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28 hours on a 2015 250XCW: advice

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Hey guys, there's a 250 XCW (2015) for sale in my area. It has 28 hours on the odometer, but I'm wondering if there's a way to check the validity of that. As far as I know, it's easily possible to remove the wire that measures KM/hours and then just plug it back in, correct? Is it possible to reset the hour meter as well? What can I do to check the condition of the bike besides the obvious? I know how to look over a 4-stroke and general things (clean air filter, wheel bearings etc). The only two stroke I've ever owned was a KDX 200 and I have no way of doing a compression test, so a few questions regarding this model and checking the condition of a smoker:

1-Can I take off the pipe off of it and check inside to look for any scoring on the piston skirts? Will I need to use the kick lever to move the piston into a visible position, or can I just take off the pipe and take a peek? What exactly will I be seeing, the top/bottom part of the piston? So if the piston doesn't have any scoring below the rings, it should be good to go? I can deal with small things, but my main concern is a shot piston and bad scoring along the cylinder wall. I don't want to have to replate a cylinder right after purchase...

2- Is it possible to remove the left-hand case cover on a KTM to check for play in the crank as with older CR250s? Do I just remove it and then try to move the knob up and down? Anything else to it? 

3-The bike looks like a good deal at first glance (I've seen it, but don't have pictures handy at the moment). Stored a bit badly amongst other bikes (a bit of dust, kit all over it). Fairly clean plastics, cases seem pretty clean with little wear (only saw right side). It has a pipe guard, disk protector and seems to still be on the stock tires. What I find weird is that it has a weird silencer on it. Pretty sure it's this Akrapovic one:

http://www.chaparral-racing.com/product/ktm-akrapovic-factory-2-stroke-slip-on-exhaust/55105981000.aspx

I find it bizarre as I thought aftermarket silencers didn't really do much to smokers nowadays, so might be the sign of a 2-stroke novice coming off a thumper? Or am I wrong? In my limited experience the stock silencers just make it difficult to repack than stock ones while pipes actually did change things somewhat, but perhaps things have changed...

I'm going tomorrow to have a closer look but want to be "prepared", but wondering if it's a steal or a bad headache waiting to happen. 

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1 hour ago, Bitteeinbit said:

As far as I know, it's easily possible to remove the wire that measures KM/hours and then just plug it back in, correct? Is it possible to reset the hour meter as well?

I'm pretty curious about this myself...

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Yes you can unplug the wire on the stock instrument and not record hours.

If you came to look at a bike I had for sale and wanted to pull it a part to inspect it I would tell you to f off. Looking at the air filter no problem. Unbolting pipes and side cases no way.

The bike could have 500 hrs on it but have a new piston and crank and look perfect. 

Just look at the wear on the bike. Foot pegs, shifter, plastic, sprockets  , brake rotors.  If anything has excessive wear or has been replaced then I would question the hours.

 

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Fair enough GreenMT. This bike is in a shop though and I know the owner well, but I can't vouch for the PO he bought it from. I honestly don't think he'd mind me having a closer look to as we know each other well enough so I doubt he'd be offended. I've checked online and the slip on silencer is this one (551.05.981.000):

http://www.chaparral-racing.com/product/ktm-akrapovic-factory-2-stroke-slip-on-exhaust/55105981000.aspx

Not exactly a cheap piece of kit and makes me wonder why someone would spend around $9000-10 000 on a bike (what they cost new here) and then only ride it for 28 hours over one or two years... If it sounds too good to be true... Then again, a lot of guys have money to burn and pick new hobbies at random. I'll go tomorrow and pull it out of the shed of sorts he's storing it in and have a good look around at the cases etc from both sides. The only addition I would need is a Lectron (mileage is really important to me), barkbusters (still had stock ones) and maybe a tall seat.

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13 minutes ago, Bitteeinbit said:

Fair enough GreenMT. This bike is in a shop though and I know the owner well, but I can't vouch for the PO he bought it from. I honestly don't think he'd mind me having a closer look to as we know each other well enough so I doubt he'd be offended. I've checked online and the slip on silencer is this one (551.05.981.000):

http://www.chaparral-racing.com/product/ktm-akrapovic-factory-2-stroke-slip-on-exhaust/55105981000.aspx

Not exactly a cheap piece of kit and makes me wonder why someone would spend around $9000-10 000 on a bike (what they cost new here) and then only ride it for 28 hours over one or two years... If it sounds too good to be true... Then again, a lot of guys have money to burn and pick new hobbies at random. I'll go tomorrow and pull it out of the shed of sorts he's storing it in and have a good look around at the cases etc from both sides. The only addition I would need is a Lectron (mileage is really important to me), barkbusters (still had stock ones) and maybe a tall seat.

A lot of people spend a ton of money on these things, only to have them be placed on the backburner due to life getting in the way.  It's even likely that it was sold due to this.  Like has been suggested, take a good look at the external components of the bike.  There will be indicators of amount of use.

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If you came to look at my bike and wanted to tear into it you'd better show me the cash and bring your own tools.
If you had the proper tools to do a leak down or compression test and the knowledge, I'd be cool with it.
I'm a pretty good judge of character and it's pretty easy to tell if someone knows their way around a bike or not.
Honestly though, you can tell a lot about how the bike was ridden and maintained simply by going over it with a fine toothed comb.
Looks at the rotor guard, under the swing arm, under skid plate, airbox, etc.
I recently (11-23-16) picked up a 2013 250xc-w with only 20 hours on it.
Absolutely spotless!!
Kid was scared of it after a couple rides and parked it.
That low of hours you say, I'd say it shouldn't be beat up under neath.
What's the price?

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A woods bike will take a lot of abuse quickly. A track bike looks cleaner for longer.
Check the skid plate, the chain guide, the chain block, anything that hits or drags the ground during riding. If you can pull the seat and look in the airbox, I'd do it. Check tires, find out if they're stock, do your research and find out what tires come stock on that bike from factory. Check the pipe shape, if it's dented in multiple places, etc. And plastics obviously, but that's hard to gauge hours of ride time from plastics. I look at pegs, brake pedals, shifter, boot marks on the frame and wear on the magneto and clutch cover. I bought a 2015 Yz250 with under 10 hours. But looked brand new, stock tires, it had the original grips, plastics looked fresh, everything Looked great! Why? Because a 67 year old man decided to buy it, rode it a half a dozen times, realized he was too old and sold it. So I save $2-3000 and got a basically new bike!

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6 hours ago, GreenMT_Rider said:

Yes you can unplug the wire on the stock instrument and not record hours.

This doesn't erase the hour meter, correct?  Unplugging would just stop it from counting... then when plugged back in it would continue counting hours from the last time it was plugged in?

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48 minutes ago, quikcolin said:

This doesn't erase the hour meter, correct?  Unplugging would just stop it from counting... then when plugged back in it would continue counting hours from the last time it was plugged in?

The hours stay and are not erased. 

When I ran my ICO enduro computer on my 200xcw I would have to disconnect the oem unit. The bike showed less hours ran then there actually was. I kept track the hours and let the new owner know the difference. 

Hour meters also fail . Mine just did at 46 hours on my 250xcf. So now there is a new one on starting from scratch. 

You really need to look at all the bike and look for wear. After having several new bikes I've seen the different stages of wear.  A bike with 28 hours will look a lot different than one with 128

Edited by GreenMT_Rider
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A bike with 28 hours looks just like a bike with 28 hours, How clean are the engine surfaces, if OP was a spode he may have crashed a lot and plastics could be hammered.

My 2015 has 250 hours and looks like it. No issues with the bike however, still runs great.

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Thanks for all the input. I went and had a closer look yesterday and without a doubt the hours look legit. The plastics are still nice but definitely scratched up a bit from branches, falls etc. The pipe isn't dinged though. I felt the brake lever didn't have that tight new bike feel (a bit wobbly) but might just need some adjusting. More importantly, I took it out in the daylight and had a nice walkaround. Both case covers (the black plastic one and aluminum one) are immaculate. The plastic one looks untouched and the aluminum one has a few tiny superficial scratched, but zero boot wear as one normally sees after a while. It actually still has the small Motul sticker (or Liquimoly?) on it from the showroom floor. Rotors have a few marks from rain water which I'm guessing will go with time. The shift and brake levers are like brand new, zero wear at all. The footpegs show a little wear, but nothing unusual. Frame is nice, but there's very small ding/scratch on the underside as there PO didn't fit a skidplate... Still, the pant is all new and he obviously didn't ride rocks since it still looks good. 

And yeah, I was told the previous owner was the son of a rather famous local politician. He likes to buy new toys... He now has a Husqvarna 85cc which he rides around his mansion along with a bunch of cars of course. 

The brand new KTM 200 I had my eye on has been sold so bow this is maybe the next best thing. He wants $6500 for it, which I know is steep for you guys but not entirely unreasonable here for such low hours. For example, around here a new KTM 450 is $12 000+, 11K+ for 350 etc. High customs fees and all. I test rode it and it felt really fun. Definitely put a smile on my face. There was traffic in town but could pop a few wheelies in 2nd and 3rd. Plenty of power. Not sure how tame or aggressive the powervalve screw was set to, but it certainly didn't lack power... Also rode a Beta 350 which was silky smooth. I'll need to think about it, but I like the idea of a simple machine.

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