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My 2013 RMZ250 Project Bike

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Hello All,

Well, I came home with a 2013 RMZ250 today and I am super excited.  This will be a project bike for me as the motor is currently locked up.  I got this bike for such a good deal, I could not pass it up.  

I dont know much about it yet, but tomorrow, I will drain the oil and start opening up the sides of the engine to see what I can find.  Since this is my first Suzuki, do you have any suggestions on where to start?  Also, anyone have a 2013 Service manual?  That would really help me out.  

Just wanted to start this thread as I am sure I will have numerous questions and you guys are the pros.   Wish me luck and check back for updates.

Cheers!

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First part of this project is to arm myself with the information to do the job.  That will require me to obtain the service manual.  I have searched online, and can not find and/or verify the correct year manual for my 2013.  So, here are few questions, your help would be greatly appreciated:

  1. What span of years is the 2013 covered under?  For example, a service manual might be listed for 2008...but for a Honda CRF, it is the same service manual for 2004-2009. 
  2. On Suzuki's website, they have several manuals listed for purchase (which I have no issue in doing), but it is sort of confusing:
  • Owner's Manual - The manual that comes with a newly purchased vehicle. Provides instructions for proper operation and performing basic inspection and maintenance. View Sample
  • Service Manuals - The manual used by Suzuki factory technicians. Contains detailed procedures for all service, from performing basic periodic maintenance to a complete engine disassembly and assembly. Covers all systems and components. View Sample
  • Owner's Service Manuals - This manual combines under a single cover the Owner's and Service Manuals previously described. This special manual is the only type existing for off-road competition motorcycles. View Sample

Based on how I read it...the Owner's Service Manual should give me best of both worlds.  However, it is only 247 pages and the regular service manual is 726 pages.

Here is the link where I pulled this information.

The information I need is detailed on engine removal, reassembly, replacement procedures, etc.  I might be looking at a new bottom and top end. :)

Thanks!

PS:  If anyone has something electronically, that let's say would help me with my job...please let me know via PM! ;)

 

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-06 at 8.40.58 AM.png

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Over the weekend, I was able to tear into the bike and found that while the piston/cylinder head and valves might be good, the big crankrod bearing is shot.  Part number 4 in this schematic.  

So, since I will have to split the case, I might as well rebuild the entire engine as Slowdogs recommended.  I have never split an engine case before, so this should be fun.  Any tips?  Regarding engine rebuild, should I go OEM or a bundled kit from RMATV?

Thanks!

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On 4/10/2017 at 9:44 AM, TPA-MX said:

Over the weekend, I was able to tear into the bike and found that while the piston/cylinder head and valves might be good, the big crankrod bearing is shot.  Part number 4 in this schematic.  

So, since I will have to split the case, I might as well rebuild the entire engine as Slowdogs recommended.  I have never split an engine case before, so this should be fun.  Any tips?  Regarding engine rebuild, should I go OEM or a bundled kit from RMATV?

Thanks!

I ordered one of the 700 something page service manuals from Suzuki. I believe it was just under $100 also. It has all of the info you could ever need and detailed specs and schematics. As far as a rebuild kit if you don't want to spend the money to go oem go with hot rods. Oem would be your best option but a hot rods crank will do just fine also. I wouldn't go with anything cheaper than that however. As far as gaskets I'd go with oem or cometic. I've had no issues with either in my 2013 rmz in the past. Oem or wiseco for pistons as well. Best of luck 

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3 minutes ago, Ajf55 said:

I ordered one of the 700 something page service manuals from Suzuki. I believe it was just under $100 also. It has all of the info you could ever need and detailed specs and schematics. As far as a rebuild kit if you don't want to spend the money to go oem go with hot rods. Oem would be your best option but a hot rods crank will do just fine also. I wouldn't go with anything cheaper than that however. As far as gaskets I'd go with oem or cometic. I've had no issues with either in my 2013 rmz in the past. Oem or wiseco for pistons as well. Best of luck 

Thanks AJF55.  There is a complete bottom end and top end kit with all seals and gaskets I am eyeing.  It is a hotrods crank and wiesco piston.  Over the next few days, I will be removing the engine while I wait for the correct flywheel puller to arrive (my YZ one did not fit) :)  Also, I have the crank puller and case splitter arriving later this week.  

Any easy way to re-install the main crank bearings?  I was thinking about sweating them in, but I dont have propane torch nor have I used one.  Or would putting the bearings in the freezer for a while work along with a large socket to drive them in?

Cheers.

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15 minutes ago, TPA-MX said:

Thanks AJF55.  There is a complete bottom end and top end kit with all seals and gaskets I am eyeing.  It is a hotrods crank and wiesco piston.  Over the next few days, I will be removing the engine while I wait for the correct flywheel puller to arrive (my YZ one did not fit) :)  Also, I have the crank puller and case splitter arriving later this week.  

Any easy way to re-install the main crank bearings?  I was thinking about sweating them in, but I dont have propane torch nor have I used one.  Or would putting the bearings in the freezer for a while work along with a large socket to drive them in?

Cheers.

That kit should be just fine. I have had success sweating them in and tapping them with a socket or a bearing driver. It can be pretty tricky. It may be better just to take it to a bike mechanic or a machine shop to have them pressed in. When you go to remove the primary drive gear on the crankshaft note that it is reverse thread. Don't make the same mistake i did. I used an impact and tried to loosen it which stripped the nut and I ended up having to cut the nut off the crank

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34 minutes ago, Ajf55 said:

That kit should be just fine. I have had success sweating them in and tapping them with a socket or a bearing driver. It can be pretty tricky. It may be better just to take it to a bike mechanic or a machine shop to have them pressed in. When you go to remove the primary drive gear on the crankshaft note that it is reverse thread. Don't make the same mistake i did. I used an impact and tried to loosen it which stripped the nut and I ended up having to cut the nut off the crank

Great point on the reverse thread comment on the primary drive nut.  I was trying to "loosing" it for a while with no luck.  I then read the manual (slap my head) and saw that is was a reverse thread.  Threw the impact wrench into forward and BAM, nut came right off. :)

When you sweated them in...did you use a torch to heat up the case?  I dont mind buying one....just want to make sure I know what I am getting into.  

I have a buddy who works at a metal shop, so they might have a press to help.  

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Over the weekend, I was able to tear into the bike and found that while the piston/cylinder head and valves might be good, the big crankrod bearing is shot.  Part number 4 in this schematic.  

So, since I will have to split the case, I might as well rebuild the entire engine as Slowdogs recommended.  I have never split an engine case before, so this should be fun.  Any tips?  Regarding engine rebuild, should I go OEM or a bundled kit from RMATV?

Thanks!

Through in a cylinder works 270 kit...Or you can install a cylinder works oem kit. Reasonable pricing. For the bottom end , go oem.

 

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If you have access to a shop that could press the bearings in I would definitely go that route. I've done both, sweat them and had them pressed—getting them pressed is much less stressful/frustrating and there's more piece of mind that comes from it....as far as I'm concerned anyway. Good luck on the case splitting! It's a life changing moment.....that's when you realize, "This isn't such a big deal?! I can do ANYTHING now!"lol

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That awesome bolt! Love the last word of encouragement. I bet you it's going to be sort of like measuring valves for the first time

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Bingo! As long as you have a nice clean and open work area to arrange and group your parts together in as you disassemble everything, a good manual and trusty torque wrench, you'll be in good shape. A nice work area goes a long way in keeping the stress and frustrations low as well. Another big thing is to not cut corners. If you're tearing the thing down completely you might as well replace everything you are able to while in there. Peace of mind comes from knowing that you don't have to question the wear on any internal components such as your bearings and seals.....gaskets too—don't reuse those things, they're cheap enough just stick new ones in and try not to get caught up in the rush of just "getting everything back together".

If you gotta be inside, get the job done right so you don't have to go back any time soon! 

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Thanks bolt! Got the case split this weekend and all the components disassembled, bagged and labeled. I "was", maybe still am a little bit, freaking out about the transmission reassembly, but after watching a few videos last night, it looks like it is not the complicated.

I agree with you, I have all new seals, gaskets, etc. I am replacing the main crank shaft bearings, but leaving the others, they feel really smooth.

I cleaned the cylinder looking oil filter (magnetic) really good as well, removed magnet, clips, etc. It looks brand new now.

I am also going to clean the cases really well to remove any left over dust, dirt, shavings, etc.

Starting today, I am going to start removing the original crank shaft bearings, but first I need to remove the Phillips head screws that secure the bearing holder plate. Those guys are VERY right, need to replace my impact driver to get them out. (Broke the tip on it this weekend, getting another screw out. I almost stripped, but I was able to get it out.

20170417_085540.jpg

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Looking good! You may want to look in the assembly section for those bearing retainers and see if the screws call for loctite upon assembly. If so, that could be why they're so hard to get out. If that's the case, you can heat the screw heads up with a torch which will in turn heat the entire screw up, heating up the old loctite and allowing you to remove them easier. Just don't be too hurried, you definitely don't want to strip those heads....which, I know you know that.lol  I hope it all goes smooth for you! 

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Thanks Bolt!  I have a fairly good heat gun that goes up to 1000 degrees...I will try to use that first....

On a side note....what do you use to remove the spark plug from the engine head?  The one I have seems to be a little short?

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A 5/8 spark plug socket or deep well socket. Although, the deep well might not be deep enough if that is what you've already tried using. The spark plug socket is a little longer and has a little rubber opening at the top that pops over the end of the spark plug and holds it once it's been unscrewed completely. That allows you to removed the plug without having to use a pair of needle nose pliers.

Edited by BOLT SPEEDMAN
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Today I'm going to install the new crank and crank bearings into the case. It looks like most people install the crank on the right side case first, any suggestions?

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