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Rear tire position

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Got my new set of rims a few days back and managed to successfully get the front tire on (first tire I ever did myself, felt pretty good) but after a couple hours and a couple of temper tantrums I ended up taking the rear wheel in to the local shop. I just couldn't get the bloody thing on and was happy to pay to have it done.

Now I am getting it on the bike and need a bit of advice.

14T up front and a 48T on the back. I got the CRF150 chain guide (thx for the advice gnath) to accommodate the extra teeth. I assume I want the marker to be in the green zone in the first pic below. I can't move the tire any more forward though as the rear sproket teeth are already just a papers width away from the chain guide. Is it ok to have it in the red? If not any ideas?20170406_224215.jpg.65791491e5a0e1a562da666332348eaf.jpg

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14 minutes ago, Kompact said:

Is it ok to have it in the red? If not any ideas?

Don't worry about the sticker and colours...that is only for standard chain length with standard sprockets.

I'm also using a 48T on the back and had to grind a fraction off the chain guide front face (I also have the CRF 150 one) to get it to fit

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It's just a sticker, can be peeled and moved, or a new one placed.  Ideally you want to place it with the indicator on the line between the green and silver with a fresh chain and sprockets, with correct adjustment, where exactly it's placed will vary with sprockets.  It only serves as a handy guide to indicate when the chain is stretched or the sprockets are worn.  Of course you should already know without relying on a sticker by regular visual inspections, and checking chain roller play/stretch during chain maintenence.

Edited by alucard0822
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5 hours ago, Neilly said:

Don't worry about the sticker and colours...that is only for standard chain length with standard sprockets.

I'm also using a 48T on the back and had to grind a fraction off the chain guide front face (I also have the CRF 150 one) to get it to fit

Yup, you need to grind a slot in the crf 150 chain guide. How many links are you using on the new chain? Mine with a 13/48 was real close to the green/silver line. I posted in the gearing topic. Page 57 of the topic I think. I was using 110 links with 13/48. Now I'm using 108 links with 13/45

 

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6 hours ago, Kompact said:

I got the CRF150 chain guide (thx for the advice gnath)

I had to cut the slot a little and I have a 44 back there .... you will need to cut a little more. It really does not hurt anything having the wheel back that far but, you will run out of room for adjustment as your chain stretches. If you have not cut your chain yet I suggest you cut the slot to allow for full freedom of movement. My wheel is up too dang far ... :facepalm: 

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Thanks for the answers guys. I'll take the dremel to the chain guide after work today and make a bit more room.

I got a 120 link chain and have not cut it yet. Once I get the chain guide ground out a bit and the wheel as far forward as I can I'll post a couple pics and ask you to help me decide where to cut the chain. I've always paid the local garage to do everything for me except oil changes and air filter replacements. I'm pretty new to all things mechanical and really appreciate the help and advice.

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Took the dremel to the chain guide and there is lots of room now. What is the nut and bolt in the red square and how do I adjust it?

 

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Wow. Thats, your adjuster. Loosen the lock nuts and turn the bolt head counter clockwise to walk the axel back with just a bit of tension on the axel nut. Turn small amounts on each side equally until desired chain tension is achieved. I like to count the threads on each side with my thumbnail to be sure they are equal. Then tighten the lock nuts and bang your wheel forward with your hand before tightening your axel nut.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, HeavyRotation said:

Wow. Thats, your adjuster.

 

 

I know my questions seem super obvious I've just always paid the mechanic to do the work for me and have never learned. My kids are now grown and out of the house so with all my newly found free time I am having fun learning how to work on my bike and do the maintenance myself. I'm a couple decades late to the party but better late then never!

Thanks for the detailed explanation HeavyRotation, much appreciated :thumbsup:

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I know my questions seem super obvious I've just always paid the mechanic to do the work for me and have never learned. My kids are now grown and out of the house so with all my newly found free time I am having fun learning how to work on my bike and do the maintenance myself. I'm a couple decades late to the party but better late then never!
Thanks for the detailed explanation HeavyRotation, much appreciated

It's cool dude. Good for you. I'm pretty buzzed so the sarcasm comes out a bit.
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A couple minor things.  It's best to use a gauge to make sure your rear axle is aligned, or at least to verify the hash marks.  The CRF250L's chain spec is 1"-1.4", it's just as important to make sure it's not too tight as it is to make sure it isn't too loose.  It's measured on the sidestand.  You can use adjusters to push a loose axle and help adjust it instead of moving it and just running them out and snugging them up as the video shows, make sure everything is nice and loose, or the bolts can strip in the swingarm, which is really bad. 

Edited by alucard0822
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