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So I just rebuilt my forks (no revalving just replaced wear items) and I put them right on the first line, stock they were just about flush and I felt I was choppering a bit which I thought might be my rear spring but I weigh 160 which should be right in the stock spring weight range. Anyway I figured it was probably the fork height so I put them at the first line when I put them back in.

For starters, I'm pretty sure just changing the oil out from whatever was supposedly in there to a proper 5W oil made a massive massive difference. I'm not sure about other years but mines a 2016 300RR and if you've still got the stock oil in yours I'd highly suggest getting that swapped out asap, that stuff was horrible. Fork action changed dramatically with different oil. (I still think a revalve would make even further big improvements but the rebuild alone really changed these forks a lot, WAY more plush in the top 1/4 to 1/3 of the stroke)

Anyway aside from that, I'm just wondering where folks are running there forks, I think putting them at the first line helped balance it out but I'm thinking about even going to the second line. I ride almost exclusively extremely tight rocky mountains, boulders, etc etc rarely am I going very fast except to cruise into town on the road to get gas.

Is there a common consensus on where folks are running there forks?

Edited by gr4vitas

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It depends on what terrain you ride. I'm doing a few hare scrambles now so I needed the bike to turn better. I have about 10mm showing past the triples. I like it that way and it suits the fatty front tire I'm running now. I'm only running 98mm of rear sag too.

 

For slow speed stuff, it's not as critical in my opinion.

 

 

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I have the same bike as yours, I had the forks at the 1st line but moved them to the 2nd and I like it much more, steering is a little quicker, easier to get the rear to move more now and steer with the back tire and it's stable at speed even in the rough stuff. My sag is at 100 and I weigh 163 nekked. 

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Cool thanks for the info fellas.

 

8 minutes ago, silver_fox said:

I have the same bike as yours, I had the forks at the 1st line but moved them to the 2nd and I like it much more, steering is a little quicker, easier to get the rear to move more now and steer with the back tire and it's stable at speed even in the rough stuff. My sag is at 100 and I weigh 163 nekked. 

 

Just curious, did you have to make much (if any) adjustment from the factory rear sag setting for your weight?

 

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Just now, gr4vitas said:

Cool thanks for the info fellas.

 

 

Just curious, did you have to make much (if any) adjustment from the factory rear sag setting for your weight?

 

Out of the box my sag was 106. It had the chopper feel in corners and didn't turn as good as it does now. I haven't done anything with the suspension other than increase compression and rebound 3-4 clicks, set sag at 100 and moved forks to 2nd line.

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For what it's worth, I think you can tweak, mess with, adjust and spend tons of money on suspension in the effort to get it just right and still never be happy with the results. I think alot of riders blame poor handling on suspension when it's actually incorrect body position that's the culprit. From '78 to 2010, most of my riding experience has been mx and the last 7 years is mainly  bush off-road / hare scramble stuff, in both types of riding even small changes in body position can make a huge difference. Stand as much as possible and learn to feel the effects of where you are positioned and distributing weight. I'm not good at explaining it but search some of the Chris Birch vids or sign up for one of his riding clinics if offered in your area.

Edited by silver_fox

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2 minutes ago, silver_fox said:

For what it's worth, I think you can tweak, mess with, adjust and spend tons of money on suspension in the effort to get it just right and still never be happy with the results. I think alot of riders blame poor handling on suspension when it's actually incorrect body position that's the culprit. From '78 to 2010, most of my riding experience has been mx and the last 7 years is mainly  bush off-road / hare scramble stuff. Stand as much as possible and learn to feel the effects of where you are positioned and distributing weight. I'm not good at explaining it but search some of the Chris Birch vids or sign up for one of his riding clinics if offered in your area.

No I understand what you mean, I think you need to get your suspension to a certain point, like not deflecting on trail trash and the small sharp stuff, and generally moving through the stroke as it should but otherwise it really comes down to handling the bike, especially when it comes to more technical stuff.

A lot of the guys I ride with blast down really nasty rocky rooty trails at light speed, which is commendable but they're only able to do so because they've got their suspension so soft they'd bottom out on a 2 foot drop, furthermore after riding some of their bikes they've got no feel of the wheels. When we get into the mountains though and start riding up very steep stream beds with large rocks they're all over the place (lack of balance) meanwhile I pluck my way along in first and second without touching a foot, sometimes coming to a complete stop for a second.

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17 hours ago, silver_fox said:

For what it's worth, I think you can tweak, mess with, adjust and spend tons of money on suspension in the effort to get it just right and still never be happy with the results. I think alot of riders blame poor handling on suspension when it's actually incorrect body position that's the culprit. From '78 to 2010, most of my riding experience has been mx and the last 7 years is mainly  bush off-road / hare scramble stuff, in both types of riding even small changes in body position can make a huge difference. Stand as much as possible and learn to feel the effects of where you are positioned and distributing weight. I'm not good at explaining it but search some of the Chris Birch vids or sign up for one of his riding clinics if offered in your area.

True to a point, but the Beta is rear low and excessively demanding of body position and rear sag to maintain front end traction.  Coming from GGs this is very obvious, from KTMs no because they have an unstable feel as welll.  Raising the rear 15mm and increasing the sag to 105-107mm transforms the bike,  its amazing.  No more sitting on the gas cap in smooth turns and its still stable.  I run YZ250F KYBs flush, which is the same front height as stock forks to the first line. 

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No.  The problem for me was the 95 - 100mm max sag to get the bike balanced and front to stick  compromised the ride in technical rocky stuff.  I have an XTrig and would adjust sag and also HS compression based on terrain but it got old and wasn't the right solution.  I lengthened the shock,  increased sag,  front end confidence is like never before.  Now it feels flat and balanced, but plush in the rear, more neutral or normal,  not a low seat chopper anymore.  Also what I notice is it touches down a lot less in the rocks.  I valve my own suspension and now I can tell the fork rebound has to go lighter from where I had it to hold the front end down before.  Between this and the 250 conversion the bike is awesome. 

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An alternative that I have not seen mentioned in this tread is to run a 120/100 rear tire.  I had a number of Pirelli's MX-S Extra's and they measured 12mm taller to the axel (with the full bike weight ) than a standard 110/100.  I have since used these up and went back to a 110/100 tire requiring me to reduce sag to 100mm from 105 mm and push forks up 9mm (3rd line).  The biggest challenge I have is when testing new tires it is easy to screw up the balance of the bike.

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I have had some big tires too, mostly 120 size MT-16s.  Problem is they tend to be heavier to steer with.  Trade one problem for another.  Usually I use them in the rocks because it doesn't matter much there.  Now, I run 110 rears (Shinko Cheater for rocks or Starcross 5 soft for sand) with 105 - 107mm sag and an M59 front and its on rails. 

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