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broken Oil bypass bolt

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I hooked up my Trail Tech temp probe to the oil bypass line and that thing leaked oil non-stop. So I tightened. And it turned. So I tightens some more, and it move some more. Yet the oil still dribbled out. So I tightened a couple more time and it snapped. Will that bolt backniut pretty easy with an easy out? I'm bummed I'm such an idiot. I was all dressed up and ready to hit the trails, then this happened. 

Any input on where to buy this bolt for overnight delivery? I have a Trail date on Tuesday. Thanks everyone. 

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I'm not sure what the oil bypass line is but if you broke the banjo bolt for the top end oil pipe it should be easy to back out.

Amazon is probably your best bet for overnight if you don't have a decent shop around and have to order in.  

It is a typical brake system banjo bolt that should  be in stock in any good shop.  Some auto parts stores carry them as well.  You'll need new crush washers with it if it is the banjo bolt you broke.

Edited by Hollerhead

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I was gonna say, copper crush washers crush washers. Buy a bag so everytime you do something, you have a new one everytime.

And that whole, keep tightening til it works, move is no bueno. Every bolt has a spec

Luckily its already oily. Try to get an extractor, but a drill and tap is the quick way, getting metal into the notor would suck. Is it in the head? I hope. Or the block?

And those bolts are different than brake line bolts by the way.

 

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9 hours ago, notoriousE-R-I-C said:

And those bolts are different than brake line bolts by the way.

 

Uh, oh...I'm running a brake line banjo in my top end.  

 

What's different?  Is it the orifice size to regulate flow?  I hope not but I was afraid that may be the case.

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the banjo bolts are sized differently......they are actually 2different sizes on these engines,,,,,,,as long as the side hole is placed right on the bolt and it is the correct size hole...it makes no difference,but is the hole the same size or at least slightly larger???

 

B

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Hmm. Just the one into the head? I dont remember. But the holes are different sizes, top and bottom. Next time Im around the motor thats out, Ill check. But someone will probably say something.
Either way its not even a bump in the road

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I purchased the needed bolt, washer and ez out. The bol's package just said "banjo bolt". No size was referenced on the package with regards to diameter or length. Am I to assume these bolts are just a standard size? I eyed it and it looks the same. Next step is to back the broken bolt out and put the new one in. Easy enough as long as the sizes are accurate. And at least the broken bolt is guaranteed to be lined and oiled. 

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You should be able to tap the tip of a regular screwdriver into the hole in the center of your broken bolt and twist it right out. There won't be any tension on it.

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Curiosity got the best of me.  I just ordered two new bolts that I'll measure up when I get them in a couple days.  

It's interesting, one OEM Honda parts site changed the bottom bolt part number to the top bolt part number when I added it to my cart with a red-line as if it was superseded by the other number.  I didn't order from there.

Anyway, I'll know in a few days for sure what is what.  

Edited by Hollerhead

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One does have a smaller hole , but the flow will be determined by the smaller hole , no matter which bolt is where. SOP on the race bikes was to drill them out the same with a #30 drill bit. I used a couple of brake line banjos and enlarged the oil line too. Bolt and oil line info from Cycle Wizard.

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Ya I ran the little brake hose that went from a left to right front caliper on a street bike. I forgot what bike, I did this before my injury. It didnt have a Y line. It had main line from mc, to the right caliper with a double line bolt, then this little hose I speak of going from right over front tire to left. Yall know? Then I drilled the holes. Dont know if that helped any. Dont think it surpasses my lockhart coolers!
But Joe youre right about where what hole is, from what I gathered. Thats why I just drilled both of them (not sure of the size) bigger. I remember when working at Honda this coming up, but I wasnt a parts guy so I couldnt tell you specifically. I just say it needs this, then they do their work.
Call 714-842-5533 and ask them. In parts. Beasts over here.

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I cut the collars off the ends of a brake line to remove the banjo itself. I always use transmission fluid hose for oil lines , it's tougher than oil hose ,  for higher pressure.  

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I meant I just use that type of hose because it's tougher. I used barbed banjos from a brake line and drilled them out also.

Edited by JoeRC51

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Stock top bolt = 0.090" orifice

Stock bottom bolt = 0.121" orifice

My brake bolt orifice (used in place of my top bolt) = 0.125" which may = oops.

Increasing that top bolt orifice from stock to my .125" nearly doubles flow.  10.13 gph to 19.55 gph.  This is assuming the oil pipe id is large enough to handle that increased flow.  

I wish I'd bought a new oil pipe just so I could cut my old rusty one open just to know what it is but I assume it has a larger id than any of these orifices.  

Anyway, I wonder if it matters much.  I know that filtered part of the oil circuit feeds the bottom end as well, which needs more oil and is probably the purpose of a calculated restriction, but I wonder if the pump has plenty of extra volume to handle it even if the top orifice is opened up larger than stock. There's probably no way to know for sure but I guess if the folks that have sent more oil to the top end have never had any premature bottom end wear then that's probably good enough of a test.

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