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3v battery keeps dying.

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I have a 2016 300rr and the battery on the factory gauge made by trail tech keeps dying every couple rides. My last bike I put a trail tech gauge on it and for other reasons I soldered a 3v battery pack to the internal battery leads. I was going to do this so that I have a larger capacity 3v battery on the bike. However I wanted to solder a 12v to 3v step down converter directly off of the main battery on the bike. The current Nickle sized battery is 3v so I don't see any issues but what do you guys think. The battery pack on the other bike worked like a charm but I have to swap the battery's every now and then. With the converter is a no maintenance solution. As long as the battery is good

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I have a 2016 300rr and the battery on the factory gauge made by trail tech keeps dying every couple rides. My last bike I put a trail tech gauge on it and for other reasons I soldered a 3v battery pack to the internal battery leads. I was going to do this so that I have a larger capacity 3v battery on the bike. However I wanted to solder a 12v to 3v step down converter directly off of the main battery on the bike. The current Nickle sized battery is 3v so I don't see any issues but what do you guys think. The battery pack on the other bike worked like a charm but I have to swap the battery's every now and then. With the converter is a no maintenance solution. As long as the battery is good

There's no reason to do all that, contact you're Beta dealer. There's been quite a few faulty Trail Tech units in 2016 that will drain the 3v battery. They are replaceable under warranty even if your out of the 6 months threshold, if the unit itself is found to be the problem.

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It already gets its power from the main 12v bike battery, yours just lost that power so it's eating up the backup battery.  One of mine did that and all I did was clean the connectors with contact cleaner and put some dialectric grease in them and never had an issue again. 

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I have a 2016 300rr and the battery on the factory gauge made by trail tech keeps dying every couple rides. My last bike I put a trail tech gauge on it and for other reasons I soldered a 3v battery pack to the internal battery leads. I was going to do this so that I have a larger capacity 3v battery on the bike. However I wanted to solder a 12v to 3v step down converter directly off of the main battery on the bike. The current Nickle sized battery is 3v so I don't see any issues but what do you guys think. The battery pack on the other bike worked like a charm but I have to swap the battery's every now and then. With the converter is a no maintenance solution. As long as the battery is good

Welcome to Beta. Simple petty issue but still an issue. Our XT as well as my past 350rr runs 3 months on a battery. Other bikes with similar gauge run years. As posted above check connector, check ALL connectors and add dielectric grease.

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When I spoke to BETA about my issue with the battery being drained, they said the most likely cause was a bad battery.

My dealer said the same thing.

They tested my unit with a known good battery, and with all four of the 'new' batteries I left with them.

All four of the 'new' batteries were dead in a few hours.

Their battery worked for 10 days.

 

They suggested NOT buying your battery at right aid, CVS, etc, but on line from a 'battery store'. 

 

I bought a new energizer battery on amazon, and it has been working for months.

 

Seems odd, but it worked.

 

If you have a multimeter that measures milliamps in DC, you can test the battery before you install it.

The battery rating is usually on the package or the battery.

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When I spoke to BETA about my issue with the battery being drained, they said the most likely cause was a bad battery.

My dealer said the same thing.

They tested my unit with a known good battery, and with all four of the 'new' batteries I left with them.

All four of the 'new' batteries were dead in a few hours.

Their battery worked for 10 days.

 

They suggested NOT buying your battery at right aid, CVS, etc, but on line from a 'battery store'. 

 

I bought a new energizer battery on amazon, and it has been working for months.

 

Seems odd, but it worked.

 

If you have a multimeter that measures milliamps in DC, you can test the battery before you install it.

The battery rating is usually on the package or the battery.

 

Honestly not trying to be critical of your post, but this makes no sense. So long as a battery is reasonably fresh (many coin cells are good until 2025 or some future stardate, lol), it should work, per spec, in the Voyager.

 

As Danceswithtrees pointed out, it sounds like the main power feed is faulty, and the small amp-hour coincell simply cannot handle the load required, especially powering the GPS functions, etc.

 

This is an uninformed WAG, but I am guessing that a better main power connection resulted when swapping to the Amazon battery?

 

What are we supposed to do when in remote areas, and the only battery option is from a taqueria or donkey show emporium? :naughty: Point being, if TrailTech designed these to be all uppity about where a battery comes from, that is a major design fubar.

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The dealer had the trailtech on their counter, not hooked up to a bike.

The only batteries that would not die were the ones he provided.

I went through 3 batteries prior to buying the other 4, assuming there was a bad connection, trying to diagnosis it with a volt meter.

 

Please note that  the battery is NOT a rechargable battery, and is not 'charged up' by the 12v lead on the trail tech.

 

...but it is required to be there for the trailtech to work...

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The dealer had the trailtech on their counter, not hooked up to a bike.

The only batteries that would not die were the ones he provided.

I went through 3 batteries prior to buying the other 4, assuming there was a bad connection, trying to diagnosis it with a volt meter.

 

Please note that  the battery is NOT a rechargable battery, and is not 'charged up' by the 12v lead on the trail tech.

 

...but it is required to be there for the trailtech to work...

 

Crazy! All I can think of is this:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TM-G0bkl8MQ

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I had the same problem.  Ate up several fresh batteries that I checked with a meter before installing.  Mine was not the battery freshness or the connectors and I doubt my gauge is different that normal production.  The gauge back light comes on when the motor is not running and quickly drains the watch battery because there is no 12v power when the motor is not running.  This includes rolling downhill without the motor running or pushing it around the garage.  This is how Beta designed it.  I fixed mine by adding a wire to the system that assures 12v power from the battery when the motor is not running.  No problem ever since this mod and I have never drained the 12v battery.

 

I suspect your gauge and bike wiring system is exactly as designed, not defective, and will continue to drain the watch battery if you don't do a mod similar to what I and others have done.

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Mine will also illuminate when engine off, and rolling it in the garage, but it goes back to sleep quickly afterwards.

 

Is there an internal setting to get it to sleep, or not?

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Well I didn't hook the gauge up to the buck step down converter but I hooked it up to the same battery pack from the other bike. Went for a long ride yesterday and it worked flawlessly. If the battery pack gets drained quickly then I know there is a bigger issue but so far so good. And it's really easy to do

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I had the same problem.  Ate up several fresh batteries that I checked with a meter before installing.  Mine was not the battery freshness or the connectors and I doubt my gauge is different that normal production.  The gauge back light comes on when the motor is not running and quickly drains the watch battery because there is no 12v power when the motor is not running.  This includes rolling downhill without the motor running or pushing it around the garage.  This is how Beta designed it.  I fixed mine by adding a wire to the system that assures 12v power from the battery when the motor is not running.  No problem ever since this mod and I have never drained the 12v battery.

 

I suspect your gauge and bike wiring system is exactly as designed, not defective, and will continue to drain the watch battery if you don't do a mod similar to what I and others have done.

Can you give any specifics on connecting the hard wired 12v source?

 

I mainly want to know where you tapped into the Voyager. What you did makes great sense to me.

 

Thanks

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My solution may be more complex than needed.  I have my reasons.  I have a 2016 250RR.

 

Check the wiring diagram first.  There is an open terminal tab on the fuse block.  Tap into the fused side, not the battery side, with a 18 awg wire and a terminal that fits the fuse block terminal.  The other side of the wire goes all the way to the front of the bike.  There is a turn signal flasher connector behind the headlight assembly.  You need to connect the wire to the terminal in the flasher connector that is the bike side wiring, not the turn signal side.  Once you do this, the bike is permanently "powered up" by the battery.  My reasons for doing this was: 1) no wires were cut to make a splice, 2) the added wire is protected by a fuse.

 

You can also add a switch.  I actually did this but it's not necessary.  I never turn the switch off and I've never had a dead 12v battery.  I ride at least every six weeks though.  If you have the bike in deep storage, you might want to add a switch or disconnect the battery.

 

There is probably a simpler way if you're willing to make a splice.

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Sounds like a good idea. Was the wire you connected to the head light flasher the ground wire. Then you ran a hot wire from the fuse block.

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I have a wiring diagram but TT doesn't allow my file types.  What file type are allowed?

 

Not sure about allowed extensions, but can you do a screendump to a .jpg or .png, etc.?

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OK, that worked.

 

The red line represents the jumper I added.  Item #20 is the flasher, which was not installed on my bike.  You can access the terminal that the flasher connects to.  Make sure to connect to the Rs side as shown.  What this essentially does is connect the Rs junction (highlighted in yellow) to the 12v battery through the fuse.  I think it's important to go through the fuse.  Works perfectly on my bike.

Jumper.jpg

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My '16 xtrainer has eaten two 3v batteries and only has 100 miles on it :(

 

Does anyone know how I can test my bike's wiring to see if I am getting 12v to the stock trip computer? I believe I need to test the red wire in the attached image but how are you supposed to get a test probe from a volt meter into that little hole?  I really don't want to cut the sheathing from any of the wires to test it.

 

Here is a photo of one of the three wire pigtail from the bikes harness that I believe is the power

IMG_7150.JPG

 

 

And one showing all pig tails coming off the gauge.

IMG_7151.JPG

 

 

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My '16 xtrainer has eaten two 3v batteries and only has 100 miles on it :(
 
Does anyone know how I can test my bike's wiring to see if I am getting 12v to the stock trip computer? I believe I need to test the red wire in the attached image but how are you supposed to get a test probe from a volt meter into that little hole?  I really don't want to cut the sheathing from any of the wires to test it.
 
Here is a photo of one of the three wire pigtail from the bikes harness that I believe is the power
 
 
And one showing all pig tails coming off the gauge.

 

I've used a safety pin to probe small holes my test lead wouldn't fit into, just hold the probe from the meter against the pin or use a lead with alligator clips on both ends and attach one to the safety pin and one to the meter pin. 

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