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2015 WR 250F in mountains?

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Coming to Colorado this summer to ride, was wondering if my WR 250F has enough power to ride at elevation. Have Yosh slip-on, competition ECU and 269 kit. Opinions?

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13 hours ago, Slamsanders said:

Think I'll be hugely disappointed with it after riding 300 2-strokes and carbureted 450's? 

Your 250 should be fine.  Nothing is as light and powerful as a 2-stroke -- but that doesn't mean you cannot get adequate performance out of your little thumper.

I ride a WR450 but many of the guys I ride with are on 250 4-strokes.  In the desert, the big bore and 2-strokes bikes will perform better because of their power advantage, but mountain riding here has very little full-throttle action. Technical riding makes up a lot of the cowtrailing we do in the mountains.

Your 250 may actually have an advantage in the technical terrain over some of the 400cc and larger bikes because it is lighter. 

 

Where will you be riding?

 

Make sure you get a CO state OHV sticker -- the FS and CPW folks are checking them regularly.  Besides... the 25 bucks goes to trail maintenance and improvement grants. 

 

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Your 250 should be fine.  Nothing is as light and powerful as a 2-stroke -- but that doesn't mean you cannot get adequate performance out of your little thumper.
I ride a WR450 but many of the guys I ride with are on 250 4-strokes.  In the desert, the big bore and 2-strokes bikes will perform better because of their power advantage, but mountain riding here has very little full-throttle action. Technical riding makes up a lot of the cowtrailing we do in the mountains.
Your 250 may actually have an advantage in the technical terrain over some of the 400cc and larger bikes because it is lighter. 
 
Where will you be riding?
 
Make sure you get a CO state OHV sticker -- the FS and CPW folks are checking them regularly.  Besides... the 25 bucks goes to trail maintenance and improvement grants. 
 


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Will be riding around Buena Vista. Timberline trail, Star trail and others around there, Flag mountain. Yeah I'm just really concerned about loss of power at altitude. Haven't ever ridden a FI bike there. But know my carbed big bore bikes suffered. And yeah always have my CO sticker before I get there.

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I rode 3400 miles on a WR250 all last year in Colorado with the GYTR kit, and did the airbox mod and exhaust mod. It will be plenty fast on the trails. It might lack some speed on the roads if you are trying to keep up with bigger bikes. EFI is a life saver compared to the carbed bikes

Edited by dspect89

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Just make sure your jetted correctly.  You will loose a little horsepower but your trail riding... Not racing.. so you shouldn't have any issues.  I ride a KTM 200 and of course I notice the power loss at around 12000 feet, but I have never had any problems.  Even my daughter used to ride her yz80 up here with no problems.

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Ok, thanks for the input guys. I'm gonna bring the WR 250F and give it a go. If it doesn't satisfy me I'll bring a 450 next time.

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It was all in the mountains around the state. The only time I ran into some loss of power was when i hit 13,800 feet elevation

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General rule of thumb for altitude HP loss is 3% for every 1000ft of elevation. So a bike with 30hp at sea level will have 30% less power at 10,000ft. YES, you will notice it. enjoy the riding, you'll soon forget about horsepower. My wife and oldest daughter are on 250 4 strokes, and youngest on a 230 4 stroke. they can still climb to American Flag (12,707') without issue. 

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I've thought every bike I've ever ridden there has struggled there. That's why I'm worried about bringing a 250F there. Even tho it's fuel injected. Guess I'm just used to riding in Kansas at an elevation of about 500 feet.

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With EFI and your mods, I'd think you'd be fine. My son's carb'd 2007 WR250 doesn't quite cut it, for him, but he tends to lug it too low in the rpm range.  More aggressive throttle would fix that.

The EFI should help a lot.  If in doubt, consider losing a tooth or two from the year perhaps?

I rode a 2005 DRZ 400 out on parts of timberline and thought it was marginal at best, but it was geared 3 teeth too high.

On the weight, the 250 and 450 aren't really that different.  At altitude, I do strongly prefer the 450 I have now, but then I ride like my kid and don't use the power a 250 has very well. The 450 is a substitute for lack of skill.  I really don't think the weight difference is material. 

Your call, but up high I do prefer the additional grunt of an EFI 450.

 

 

 

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On 3/18/2017 at 8:22 AM, mrgem said:

Your 250 should be fine.  Nothing is as light and powerful as a 2-stroke -- but that doesn't mean you cannot get adequate performance out of your little thumper.

I ride a WR450 but many of the guys I ride with are on 250 4-strokes.  In the desert, the big bore and 2-strokes bikes will perform better because of their power advantage, but mountain riding here has very little full-throttle action. Technical riding makes up a lot of the cowtrailing we do in the mountains.

Your 250 may actually have an advantage in the technical terrain over some of the 400cc and larger bikes because it is lighter. 

 

Where will you be riding?

 

Make sure you get a CO state OHV sticker -- the FS and CPW folks are checking them regularly.  Besides... the 25 bucks goes to trail maintenance and improvement grants. 

 

Also, make certain you are spark arrested (fs approved) and have current maps for areas you plan on riding. Have seen other out of state riders (not saying you will) causing conflict by either riding wrong direction on directional trails or heading for stuff that was closed due to not being well informed. Have fun. G

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On 3/20/2017 at 4:15 PM, Slamsanders said:

I've thought every bike I've ever ridden there has struggled there. That's why I'm worried about bringing a 250F there. Even tho it's fuel injected. Guess I'm just used to riding in Kansas at an elevation of about 500 feet.

Some people will claim that it doesn't matter and that isn't not that bad.  But the facts are, as mentioned above, ~3% loss for every 1Kft.  So you're looking at 25-40% loss, which is pretty massive.

I live at 10Kft and ride my 300 from 9-13Kft and I'm always looking for ways to get back my lost power.  In fact right now my engine is getting a 330 big bore and port work (already has increased compression, smart carb and it's been geared down two teeth).

The power loss will not stop you getting anywhere, but it will take some of the fun out of riding IME.  Best thing you can do, get the jetting right and drop 2t from the rear sprocket [edit: should have said *add* two teeth, not drop two teeth].  Or if possible bring a 300 2t or 450-500 4t.

Good luck and have fun.  Take lots of pics.

Edited by Colorado^

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Some people will claim that it doesn't matter and that isn't not that bad.  But the facts are, as mentioned above, ~3% loss for every 1Kft.  So you're looking at 25-40% loss, which is pretty massive.
I live at 10Kft and ride my 300 from 9-13Kft and I'm always looking for ways to get back my lost power.  In fact right now my engine is getting a 330 big bore and port work (already has increased compression, smart carb and it's been geared down two teeth).
The power loss will not stop you getting anywhere, but it will take some of the fun out of riding IME.  Best thing you can do, get the jetting right and drop 2t from the rear sprocket.  Or if possible bring a 300 2t or 450-500 4t.
Good luck and have fun.  Take lots of pics.


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Some people will claim that it doesn't matter and that isn't not that bad.  But the facts are, as mentioned above, ~3% loss for every 1Kft.  So you're looking at 25-40% loss, which is pretty massive.
I live at 10Kft and ride my 300 from 9-13Kft and I'm always looking for ways to get back my lost power.  In fact right now my engine is getting a 330 big bore and port work (already has increased compression, smart carb and it's been geared down two teeth).
The power loss will not stop you getting anywhere, but it will take some of the fun out of riding IME.  Best thing you can do, get the jetting right and drop 2t from the rear sprocket.  Or if possible bring a 300 2t or 450-500 4t.
Good luck and have fun.  Take lots of pics.


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Yeah I think I'll try and get another 450 before I come out. Been riding Colorado since the 90's but never on a 250F. I'm sure it could get around like you said but I'm all about the fun factor.

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