Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Today I was trying to by pass a mud hole and I fell over in it. The bike ran for a few seconds before it shut off. It was about waist deep of silt mud. I walked the bike out. Got it home and the air box was full of muddy water and the air filter was soaked in mud. Checked the carb and there was mud in there to. Took the carb off and there was mud on the engine side. I dranied the oil and did not see mud but it was dark and late so I stopped there. But it does appear there is mud in the engine. So what do you guys think I need to do. It's an 05 CRF 230.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you think mud is in the combustion chamber, i would pull the head and possibly the piston. Dirt inside a engine with destroy it. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might not see mud in the oil...

Everything you described has been limited to a path into the combustion chamber...  Where piston, rings, valves, and cylinder will be ruined in short order if not taken apart and parts cleaned and replaced...

The place where mud would have gotten into the oil is there is a crankcase vent tube that runs from the top of the transmission case to the airbox... That would be the point of entry for mud to get into your tranny and lower end and oil supply...

In any case, with mud as far as you have seen it past the carb... At the very least a top end teardown is necessary.... Fresh piston and rings... Fresh valves and seats...

But if mud went through the crankcase vent tube... A lot more teardown and cleaning is necessary...

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Did you look at the plug?

I haven't pulled the plug yet. I am going to work on it some more after church. I wish I could put my bike on the prayer list today. I think it is going to need it. A prayer maybe all its got.
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The safest option is to pull the top end and clean everything. You didn't say if it was ticking over or revving it's nuts  off in the mud. If it was at idle then I very much doubt you have done much if any damage if it only ran for a few seconds.

If I was on a three or four day ride and that happened or I was 70 miles from the van and stuck, I would pull off the carb and the header, take out the plug and taking a deep breath, fill the combustion chamber with water. then  spin it on the starter to blow all the water out. I would repeat 3 or 4 times then put it all back together and carry on with the ride. Always stick a plug in the plug cap and keep it earthed (grounded to you lot), it protects the cdi.

Over the years, I have drowned bikes loads of times in water that was usually pretty muddy. None ever seemed to suffer.

You have the luxury of being in your workshop, so the choice is yours. Good luck

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The safest option is to pull the top end and clean everything. You didn't say if it was ticking over or revving it's nuts  off in the mud. If it was at idle then I very much doubt you have done much if any damage if it only ran for a few seconds.
If I was on a three or four day ride and that happened or I was 70 miles from the van and stuck, I would pull off the carb and the header, take out the plug and taking a deep breath, fill the combustion chamber with water. then  spin it on the starter to blow all the water out. I would repeat 3 or 4 times then put it all back together and carry on with the ride. Always stick a plug in the plug cap and keep it earthed (grounded to you lot), it protects the cdi.
Over the years, I have drowned bikes loads of times in water that was usually pretty muddy. None ever seemed to suffer.
You have the luxury of being in your workshop, so the choice is yours. Good luck

Thanks, that lifted my spirits. It was just running at idle. It was in the mud for awhile because it was like quick sand. It was hard for me to get out because my boots were sucked down to the bottom. So I would move a step and drag the bike. I had some help but it was hard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I highly reccommend you pull the topend and throughly clean it. Dirt, mud, silt, dust anything but clean air is harmful to an engine and your valves. A cylinder, piston and valve job is gonna cost around $1000 to do yourself. I wouldnt risk it. Just my 2 cent.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Cdizzle666 said:

I highly reccommend you pull the topend and throughly clean it. Dirt, mud, silt, dust anything but clean air is harmful to an engine and your valves. A cylinder, piston and valve job is gonna cost around $1000 to do yourself. I wouldnt risk it. Just my 2 cent.

For sure the best option is to strip and clean but new piston, rings, valves and seats? No way. Just give it a good clean  and I would bet there is no damage. The moment anything wet gets in there, it shorts the plug and the engine stops. All it should cost you is a head and base gasket and a few hours.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Fernacticus said:

For sure the best option is to strip and clean but new piston, rings, valves and seats? No way. Just give it a good clean  and I would bet there is no damage. The moment anything wet gets in there, it shorts the plug and the engine stops. All it should cost you is a head and base gasket and a few hours.

 

Sorry what i was trying to say was not cleaning it could potentially ruin the topend of the motor and cost you rings piston valves cylinder. If you clean it, youll be fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, be thankful you wasn't under the bike and alone! I wouldn't worry much about damage, but a good cleaning is in order. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Run some clean water in it... - I'm joking

 

Take the head off and clean it. Take some carb cleaner and spray the metal parts clean (clean EVERYTHING)(wipe them off and put little drops of oil in them to re-lube the part, especially bearings)

 

Just keep the carb cleaner away from rubber parts (valve seals, o-rings, etc)

 

If for some reason this doesn't work (it really should! Most people flip them over and have them dry!?), your going to have to replace the parts they mentioned anyways. Why not try to clean it and see if it works?!?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow, be thankful you wasn't under the bike and alone! I wouldn't worry much about damage, but a good cleaning is in order. 

As we were loading the bike fire and rescue was coming in the park. A lady had flipped her four wheeler without a helmet. So I was thinking as crappy a day I was having it could be a lot worse. (I also lost my GoPro about an hour earlier)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Smoking 2's said:

1gr what did you do....

Well, our mudding 4wheelers are old, fixer ups that we bought to kill. Like 2000 models that we paid, like $500 for broken. So we have never tried to take care of them, but rather seem as though we are trying to abuse them. One particular, a 600 grizzly sucks in through the exhaust. We are not going to tear it down every time. We pull the plug, drain the muddy water, pour in a little 2 stroke oil so it is lubed well for the extended cranking time required. We drain the oil, most times it takes 3 times, if it's milky, change the filter on the last change, check to carb mouth for trash, check the air filter..... and then fire it up. But we know that one day, it will have more than swamp water in it. But so far so good. But being that a dirtbike motor is easier to tear into, and usually more valuable, I would take it down if you know trash is in the combustion chamber. Dirty water will evaporate leaving what looks like mud on the walls of the carb, but usually, mud does not get past the air filter. If it were mine, I would decide as to how valuable it is. If there is doubt that mud is inside, flush it good with diesel fuel, carb  and pipe off.. and see what comes out, the combustion chamber, not the oil case. Their will not be trash in your oil, only water. And you may not have any. But it needs to be checked. Just plan on an oil change. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

+1 diesel, learned that a few years back in sail boating... Yes I'm I sailor but don't wear a bandana around my neck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Cdizzle666 said:

I highly reccommend you pull the topend and throughly clean it. Dirt, mud, silt, dust anything but clean air is harmful to an engine and your valves. A cylinder, piston and valve job is gonna cost around $1000 to do yourself. I wouldnt risk it. Just my 2 cent.

Straight up... Embedded abrasive just keeps on wearing things at an accelerated rate...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Fernacticus said:

For sure the best option is to strip and clean but new piston, rings, valves and seats? No way. Just give it a good clean  and I would bet there is no damage. The moment anything wet gets in there, it shorts the plug and the engine stops. All it should cost you is a head and base gasket and a few hours.

 

There is no way in God's green earth that I would EVER tell someone who saw mud get through his intake tract to just clean it up a bit.... 

Not to mention what could have went through the crankcase vent into the cases...

Plus, I would not pull a top end down and invest in time and gaskets without putting in a fresh piston at the very least... If I'm pulling it down, I'm getting the most for my time and effort...

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×