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Lowering the Xtrainer

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It looks I'm going to have to lower our new bike for the little lady to ride it. I ordered the Kouba 10.1  link. It says it drops it .893". What would I raise the forks, the same? Thanks for any advice. Hoping someone using the same link will chime in.

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I haven't used one but I have researched them a bit for the same reason you're buying yours.  As with any other suspension height change, to retain the current handling and steering characteristics the forks should be raised in the clamps (steering head lowered) the same distance the rear is lowered.  I'd base this off of your own before & after measurements, rather than the published theoretical lowering capability of the link.  This is because the actual amount the link lowers the bike will depend on where you set race sag after installation.

Also bear in mind that the lowering links are longer than stock links.  This increases both leverage and swingarm shock travel range, which also decreases the effective rating of your spring.  Koubalink doesn't seem to say how much, but similar Yamalinks are known to decrease effective spring rate 10% to 15%.  In other words the shock spring will feel softer after installing the Koubalink.

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What you are talking about is one way, but on a new XT I would try a different approach

 

If lowering I'd first try the seat. If I needed more I would have a shop install a drop kit in the forks and shock with the stock link. It's more money up front but then it's set. There is not a lot of room to raise the forks, they are hard to adjust as-is with stock risers. Just my .02

 

 

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It is suggested that you try the lower seat, and setting the springs/sag properly for her weight, I would not be surprised if the standard XT is sprung too heavy for her weight when it comes to the sag. THEN let her try it for a day or two. The only proper way to lower suspension is internally for off road motorcycles. Some suspension tuners only charge a very small fee for both ends. I think LT Racing charges bout $100.00 (both ends) in conjunction with revalving.

My girlfriend rides a WR250R, she can't touch the ground with both feet except on tippy toes, and thats with proper springs/sag for her weight. But she rides single tracks very well.

 

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Thanks for the advice. I've got the lower seat coming, that'll be first.

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11 hours ago, drumiv said:

Thanks for the advice. I've got the lower seat coming, that'll be first.

Cool! 

But her weight and the OEM supplied springs are just as important, sag is an important aspect of how its going to react for her. Too stiff, and she will not like it (no pun)

 

I played a lot of games for my girlfriend on the WR, actually the Yamaha springs are no good for a 140 lb person. And because I made her try the bike out oversprung it freaked her out, it took a few rides with the revised suspension before she trusted it to push it on down hills and hitting berms.

I had Les work his magic on the suspension, revalve, lower internally both ends. I figure the better I make to for her the more "fun" rides we will do together. Flipping cheap in whole picture of happiness for her. While the valving pulled everything together, the proper springs and internal lowering was the mandatory part of the equation...... I do not speak Kouba link for the dirt :naughty:

Now she remembers back to when the bike was with the stock suspension and swears I was trying to kill her :rant:

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38 minutes ago, Mark-us-B said:

Cool!  

But her weight and the OEM supplied springs are just as important, sag is an important aspect of how its going to react for her. Too stiff, and she will not like it (no pun)

 

I played a lot of games for my girlfriend on the WR, actually the Yamaha springs are no good for a 140 lb person. And because I made her try the bike out oversprung it freaked her out, it took a few rides with the revised suspension before she trusted it to push it on down hills and hitting berms.

I had Les work his magic on the suspension, revalve, lower internally both ends. I figure the better I make to for her the more "fun" rides we will do together. Flipping cheap in whole picture of happiness for her. While the valving pulled everything together, the proper springs and internal lowering was the mandatory part of the equation...... I do not speak Kouba link for the dirt :naughty:

Now she remembers back to when the bike was with the stock suspension and swears I was trying to kill her :rant:

Good points, and according to my interpretation of the Italians' interpretation of English, it needs about 5/8" more static sag. No mention of rider sag, so I'm going to go  with 105ish. Not going to do anything 'till after I do a break-in ride this weekend. Since I'm not about to ask the war department what she weighs, springs / set-up will be trial and error.

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Good points, and according to my interpretation of the Italians' interpretation of English, it needs about 5/8" more static sag. No mention of rider sag, so I'm going to go  with 105ish. Not going to do anything 'till after I do a break-in ride this weekend. Since I'm not about to ask the war department what she weighs, springs / set-up will be trial and error.

How much sag is covered elsewhere so I won't beat that to death here. But remember you have less suspension travel then other bikes like a KTM. 105 will give a pretty mellow handling bike especially given her weight. Not telling you what to do I suggest you try it and report back. If it feels like it's wallowing can always Jack it up till it gets nervous

 

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38 minutes ago, drumiv said:

Good points, and according to my interpretation of the Italians' interpretation of English, it needs about 5/8" more static sag. No mention of rider sag, so I'm going to go  with 105ish. Not going to do anything 'till after I do a break-in ride this weekend. Since I'm not about to ask the war department what she weighs, springs / set-up will be trial and error.

Keep in mind that Xtrainer rear suspension travel is 270mm vs. 300mm or so on most bigger bikes.  So if you're following the common practice of setting rider sag to 1/3 of travel you may want to target 90mm rather than 100mm.  Just something else to think about.

Mine works great set to 95mm rider and 26mm static.

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