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250 XC-W Transmission Oil Weight... 10W/30 okay????

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I've ran rotella t4 15w/40 in my 300xc since new.  It seems I get about 7-10 hours before the shifter starts to get a little notchy and harder to find neutral.  I may switch to another oil to see if the shifter feel improves. I agree theres not much going on inside a two stroke gearbox one needs to worry about.  I would still prefer a JASO ma/ma2 oil but it seems like theres guys who are practically running canola oil out there and not having issues so who knows.

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Not a 2T but I've been using Maxima MTL 80WT in my 05 CRF250R since 2010 when I got it. Believe it has the OEM clutch and I've filled out some outer basket grooves a few years ago and stills pulls 1/2 fingers.

Change with every oil/filter change (ya 4T) max 10 hours.

My 2 cents and results may vary :)

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2012 250xcw... 160 hours on the bike. I have run Rotella T4 Diesel, Motorex,  but mostly Valvoline ATF.  occasionally other things here and there.  For me, for sure the smoothest easiest shifting is with the ATF.   I do change at about 5-7 hour intervals.  A weekend ride for me is about 3 hours. So I change every couple of rides . I checked my clutch plates the other day and they specked out like new.  Single track riding.   My 4strokes usually get Rotella T4 SYN. Every time I ride its about a 400 mile round trip.  A $9 oil change and a new $2 plug every ride or so is the least of my expenses. 

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I been using Amsoil Synthetic DIRT transmission fluid SAE 80 with no discoloration and very good overall condition of my clutch. Belray Gear Saver 80w transmission oil is also good. I use only gear oil/transmission oil in my two strokes as there is no need for a motor oil. Your motor gets its oil through the premix in your fuel. Transmission fluid is formulated strictly with the clutch and transmission in mind. It has a lower viscosity than motor oil which offers a more aggressive clutch feel. Something that confuses people is that they don’t know that SAE classification of gear oil and motor oil are rated different. So for the actual viscosity an Example: 80w gear oil is overall similar viscosity as SAE 10w-40 motor oil. Also motor oil contains additives such as detergents and dispersants to combat byproduct chemicals from gasoline ignition. An engine oil is designed to deal with the products of combustion, whereas a transmission oil does not see contaminants from fuel burning. A transmission in a 2 stroke is a closed system and the lubricant must last for a long period of time. An engine oil must be drained to remove contaminants after a relatively short time and/or mileage compared to a transmission oil. They are designed for 2 different extremes. Yes a motor oil will work well enough in your transmission and the factories recommend it through what the oil vendor/sponsor says for whatever their reasons are but it’s not the best oil you could be running in your transmission. 

C4F8C558-BD0D-4118-9593-15D19DCBE7F3.jpeg

Edited by Powerban
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23 minutes ago, Powerban said:

I been using Amsoil Synthetic DIRT transmission fluid SAE 80 with no discoloration and very good overall condition of my clutch. Belray Gear Saver 80w transmission oil is also good. I use only gear oil/transmission oil in my two strokes as there is no need for a motor oil. Your motor gets its oil through the premix in your fuel. Transmission fluid is formulated strictly with the clutch and transmission in mind. It has a lower viscosity than motor oil which offers a more aggressive clutch feel. Something that confuses people is that they don’t know that SAE classification of gear oil and motor oil are rated different. So for the actual viscosity an Example: 80w gear oil is overall similar viscosity as SAE 10w-40 motor oil. Also motor oil contains additives such as detergents and dispersants to combat byproduct chemicals from gasoline ignition. An engine oil is designed to deal with the products of combustion, whereas a transmission oil does not see contaminants from fuel burning. A transmission in a 2 stroke is a closed system and the lubricant must last for a long period of time. An engine oil must be drained to remove contaminants after a relatively short time and/or mileage compared to a transmission oil. They are designed for 2 different extremes. Yes a motor oil will work well enough in your transmission and the factories recommend it through what the oil vendor/sponsor says for whatever their reasons are but it’s not the best oil you could be running in your transmission. 

C4F8C558-BD0D-4118-9593-15D19DCBE7F3.jpeg

Where are you purchasing the Amsoil at?  Locally the only place I can get Motorex or Bel Ray is at the dealer.  I wouldn't mind Amsoil if it can be found at other places than bike shops.

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11 minutes ago, flyfisher117 said:

Where are you purchasing the Amsoil at?  Locally the only place I can get Motorex or Bel Ray is at the dealer.  I wouldn't mind Amsoil if it can be found at other places than bike shops.

I’m an Amsoil dealer so I order a case at a time for myself. That’s why I’ve switched to it but I’m happy with the results. 

Edited by Powerban

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On 2/12/2019 at 8:59 AM, Powerban said:

I been using Amsoil Synthetic DIRT transmission fluid SAE 80 with no discoloration and very good overall condition of my clutch. Belray Gear Saver 80w transmission oil is also good. I use only gear oil/transmission oil in my two strokes as there is no need for a motor oil. Your motor gets its oil through the premix in your fuel. Transmission fluid is formulated strictly with the clutch and transmission in mind. It has a lower viscosity than motor oil which offers a more aggressive clutch feel. Something that confuses people is that they don’t know that SAE classification of gear oil and motor oil are rated different. So for the actual viscosity an Example: 80w gear oil is overall similar viscosity as SAE 10w-40 motor oil. Also motor oil contains additives such as detergents and dispersants to combat byproduct chemicals from gasoline ignition. An engine oil is designed to deal with the products of combustion, whereas a transmission oil does not see contaminants from fuel burning. A transmission in a 2 stroke is a closed system and the lubricant must last for a long period of time. An engine oil must be drained to remove contaminants after a relatively short time and/or mileage compared to a transmission oil. They are designed for 2 different extremes. Yes a motor oil will work well enough in your transmission and the factories recommend it through what the oil vendor/sponsor says for whatever their reasons are but it’s not the best oil you could be running in your transmission. 

C4F8C558-BD0D-4118-9593-15D19DCBE7F3.jpeg

Hey Powerban just wondering if you know using the Amsoil Synthetic DIRT transmission fluid you can go longer intervals between oil changes? I know in my other stuff that I have ran Amsoil in it has allowed me to go longer intervals between changes and just wondering if that could be applied to the 2 stroke bikes as well. I just sold my 4 stroke and was looking forward to not having to do such frequent oil changes when i pick up a 2 stoke but looks like a lot of guys on here change it in really short intervals.

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Posted (edited)

The reason many prefer to use a less expensive lubricant (less expensive doesn't mean it's not up to the job) is that a separate sump gearbox has no oil filter.

The longer you leave the oil in service, the more metallic debris gets circulated over and over thru the parts.

 

Oil is cheap versus gearbox and clutch components,

a 15 minute oil change is faster and simpler than splitting the cases and troubleshooting a shifting issue.

Edited by mlatour

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9 hours ago, Giver800 said:

Hey Powerban just wondering if you know using the Amsoil Synthetic DIRT transmission fluid you can go longer intervals between oil changes? I know in my other stuff that I have ran Amsoil in it has allowed me to go longer intervals between changes and just wondering if that could be applied to the 2 stroke bikes as well. I just sold my 4 stroke and was looking forward to not having to do such frequent oil changes when i pick up a 2 stoke but looks like a lot of guys on here change it in really short intervals.

Yes, I have been able to go longer intervals between oil changes compared to a motor oil or ATF. It’s holds up better without shearing viscosity and in return not allowing the clutch slip.

 Amsoil Synthetic DIRT transmission fluid is designed specifically for motorcycle applications. It has the correct frictional properties for Motorcycles that results in a consistent and tight clutch feel. This also contributes to the holding power, or static friction, between the plates once the clutch lever has been let all the way out. Oils with incorrect frictional properties for the application can allow the plates to slip in some circumstances, which you’ll feel as lost power to the ground.

Your oil lasting longer doesn’t have to be based on how long can you go without changing the oil. If you race/ride hard, long hours, rough terrain or environments is your cheap oil really holding up without shearing viscosity? Oil also acts as a heat sink. Through out the course of extreme heat dirt bikes create in the transmission with constant clutch abuse, to retain top level oil protection, keep the clutch from slipping and performance of the bike at peak you’re going to want a better oil for hard racing/riding. 

 

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Yes, I have been able to go longer intervals between oil changes compared to a motor oil or ATF. It’s holds up better without shearing viscosity and in return not allowing the clutch slip.
 Amsoil Synthetic DIRT transmission fluid is designed specifically for motorcycle applications. It has the correct frictional properties for Motorcycles that results in a consistent and tight clutch feel. This also contributes to the holding power, or static friction, between the plates once the clutch lever has been let all the way out. Oils with incorrect frictional properties for the application can allow the plates to slip in some circumstances, which you’ll feel as lost power to the ground.
Your oil lasting longer doesn’t have to be based on how long can you go without changing the oil. If you race/ride hard, long hours, rough terrain or environments is your cheap oil really holding up without shearing viscosity? Oil also acts as a heat sink. Through out the course of extreme heat dirt bikes create in the transmission with constant clutch abuse, to retain top level oil protection, keep the clutch from slipping and performance of the bike at peak you’re going to want a better oil for hard racing/riding. 
 
Sounds good. Thanks. How long do you go between changes usually? For the most part I wont be doing hard riding only maybe once in a while will I get technical or hard riding.

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