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Practice. Ride around for a session making sure you keep 'em up. Don't worry about anything else. After that it'll be more normal, tho you still have to think about it a bit.

This applies to most things....most peeps just go out for practice and try to go fast. Use it to 'practice' the things you need to work on, 1 or 2 things at a time. Don't waste your practice days just reeling off endless laps....

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I was concentrating on this and a few other form items yesterday.  "Overgrip" helps hugely with this and I really noticed the difference when I slipped back to old ways temporarily.  The thing is to make sure that your hands are rotated more forward on the grip.  This makes it easy to keep your elbows up and you really notice the extra control (especially side to side) and comfort.

I don't know why but the overgrip position made my clutch easier to modulate.  I thought that would be more difficult with that grip position but it was the opposite.

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Elbows are easy to keep up IF the rest of your body is in the correct position. If you are having issues, not being able to keep them up is a byproduct of your issue, not the issue it's self. Things like leaning too far back, standing up strait and not hinging at your hips and knees, too tall of bars, ect. Will all make it harder to get your elbows up. It's also more difficult for tall people

Edited by temporarily_locked
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On 4/3/2017 at 3:37 PM, suzuki2t666 said:

 

Hi. Anyone got any tips/tricks to help keep elbows up? Or do I have to rely on willpower?

 

Put your hands further up on the bars  so your wrist aim up. 

If you grip your bars with your wrist flat your elbows will naturally want to drop, but if you raise your wrist, your elbows will naturally go up. When you raise your wrist up, your throttle hand will naturally hold the throttle in an open position and it helps with leaving the throttle cracked through turns and helps you get into the attack position more naturally with your head forward

Understand?

Edited by GBowman
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Ok I'm sure I'll get some grief for asking, but hey I'm learning so nothing ventured - nothing gained. 

Why keep elbows up?

Any pics / videos that show what you are talking about?

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It keeps your arms in a good position to resist any forces you will receive from the bars. The one it makes the biggest difference with is probably forces directly into the fork under forward acceleration. Elbows down and i picture a kangaroo trying to ride a bike, there aren't any pictures. your not using your shoulders and core.

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13 hours ago, LRB said:

Ok I'm sure I'll get some grief for asking, but hey I'm learning so nothing ventured - nothing gained. 

Why keep elbows up?

Any pics / videos that show what you are talking about?

When you keep you're outside elbow up and turns, it waits the front wheel for traction. Theoretically when you're outside elbows up you're also supposed to be pushing down on the bars giving your front and more traction. Accelerating with your elbows up  pulls your body up over the bars so that way the motorcycle is pulling you. And again when you're standing with your elbows up it lets your elbows be the pivot so your head can stay stationary while your bike does the work underneath you.

Watch a Supercross Rider go through the whoops he will be standing in the attack position with his elbows up the bike will be going up and down underneath him but his head will be staying in one spot.

Try this some time to help you understand, drop your elbows and then grab your from break, then get your arms parallel with your bars by raising your elbows then grab the front brake.

 

You'll notice how much more control you have with your elbows raised

 

Edited by GBowman
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14 hours ago, LRB said:

Ok I'm sure I'll get some grief for asking, but hey I'm learning so nothing ventured - nothing gained. 

Why keep elbows up?

Any pics / videos that show what you are talking about?

It has it's advantages and with advantages come some drawbacks.  Lots of notable cross country riders ride with their elbows down and arms in.  Shane Watts did when he had to,  Summers seemed to do it all the time.   I like doing it because it makes me more likely to have my weight forward,  but you can adapt that too.   As was said earlier,  having the outside elbow up in a corner brings your head and body forward (weighting the front end) and also puts weight to the outside peg.   Wrists high is a good thing where  you know the terrain well enough to have your throttle,  shift,  brake pattern down and the timing for the same.  Cross country,  or trail riding maybe not so much.  Having your wrist in a more neutral position so you can SHUT off easily when you are on unknown or little known ground can be safer.   

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16 hours ago, LRB said:

Ok I'm sure I'll get some grief for asking, but hey I'm learning so nothing ventured - nothing gained. 

Why keep elbows up?

Any pics / videos that show what you are talking about?

My suggestion is to find a rutted corner and take it purposely with your elbows down. Immediately circle around and take it with your elbows up.

I did this. It reinforces in your mind that elbows up is more in control and hence faster. 

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2 hours ago, ossagp said:

It has it's advantages and with advantages come some drawbacks.  Lots of notable cross country riders ride with their elbows down and arms in.  Shane Watts did when he had to,  Summers seemed to do it all the time.   I like doing it because it makes me more likely to have my weight forward,  but you can adapt that too.   As was said earlier,  having the outside elbow up in a corner brings your head and body forward (weighting the front end) and also puts weight to the outside peg.   Wrists high is a good thing where  you know the terrain well enough to have your throttle,  shift,  brake pattern down and the timing for the same.  Cross country,  or trail riding maybe not so much.  Having your wrist in a more neutral position so you can SHUT off easily when you are on unknown or little known ground can be safer.   

This is where I feel grip technique is important. I feel that if you hold the grip with the "door knob", "tennis racket" technique you can over-grip (only takes a little) and not increase the risk of whiskey Throttle, and in general you have better throttle control. IMO, over grip without this technique and with your elbows down, you might as well stamp Whiskey Throttle Dude on your forehead. :goofy:

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A lot of years of riding,  and a lot of ways to fall off.  I don't ride the same way on pavement,  flattrack or cross country or even on playing on an mx track.  I have always been the kind to ride up on the front more,  and I have had my head near the bars for ohhhh,  50 years.   Forward gets the elbows up more than most without thinking about it.  I think I overshot more backwoods turns that my friends didn't because of it.  Seems like they always saw that too.  After thinking about why they could see my crashes more than I did theirs,  I started thinking I liked my habits better than theirs.  Besides,   I learned to keep it leaned over and not "giveup" on the corner earlier than most.  

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