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I have put 8k miles on a 16 sm

I have a separate excel wheels with knobies for offroading and want to keep a good sm street tire that preforms well at 70-100mph.

Around 6k miles I replaced both front and rear with Pirelli Diablo Rosso III.

After my last ride I noticed the back is already worn very fast.. only 2k miles on them.

Anyone know if this tire is not good for street riding or if there are better street tires that hold up?

Edited by NKER
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I really like the Avon AV80 and Michelin Pilot Power 3. They're both dual compound so the center won't square off as quickly but the sides are still sticky. The Michelin doesn't come in a 150, I believe, but the Avon does. I really like the Avon rear. It's got sipes with teeth on the sides that generate friction and heat the sides quickly. 

Right now I'm running a PP3 front and AV80 rear.

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I ran a set of Michelin Pilot Road 2 for over 12K miles before I needed to replace the rear.  The Pilot Road 2 is no longer available, having been replaced by the Road 3 and, now, the Road 4.  Both the latter versions have a different tread pattern than the Road 2, and since I hate mixing tread patterns and still have the Pilot Road 2 up front, I went with Michelin's City Sport rear tire.  I think they no longer offer that tire (it was designed for lighter bike, i.e. sunthin' like the DRZ), but it has the same tread pattern as the old Road 2 tires.  The best part:  It came in 140/70/17 which is the spec on the original Dunlops on the bike.  I see with a quick search you can now get the Road 2 CT which has returned to the same tread pattern as the original Road 2 with the dual compound.  Problem is, like the original Road 2's, the smallest rear is a 150/60/17.  That'll fit without issue on the SM, but isn't the factory spec.

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probably the most affordable and best proforming tire that i have used for commuting is the bridgestone s20's. they don't make those anymore and have been replaced by these. but are awesome tires.  3 compound tire. they wear evenly and last longer 
 
https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/bridgestone-battlax-hypersport-s21-rear-tires


The smallest these show up in is 160mm width. Is that what you ran on the drz400sm? Did you have chain rub or dish the wheel some to clear the 160?
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4 hours ago, sbmon said:

 


The smallest these show up in is 160mm width. Is that what you ran on the drz400sm? Did you have chain rub or dish the wheel some to clear the 160?

 

 

 

had absolutely no issues what so ever.

 

heres a photo i took when i first got them and was giving them a break in run. you can see that there was a bit of chain slap but it never tore or ripped

 

86457E40-2124-4F7F-8A80-1074F4B99184_zps

 

good looking tire too

5F2B51AB-76E1-4211-9D75-8C7FAC95C7EC_zps

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I'm neither a scientist, engineer, nor mechanic, but I have talked with the local distributor of motorcycle tires to the area dealers.  He observed (based on his discussions with manufacturers) that bigger is not better when it comes to sizing tires for your motorcycle.  Counterintuitively, a larger tire will sometimes wear out faster than a smaller one of the same brand and model based on the profile the tire presents in contact with the road.  In short, if your rear is wider (and on the DRZ, that's what we're talkin' 'bout), when you lean into a corner, you won't roll as far to the shoulder of the tire, and you'll actually wear the face of the tire out because you're, effectively, using less of the surface of the tire on a regular basis.  I can't speak to how this subtly affects performance.

Over time and thousands of miles, this contributes to shorter tire life.  Admittedly, in the scheme of things, performance and wear between a 140/70 profile tire and a 150/60 is probably negligible, but it's worth noting that manufacturers do spec the tires they feel best suit the average user for a particular machine, and Suzuki's Owner's Manual for the DR-Z400SM specifically says 140/70/17 and Suzuki specifically speced as OEM the Dunlop D208 SM tire in 140/70/17.  I'll also say they gave me the best performance I've ever had on the bike because they were soft and sticky, but they wore out at about 2000 miles.

I went with the dual compound Michelins for the same reason most folks do:  Longer tire life.  I can't see much difference in handling because I ride slower than your grandmother's garden cart, but I did notice the difference in braking right away--the Dunlops hauled me down much more quickly than the Michelins.

I'm not lookin' to start an argument here--I ran the Pilot Road 2 rear in 150/70/17 because that was the smallest rear size it came in--but I like the swingarm/chain clearance of the 140, and it performs quite well.

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Once again repping the Avon AV80. Feel like not enough people know about 'em.

- Sticky on the sides, hard in middle ;)

- Comes in 150

- Sides heat up quick

- Decent in rain

- Not that expensive, EBAY NOT REVZILLA

 

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probably the most affordable and best proforming tire that i have used for commuting is the bridgestone s20's. they don't make those anymore and have been replaced by these. but are awesome tires.  3 compound tire. they wear evenly and last longer 
 
https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/bridgestone-battlax-hypersport-s21-rear-tires


You can still get the s20's. I just bought one for my front tire.
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20 hours ago, giotto said:

I'm neither a scientist, engineer, nor mechanic, but I have talked with the local distributor of motorcycle tires to the area dealers.  He observed (based on his discussions with manufacturers) that bigger is not better when it comes to sizing tires for your motorcycle.  Counterintuitively, a larger tire will sometimes wear out faster than a smaller one of the same brand and model based on the profile the tire presents in contact with the road.  In short, if your rear is wider (and on the DRZ, that's what we're talkin' 'bout), when you lean into a corner, you won't roll as far to the shoulder of the tire, and you'll actually wear the face of the tire out because you're, effectively, using less of the surface of the tire on a regular basis.  I can't speak to how this subtly affects performance.

Over time and thousands of miles, this contributes to shorter tire life.  Admittedly, in the scheme of things, performance and wear between a 140/70 profile tire and a 150/60 is probably negligible, but it's worth noting that manufacturers do spec the tires they feel best suit the average user for a particular machine, and Suzuki 's Owner's Manual for the DR-Z400SM specifically says 140/70/17 and Suzuki specifically speced as OEM the Dunlop D208 SM tire in 140/70/17.  I'll also say they gave me the best performance I've ever had on the bike because they were soft and sticky, but they wore out at about 2000 miles.

I went with the dual compound Michelins for the same reason most folks do:  Longer tire life.  I can't see much difference in handling because I ride slower than your grandmother's garden cart, but I did notice the difference in braking right away--the Dunlops hauled me down much more quickly than the Michelins.

I'm not lookin' to start an argument here--I ran the Pilot Road 2 rear in 150/70/17 because that was the smallest rear size it came in--but I like the swingarm/chain clearance of the 140, and it performs quite well.

So you are saying that you loved the OEM 208's??

 

 

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Also worth mentioning many people tend to look at the 160mm tires because the selection is much better vs 140-150. I ran a pirelli 150 with zero chain rub or other issues previously but it was close. All tires measure up a little different and things start getting really close around 150mm on the stock SM wheel.

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also i think worth mentioning is something ive observed - a fat tire looks cool and ive always liked the look myself, but the truth is, all rims being the same width anyway, that if you put a fat tire on your bike it changes the profile to more round .. that means LESS contact patch and it wears out fast right in the middle ..

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3 hours ago, cowpie said:

also i think worth mentioning is something ive observed - a fat tire looks cool and ive always liked the look myself, but the truth is, all rims being the same width anyway, that if you put a fat tire on your bike it changes the profile to more round .. that means LESS contact patch and it wears out fast right in the middle ..

07 and up changed Rim width. People that are running 05-06 OEM SM rims have 4.25in...so your statement is more true for them. But  suzuki went wider in 07 to 4.5in. Slight difference but I can tell you with my old 4.5in rim spooning on a 160 did absolutely nothing adverse to the profile of a few specific brands. Shinko and Michelin run larger. A Bridgestone 160 measured 155mm

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8 hours ago, 707drz said:

07 and up changed Rim width. People that are running 05-06 OEM SM rims have 4.25in...so your statement is more true for them. But  suzuki  went wider in 07 to 4.5in. Slight difference but I can tell you with my old 4.5in rim spooning on a 160 did absolutely nothing adverse to the profile of a few specific brands. Shinko and Michelin run larger. A Bridgestone 160 measured 155mm

i didnt know that, and i feel miffed as well as cheated with my 4 1/4 rims now dammit .. but for sure, going larger than stock wont do anything for tire longevity on the 4.25 rims, my next tire will be a 140 ..

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17 hours ago, 707drz said:

So you are saying that you loved the OEM 208's??

 

 

Actually, yes, I did like the Dunlop 208's and they performed quite well for me.  I never took them to a track, so I can't speak to high-performance handling, but on the street they ran great; they just erased themselves way too quickly.  I got, tops, just under 3000 miles on a rear and it was flat and bald.  Hence, the Pilot Road 2 rear which ran nearly 12,000 miles!  I only have about 2000 on the current Pilot Street rear I'm running, but it shows very little wear, and already has gone as far as any of the Dunlops I ran.

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my original factory rear rim on both of my '05 SM's is factory spec'd at 4.5".I don't know where the 4.25" reference came from but it is a very common size for aftermarket sm rear rims.

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A 160/60 rear tire is very close(5/32") to the stock 140/70 tire height.The 150/60 is over 5/8"(.630") shorter than stock height which would take a 1 tooth smaller rear sprocket to match the stock drive ratio and powerband.

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