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Up/Down swingarm play

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It's not bearings. I rebuilt linkage couple years ago and been regreasing since then. Tracked it down to the frame to linkage bolt. It's just ever so lightly ovaled out. It's letting the rear tire move 5mm without any movement from the shock. Usually I like to fix things right but getting a new frame just for that sounds dumb.

 

Thinking about drilling out those holes and installing bushings if I can even find them in that close of tolerances. Then I'd still have to be worried about getting them to line up. I can attribute this problem to those years I was riding with seized linkage bearings and my tire was just slamming into everything, stupid I know.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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More I dig around I think it might be more than just that one bolt. Maby I just need to get all new linkage bolts. Am I correct in thinking there should be zero play in the swing arm?

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Zero play would be great but that's going to be difficult to accomplish.  I keep the bearings in good condition and tolerate what remains.

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That was kinda my train of thought too. Counted 8 pivot points in the crf linkage. Am still getting all new bolts everywhere, if that gets me too 2 or 3 mm of free play I will be happy.

 

Seem Like it would have a ill effect on sag...way I see it, if I have 5mm of play in tire, then it will in turn throw my sag off 5mm. 100mm of sag would actually be 95mm, which most people would consider a lot.

 

 

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Its almost inevitable though.  Every miniscule amount of tolerance in each bearing is multiplied over the length of the swingarm.  As long as its all in good condition, greased and torqued I'd call it good.

Another thing you can do is place a finger on each pivot on the gap between the two moving components and lift the wheel up and down.  You may find one bearing has a lot more play than the others.

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I would check the bolt-to-inner bearing race (long sleeve)itself.  My CR has the same issue at the same pivot, and it was like that even immediately after a full linkage rebuild.  I took the bolt out and slid it through the old spacer, which I believe was oem and there was just a little less clearance.  Probably enough to get rid of most of it, but unfortunately that sleeve was trashed anyways.  

 

I'll probably order an OEM bike and nut eventually, and if it doesn't go away 100% just live with it.  To rule out the frame hole being ovalized, shake the swing arm and look at the bolt head itself to see if it moves.  To me, it seems like at 45lbs or so of torque even if that hole was oval it should still hold enough for a shake test.  While riding is a different story.  

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Bolt head does move when bolt is loose I just know if I try to make it better it will get worse, and I could ask 10 people if that hole looks oval and they would all say no. But every other bolt slops a little in the race then it all gets added and multiplied at the end of the swingarm. I'd love to know my much play is in a brand new never ridden bike.

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16 hours ago, Berm-Saw said:

Bolt head does move when bolt is loose I just know if I try to make it better it will get worse, and I could ask 10 people if that hole looks oval and they would all say no. But every other bolt slops a little in the race then it all gets added and multiplied at the end of the swingarm. I'd love to know my much play is in a brand new never ridden bike.

Zero. Tight as a drum.

When my bike was new any swing arm movement moved the shock, now that it's thrashed I can replace every bearing at the same time and there will still be a tiny bit of play. After I replaced clevis and pull rod I gave up and called it good... Figured it was the female part of the frame where the upper shock bolt goes through and possibly the holes on bottom of the shock itself gaining diameter..

Edited by Casing-daily

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Once a bike gets a few hundred hours it is inevitable. You can replace all the bearings and such but the wearnon the hard surfaces all adds up to the sloppiness.

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