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Stuck countershaft spacer

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I bought a new to me drz400s 2011 about a year ago . The po did the lock tite fix on the countershaft sprocket but used to much red lock tite. So after a lot of frustration heat and what the f****** .I tried a little finesse and only griped a little and spun the spacer instead of pulling. Needless to say I felt like a retard. I hope this helps someone.

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I do not understand what you are trying to say.  Getting the spacer off can be a little difficult.  Did you get it off?  Why did you need to take it off? Gripping with pliers and turning while pulling is the usual technique to remove the spacer.

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I've had a few spacers that I was not able to remove with pliers and twisting. What worked as a large pair of vice grips and then a gear puller on the shaft and vice grips.

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I do not understand what you are trying to say.  Getting the spacer off can be a little difficult.  Did you get it off?  Why did you need to take it off? Gripping with pliers and turning while pulling is the usual technique to remove the spacer.

I did get if off. What I was saying is I was gripping it to tight with the vice grips causing the spacer to pinch the countershaft. Not one of my brightest moments. My countershaft seal was leaking. I think what caused it was mud and sand.

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I've had a few spacers that I was not able to remove with pliers and twisting. What worked as a large pair of vice grips and then a gear puller on the shaft and vice grips.

Good idea thanks for the reply.
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I am actually having issues with this right now. I just purchased a DRZ and the first thing I checked was the front sprocket... Wouldn't you know- loose nut. So I have got a replacement nut, washer, sprocket, spacer, seal, and a couple screws on the way ready to do the Loctite fix. In my case, it doesn't look like there is any Loctite anywhere from the previous owner. It is a 2001 E model that was ridden mainly offroad, and hard from the looks of it. It looks more like rust than anything that is keeping the spacer stuck on. My question is- when people say to rotate it as they pull off, is the spacer supposed to freely rotate on the splines of the countershaft? When I pull and rotate, I am just rotating the whole countershaft along with the spacer.

This is the first night I have tried, so I will keep hitting it with penetrating oil every now and then and keep trying. I shouldn't need to use heat if there is no Loctite, right?

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Geez I feel like an idiot. I had a sudden epiphany that OP probably experienced and intended with this post. I will submit my stupidity to the forum gods, so this is on record for anyone else googling: Put the bike in gear to rotate the spacer as you pull on it. And yes- it should rotate. Another option would probably be to install the nut on the countershaft and hold it separately from the spacer with plyers to try and rotate separately from the spline as you pull. Hope this helps others.

Long day at work today...

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The spacer is just that a spacer, it is not splined, so is it will rotate and doing so as you lightly clamp on it with some pliers will help remove it from the shaft.
When someone way over does the amount of thread lock during the loc tite fix, that excess can seem under the spacer and affix the spacer to the splined shaft... 
In a lot of years now I've had only one that would not come off with pliers and just pulling/ twisting, at worst adding a little heat from a heat gun (well below temp that will damage the seal) .. That one had to be broken loose with a punch and hammer. Drilled a small divot in the spacer to give the end of a punch a place to catch, and hit the spacer to rotate it, then heated to further breakdown the thread lock (actually he used stud and bearing mount and I think purchased it in the gallon size)

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Make sure when you torque the sprocket back up that the counter shaft spins without any binding. The nut doesn't come loose, the stack up height of components it tightens against becomes shorter. If the 2nd gear bushing is too deformed it will bind and could possibly seize.

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Yeah that is a concern to me for sure. The old sprocket had quite a bit of play in it, and the nut was very "loose". How much squash can we have before things begin to bind on the countershaft? Is there an estimate in millimeters? I don't mean to hijack the thread, but what sort of torque should I put on the countershaft nut? I have seen conflicting numbers and was just going to go with the most up to date numbers I could find. I almost feel like in this scenario, lower ft/lbs would be better if I use a drop of loctite on the threads and do the loctite fix on the splines for the sprocket. How do you guys feel about that? Because like you said, it's not an issue with the nut coming loose- we're just looking to reduce the rocking back and forth on the splines.

Thanks for the help, Erik and Ohiodrz.

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19 hours ago, Wiztardo said:
Yeah that is a concern to me for sure. The old sprocket had quite a bit of play in it, and the nut was very "loose". How much squash can we have before things begin to bind on the countershaft? Is there an estimate in millimeters? I don't mean to hijack the thread, but what sort of torque should I put on the countershaft nut? I have seen conflicting numbers and was just going to go with the most up to date numbers I could find. I almost feel like in this scenario, lower ft/lbs would be better if I use a drop of loctite on the threads and do the loctite fix on the splines for the sprocket. How do you guys feel about that? Because like you said, it's not an issue with the nut coming loose- we're just looking to reduce the rocking back and forth on the splines.
Thanks for the help, Erik and Ohiodrz.


I don’t think anybody’s ever actually taken a measurement. I would also say without a known and common reference point, I doubt it wouldn’t be much use.

It’s kind of a works or doesn’t work thing,  tighten the sprocket countershaft nut, take the chain off spin the counter shaft by hand if it rotates freely you’re good to go

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