my YZ250 and it is stupidly light...about as light as any hydro clutch I've tried -- highly, highly recommended. Only reason I'm not buying one for my WR is because I plan to hopefully move up to a 16+ YZFX or WR here at some point, and don't want to over-invest in this bike (as I drop $200 in carb mods/repairs...whatever). As a side note, that ARC clutch perch on my YZ250 is the right part number for the new bikes as well, so that will get moved over as soon as I finally bring one home.

Thanks for the replies. I have also been doing some more reading through some of the 'clutch pull' threads and have drawn out the following information but would be grateful if you guys could confirm whether I have understood correctly.

 

Am I right in thinking that drilling a new hole in the stock lever is no use if the cable exits in the same place as you are not actually changing the geometory. But drilling a new hole reduces the pull if the cable exits in a straight line through a new created channel closer  to the pivot point, but the travel is less than original so does not fully disengage the clutch on some bikes?

 

Krannie can you explain what a "lower leverage perch" is and maybe give me a specific product to look up. I am not sure what is available over here in the UK. Do these levers allow easier pull without reducing the length of the pull, and therefore solve the disengaging problem of the stock free clutch lever mod (drilling new hole)?

 

Rocker I found your thread on the clutch hub swiss cheese mod, it is helpful thanks. I didn't realise that people did this to the hub, I thought this was what people did to the basket. Especially as the fingers on the aftermarket baskets have big holes in them. Is the ARC DC8 create an easier pull but still pull the cable the same length to fully disengage the clutch.

 

I think I will try 6 lighter springs until I have had more practice with the clutch and handling of the bike and then maybe move to just three lighter springs after that. I find the clutch pull on my bike heavy. It is okay just riding along and shifting on flat terrain but slowing down etc I don't feel I have good enough control with the weight of the pull there.

Drilling on the clutch lever works, did it on many bikes. Try it for 8 bucks on the cost of a lever, you'll see.

Thanks for the replies. I have also been doing some more reading through some of the 'clutch pull' threads and have drawn out the following information but would be grateful if you guys could confirm whether I have understood correctly.

Am I right in thinking that drilling a new hole in the stock lever is no use if the cable exits in the same place as you are not actually changing the geometory. But drilling a new hole reduces the pull if the cable exits in a straight line through a new created channel closer to the pivot point, but the travel is less than original so does not fully disengage the clutch on some bikes?

Krannie can you explain what a "lower leverage perch" is and maybe give me a specific product to look up. I am not sure what is available over here in the UK. Do these levers allow easier pull without reducing the length of the pull, and therefore solve the disengaging problem of the stock free clutch lever mod (drilling new hole)?

Rocker I found your thread on the clutch hub swiss cheese mod, it is helpful thanks. I didn't realise that people did this to the hub, I thought this was what people did to the basket. Especially as the fingers on the aftermarket baskets have big holes in them. Is the ARC DC8 create an easier pull but still pull the cable the same length to fully disengage the clutch.

I think I will try 6 lighter springs until I have had more practice with the clutch and handling of the bike and then maybe move to just three lighter springs after that. I find the clutch pull on my bike heavy. It is okay just riding along and shifting on flat terrain but slowing down etc I don't feel I have good enough control with the weight of the pull there.

Ultimately if it's slipping with the 6 lighter springs, just take it back and throw in 3 heavier ones to see if it fixes it, pretty easy for that one.

The ARC perch makes the clutch action extremely smooth because tolerances between the lever and perch are much tighter. I believe it's also on a bearing at the pivot, so that reduces friction a lot right there. But they also offer a reduced ratio lever, which I got, that mechanically reduces the pull force, same concept as drilling out a stock lever, at the cost of requiring a greater pull distance to disengage the clutch. It's not a crazy amount, maybe 1/2" or so increased lever travel, but more than worth it when you get true one-finger operation in return. Add in the nice comfy wide feel of the Memlon material they make their stuff out of and it's a win-win-win all around. Best to get it straight from ARC to specify the pull ratio you want.

Anyone have a pic of their drilled out stock lever?

I've never heard of doing that....but I don't get out much either.

"Swiss Cheese Mod"

 

I have been reading about this mod and would really like to have a go at this because I have a dragging clutch and it really irritates me. Is there any agreement out there on how many holes are ideal, how many are too much and where to drill them.

 

I have read two different threads with different techniques. Some only drilling holes in the oil channel ribs where there are already holes and some drilling holes in other ribs as well.

 

I just want to make sure I do it once and properly. Also is there no need to drill holes in the clutch basket, is it only the hub that is drilled?

Yes it works

More holes is better

Steels need to be unwarped, cable and perch must not be worn out

Add a lower leverage lever and it is one finger all day long

"Swiss Cheese Mod"

 

I have been reading about this mod and would really like to have a go at this because I have a dragging clutch and it really irritates me. Is there any agreement out there on how many holes are ideal, how many are too much and where to drill them.

 

I have read two different threads with different techniques. Some only drilling holes in the oil channel ribs where there are already holes and some drilling holes in other ribs as well.

 

I just want to make sure I do it once and properly. Also is there no need to drill holes in the clutch basket, is it only the hub that is drilled?

What McKranface said. Bottom line, in my opinion, is that it's not a scientific process. It can be made scientific, but in the end, you're just adding more holes so in theory more oil can flow out to your clutch plates. There is a limit, obviously to how many holes is the exact right number, since only so much oil flows into the center hub area, and whether it's 6 holes like the factory gave you, 18 holes like I ended up with, or 100, the point is to get more oil to the clutch plates. 100 holes and you may incur some structural issues in the hub, despite the great oil flow, so I wouldn't recommend that - or maybe not, I don't know, that's the science part. And I don't know that how you space them is critical either, just add some holes. My mild OCD required me to do symmetrically even patterns on different spacings, but it's really not important.

Rocker I have read your thread about drilling the clutch hub and I do prefer your method of drilling more holes primarily to the areas where there are oil channels. I may also add a few others between the channels along other ribs.

 

It seems that people aren't really drilling the clutch baskets. I assume that the clutch hub drilling is sufficient to make the clutch operate better.

 

Just to be clear is the clutch lever drilling mod the same (but cheaper) as buying a lower leverage lever?

Rocker I have read your thread about drilling the clutch hub and I do prefer your method of drilling more holes primarily to the areas where there are oil channels. I may also add a few others between the channels along other ribs.

It seems that people aren't really drilling the clutch baskets. I assume that the clutch hub drilling is sufficient to make the clutch operate better.

Just to be clear is the clutch lever drilling mod the same (but cheaper) as buying a lower leverage lever?

I think the most important thing you can do for the basket is make sure the channels where the plates all contact are nice and smooth so everything moves easily there. They get notched there over time and you can file them smooth. With the lever, yeah it's just moving the pivot point to change the leverage ratio. I've never drilled one myself, but that's the deal there.

Don't go drilling oil holes for easy clutch lever,, major overkill man. Just get the reduced lever, or use your dremmel at home, a drill too, and move that point closer to pivot..... a vise, a drill with 1/8 bit, and bit dia. Of your barrel on cable end, and dremmel.... 15-20 min.. not hard... even if you mess up it still works... I take time to make it smooth where the cable lays on lever. But it don't matter much.

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I have 3 WR250 springs in my clutch pack. Under hard acceleration in 4th and 5th gear I get a bit of slippage. I do like the lighter clutch pull.

 

I'll probably put the original clutch springs back and try changing the clutch lever pivot point.

I'm sure there is also slippage that you can't feel.

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