Jump to content

Recommended Posts

So I've got a 17 ktm 300 xcw and I'm just about the 30hr mark and my front brakes just became real soft over night. To the point where I have pressure but i can pull the lever to the bars just not very easily. But there is no leak and the master cylinder is still full. Any thoughts? I haven't had time to fool with it yet so I've come here for some ideas. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The front brake would randomly go soft on my last KTM just like yours.  You could bleed it out and push some new fluid through it, which is good to do now and then anyways, or tape or zip tie the lever to the bars and leave it overnight.  for whatever reason that would bring mine back to life almost everytime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Danceswithtrees said:

The front brake would randomly go soft on my last KTM just like yours.  You could bleed it out and push some new fluid through it, which is good to do now and then anyways, or tape or zip tie the lever to the bars and leave it overnight.  for whatever reason that would bring mine back to life almost everytime.

I'll give it a shot, thanks. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎3‎/‎23‎/‎2017 at 2:42 PM, Danceswithtrees said:

The front brake would randomly go soft on my last KTM just like yours.  You could bleed it out and push some new fluid through it, which is good to do now and then anyways, or tape or zip tie the lever to the bars and leave it overnight.  for whatever reason that would bring mine back to life almost everytime.

This is problematic on the Brembo  brakes on the KTM bikes.  The Zip Tie does work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just make sure the master is at the highest point.  It should only take about 15 minutes for the air to make its way up  in need to do that ony my 525.  Sometimes it will go out when the bike is on it side and the lever is pulled while it is down.  It happened the other day with my clutch on my 250 and it was good to go in 2 minutes after I tipped over towards the other side.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They find ways to get air into them when they are down it seems.  as your pads wear a little bit and the pistons extend out further,  and the fluid level drops a little, it happens easier and easier.   If you set the bike on a stand or against something so the master cylinder reservoir is as level as possible,  and pry the piston side pad back and compress the piston back into the caliper it will clear itself a lot of the time.   If I am in the shop when I do that, I pour more fluid into the reservoir as I slowly pump the pad back out to the disk.  If I get air in brake on the trail, I put the bike into a position where the reservoir is level and do the piston compression with the cover on the reservoir.  I don't know why,  but I end up doing that about twice as often for back brakes as I do front brakes.  It works on either one all the times I have tried it,  and when trying to bleed a set of brakes on a goldwing it finally worked on it when nothing else seemed to (you need to take the caliper off of the forks sometimes,  pump until the piston extends a little further than usual (make sure you have a stop for it, just thinner than the disk)  and compress back with a clamp in my case).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×