Braking tips?

I'm a teen girl who has been riding for about 2 years, and this past year I've started riding on the track with my 08 Suzuki rm85. The only thing I'm really unsure of is braking. The first problem is having trouble coordinating the throttle and the front brake lever, and I feel like I'm almost having trouble reaching it properly with my fingers. This results in me using the back brake way more than I should and neglecting the front brake completely. Being new it's hard for me to properly multitask with the clutch, throttle, front brake, back brake, and keeping my line, so I often find myself forgetting one of these and messing up my progress or someone else's. Any tips would be greatly appreciated!

How many fingers do you use when using the front brake? I use 2 fingers when braking, my pointer and my middle. Also do the same thing with the clutch. I almost never use the back brake at the track or off-road unless I must stop fast, just make sure when you use the front brake you always keep your arms stiff enough to ensure you don't turn your bars and slip. If you still have an issue with multi tasking, before you go on your ride try excessively using the brake, clutch, throttle, and back brake just to make sure you are warmed up for your ride. Also if you want, go ahead and try to doing small wheelies and make sure you use throttle control, the clutch to bring it up, then the back brake to bring the front down, it will make you a more skilled rider. Hope you found this helpful and keep riding

You should be working the levers - brake and clutch - with one finger. It may take time to develop the strength for this but it will come. Do it as much as you possibly can every time you ride and you eventually will get there.

 

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This exercise has helped me tremendously.

Just go find a quiet spot, empty lot, or carpark or even your back lawn, and practice stopping. Go, then stop, over and over 'till it feels natural. Simple, but it'll do wonders.

I use 2 fingers on the levers.

I'm a teen girl who has been riding for about 2 years, and this past year I've started riding on the track with my 08 Suzuki rm85. The only thing I'm really unsure of is braking. The first problem is having trouble coordinating the throttle and the front brake lever, and I feel like I'm almost having trouble reaching it properly with my fingers. This results in me using the back brake way more than I should and neglecting the front brake completely. Being new it's hard for me to properly multitask with the clutch, throttle, front brake, back brake, and keeping my line, so I often find myself forgetting one of these and messing up my progress or someone else's. Any tips would be greatly appreciated!

 

Sounds like you need to adjust your front levers. Not only can you adjust the up-down angle, but you can also adjust the distance from the grip. A single finger on the front brake leaves the rest to grip the throttle. Myself I find one finger on the front brake plent. If I used two, I would be over the bars often - LoL.

 

To expand upon Death_Inc's suggestion: Throw down two cones (or other markers) setting up an oval with just enough distance that you can get WOT but immediately have to go back to braking. You should be using both Front and Back brake during the hardest part of you braking going into a turn. When exiting a rut, you can drag the front brake a bit to help keep the front wheel down in the run. Also you are working the throttle and clutch, especially slipping the clutch to maintain control of the rear wheel and keeping the power up. Practice right turns until you get tired on that side. Switch to left, when you get tired go back to right. Take breaks as needed. You can do figure 8's as well but I like the repetitiveness of just right or just left until I get too tired to do them anymore.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pay attention to what he says around 3:10

Once you ditch the rear brake you still have the front if you need to fine tune speed a little.

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So GS vid says no coasting, brake then accelerate.   The next guy says brake early then coast into the turn. Great.

 

Also, why is it important to lift your foot off the peg to apply the rear brake? Seems like there is better modulation with the foot on the peg.

GS is right, and so is Doug Dubach. Dubach is describing entering a rut, which will hold the tires from sliding. On flat corners, if your rear tire is drifting outside your corner arc, the front tire is far less likely to slide out whether you're braking or accelerating. If you coast inbetween, your front tire is far more likely to wash out if you are near the limits of traction. The reasons are complex.

Trying to modulate your rear brake with your foot on the peg would require you to either have your rear brake pedal positioned very low, or your butt far back on the seat. Your ankle can only flex so far back to allow a forward body position (for cornering) and the ability to control the rear brake precisely. This is best done by lifting your foot from the peg as you press your right knee into the right shroud for stability as you control the brake pedal with ankle flexion. If you position your rear brake pedal low enough to do this while seated forward it will be too low to use to brake hard while standing with your body weight back. Watch any pro mx/sx racer to see how this works. While seated forward, they don't have their foot on the peg while using the rear brake pedal.

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Edited by motrock93b

I have been through training at MTF in Cairo GA and the way they taught braking is this.  Get on the balls of your feet, grip the bike good with your knees like around the air box.  Your body position should be like you are taking whoops, ass over the back, your back almost parallel to ground and gripping the bike. I can pretty much lock up the front brake and not go over the bars.  And you also don't want to grip hard, you want to keep your core stiff and grip with your legs.  What happens a lot of times is you brake hard and when you grip hard with hands you will end up putting pressure on the bars and putting too much weight on the front end.  You DON;T want your weight going forward when your braking.  As for the throttle, you should use one finger on the brake, and if you have too adjust your levers.  I had hard time at first cause my gloves would almost get caught on the throttle and I would brap the throttle when reaching for the break.  That just takes practice, but really helps when your not death gripping the bars, will also pretty much eliminate arm pump too.  I am 230lbs and while not a pro, I rarely get arm pump.

Guys got it covered here I was tought go in fast brake late . You'll beat that rider to the rut. Use both brakes together back one helps keep the rear down in breaking bumps. But mx is 90% front brake you gotta trust it. Goodluck???

That is true, a lot of guys use a lot of rear brake and unless you are coming in really hot, don't.  I have 110 hrs on my bike been through like 4-5 sets of front pads and still on original back pads with plenty of life.  70% of your braking power is in the front if you know how to use it.

I'm opposite would go over a season on rear brakes but 2 sets of fronts lol I've found that oem brake pads work much better also 

Sry pave I read that wrong lol

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