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Front Pinch flat

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Ever wonder how much air is really safe for a front pinch flat?

 

I thought 16 psi was more than safe, but hitting a concrete square edge at 4o mph, made me change my mind. The hit didn't even feel that hard. This was also original oem front tube with over 500 hours on it. Anyway, lost air instantly as I felt the vagueness in the front tire, made it about couple hundred yards, thinking I can ride it home. But it really got flat then and Im 40 mph heading for a telephone pole that Im trying to miss. No control what so ever, couldn't even push the bike. So had to call a tow truck, $80 bucks, one place wanted $220(that was nuts), I was only about 6 or 7 miles from the house.

I was headed home anyway, but  the pinch put two identical slits in the sidewall of the tube. no damage to the rim, just the tube.

Edited by Spud786

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I agree on the tubliss. I run 9 lbs in my front tire and hit everything imaginable in the desert, and everything means tons of rocks. Never a issue with tubliss.

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Tubesaddle product is designed to address this. Once installed no more maintenance of checking air in your tube like tubliss.

No pinch flats since I started using this product over two years ago. even with a rear trials tire at 9 psi, from Montana to Mexico.

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Front flats have been so rare for me, especially pinch flats, (rear quite the opposite as far as flats).  All though I ugraded the rear to heavier tubes,  the front I liked the oem for the lighter weight. I hit the edge of a large grated culvert, I'll have to go back and look at it , once I saw the tire was going down, I immediately headed to the house. Shocked it was totally unridable or pushable. Heavier tube may have aided that, like the rear.  Normally my flats are nails, which I believe would quickly eat a tubless depending on the length.

I have this down hill ravine , that has large open cross ruts from rain wash, that I luv to test my suspension on , I was off my line alittle, and I guess I caught the edge of this culvert , at the bottom.

My sport bike I carry an electric pump and plugs , but with tube type tires, just not thrilled with trying to fix on the side of the road, but tow trucks can get expensive very quickly.

My wife wasn't home, also cant drive my standard shift truck, so had limited options to get me to the house.

Im running a radial front tube now(the new tube), not sure if any better than the oem on a pinch flat, but I don't consider those the normal flat with the pressures I run.

Other wise may have to look into something like the tubliss for workable flat protection.

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10 hours ago, sirthumpalot said:

Time to go Tubliss! ;) 

 

6 hours ago, Deepseadan said:

I agree on the tubliss. I run 9 lbs in my front tire and hit everything imaginable in the desert, and everything means tons of rocks. Never a issue with tubliss.

There's a lot of haters on Tubliss.  I for one, am a believer!  

I run about 11ish in fronts and rears, and have been lower than that, and have NEVER had any issues.  

As far as the nail thing goes, you're correct that a LONG nail could indeed puncture / ruin the inner TUBE, but it shouldn't ruin the actual liner.  That has to be such a rare occurrence, that I don't even know if I would consider that an issue.  If it does, then you're in the EXACT same spot that you were on this day.  Buy a new $10 tube and start over.  BUT, if you do get a small nail that causes you to go down, all you need to carry is a plug kit and a hand pump, and you're back in business in less than 15 minutes.

I recently changed out my tires for the first time since I've gone Tubliss, and that process was the same as it is with a tube tire for the most part.  I actually changed my front tire:  off the bike, tire changed, and back on the bike in around 20 minutes.  I couldn't believe it...

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17 hours ago, Spud786 said:

Ever wonder how much air is really safe for a front pinch flat?

 

I thought 16 psi was more than safe, but hitting a concrete square edge at 4o mph, made me change my mind. The hit didn't even feel that hard. This was also original oem front tube with over 500 hours on it. Anyway, lost air instantly as I felt the vagueness in the front tire, made it about couple hundred yards, thinking I can ride it home. But it really got flat then and Im 40 mph heading for a telephone pole that Im trying to miss. No control what so ever, couldn't even push the bike. So had to call a tow truck, $80 bucks, one place wanted $220(that was nuts), I was only about 6 or 7 miles from the house.

I was headed home anyway, but  the pinch put two identical slits in the sidewall of the tube. no damage to the rim, just the tube.

 Was the pinch on top of the rimlock? Did you unweight the front end at all or were you just sitting down and riding? Be sure to check your rim for damage at the impact point, check spoke tension too.

Edited by motovita

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As it turned out, went back to the location, couldn't  find any square edge concrete, there was a 4 inch long 2 inch diameter bolt protruding out of the concrete, Id say that is what I hit.

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On ‎3‎/‎26‎/‎2017 at 9:42 AM, motovita said:

 Was the pinch on top of the rimlock? Did you unweight the front end at all or were you just sitting down and riding? Be sure to check your rim for damage at the impact point, check spoke tension too.

didnt look like a rim lock pinch, (2) ,  1/4 inch slits on the side of the tube, one directly above the other.

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