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If by power shifting you mean holding the throttle steady (usually wide open) then using the clutch to change gears, probably is no better or worse for the transmission.  The engine will certainly rev higher when you pull in the clutch to change gears, and then the clutch will have to bring the engine rpm's back down.

There's likely no hard data on your question, but all my bikes, 2-stroke and 4-stroke, get Mobil 1 Synthetic ATF in the transmissions.  I only ride/race Mx, and start in 3rd.  Once rolling, I rarely use the clutch to shift.  As of to date, no clutch or transmission failures.  My 2014 250SX has 220 hours on the original clutch; (and crank).

This is my personal experience, and may have no bearing on your question.

Everyone's experience will vary.

What type of riding do you do, and what type/class of rider are you?

 

 

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If by power shifting you mean holding the throttle steady (usually wide open) then using the clutch to change gears, probably is no better or worse for the transmission.  The engine will certainly rev higher when you pull in the clutch to change gears, and then the clutch will have to bring the engine rpm's back down.
There's likely no hard data on your question, but all my bikes, 2-stroke and 4-stroke, get Mobil 1 Synthetic ATF in the transmissions.  I only ride/race Mx, and start in 3rd.  Once rolling, I rarely use the clutch to shift.  As of to date, no clutch or transmission failures.  My 2014 250SX has 220 hours on the original clutch; (and crank).
This is my personal experience, and may have no bearing on your question.
Everyone's experience will vary.
What type of riding do you do, and what type/class of rider are you?
 
 


I mostly ride trails but i also ride a lot of mx

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power shifting will cause more wear and tear on clutch, engine, tranny, etc. than normal shifting.. that's like asking if redlining your engine is worse than keeping it mid rpm... some will never see a failure doing so while others will see a failure rather quickly.. all depends on maintenance and a bit of luck.. i don't do it cause i don't have money to fix something if it should break..

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Meh doesn't really matter. The biggest thing with power shifting or shifting with out the clutch is being smooth with it and not slamming/forcing the bike into gear. Then with power shifting, not dragging the clutch, all you need is a little stab of the clutch. 

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There are other ways to ride a 2-stroke? News to me, I'm always flicking the clutch and power shifting my 300.

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I usually just put a little pressure on the shifter and stab the clutch and it goes right in gear. If you do it right it should be effortless and you shouldn't have to force anything. Works on my yz anyway.

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Ive been powershifting my street legal xr400 for the past year just holding it wide open and shifting normally, hitting the limiter almost every gear. Apart from having to adjust the valves slightly more often I have had absolutely no problems. I have also been doing the same thing with my rmx250 for the last two years problem free.

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If done right, you don't even need the clutch. The tranny in motorcycles can take more rougher shifting. But that does't mean destroy them. Most people let go of the throttle and clank it into the next gear. I shift while I'm letting go of the throttle. Then immediately go back to throttle.

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