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Suspension setting or poor riding technique?

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I ride a 2007 yz250f (I'm a decent rider), and I just replaced my fork seals. I tried to set the compression and rebound adjustments back to where they were before, but I'm having some challenges when I try to ride over whoops that I don't remember having before. I've been practicing getting my front wheel up a little bit when I ride over the whoops, which I'm usually successful for a few of them, then I hit the next few slower until I get the front wheel up again. Anyway, on my last ride, when the front wheel came down my back end kept bucking up and throwing me forward. Does my whoops riding technique just suck or can I blame it on improperly adjusted suspension?

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On 4/4/2017 at 3:03 PM, JG12YZ said:

I ride a 2007 yz250f (I'm a decent rider), and I just replaced my fork seals. I tried to set the compression and rebound adjustments back to where they were before, but I'm having some challenges when I try to ride over whoops that I don't remember having before. I've been practicing getting my front wheel up a little bit when I ride over the whoops, which I'm usually successful for a few of them, then I hit the next few slower until I get the front wheel up again. Anyway, on my last ride, when the front wheel came down my back end kept bucking up and throwing me forward. Does my whoops riding technique just suck or can I blame it on improperly adjusted suspension?

If the fork oil viscosity and/or level has changed, the fork performance will be very different. Fork oils of the same alleged viscosity from different manufacturers have very different performance. It's a little technical, but see this for an idea of what I'm talking about: http://www.peterverdone.com/wiki/index.php?title=Suspension_Fluid

I wonder, is your back end kicking up because the front end is bottoming or diving heavily? Check out some tips on suspension tuning:

Bryan Bosch links to Alan Stillwell's writeup on TT, and it is a great place to start.

Stillwell's videos here: http://moto.stillwellperformance.com/videos/

Edited by Old Plonker

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Just a thought: are your forks properly aligned?  After removing the front wheel and then putting it back on, make sure to tighten only the left side axle pinch bolts and then compress the forks several times before torquing the right side pinch bolts.  If the right and left sides are tightened at the same time then the bottoms of the forks can be spread too wide or too close together.  Even though the distance might be very small, it can make the forks bind a bit during their travel.  The extra resistance could be enough to give you trouble in the whoops.

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At first thought this thread said "suspension setting FOR poor riding technique" ... what lol 


Thats what I need!

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One thing I have learned is to check the shock pressure every other ride. Especially important if track riding. I have used straight air and a digital shock pump for the last 2 years for my shock and it has been consistent in performance.

I was surprised, even with nitrogen, how much pressure the shock loses over time. Low shock pressure makes for a very springy rebound. Just something to check over.

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