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Exc not for road use?

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So many people say that exc model is a race oriented bike that happens to be street legal. Then why can't I just ride pavement for hours and not worry about longevity and decreasing the life of motor. Are newer model excf's  better equiped for road use. Yes I want a competent bike for the dirt but why is there always a compromise. I have spent thousanda of dollars trying to mod my crfl into more dirtworthy bike. Finally realizedbit will never be what I want and I should have just got a ktm in the first place. The one thing holding me back is will I now spend thousands on maintaining the exc for my intended pavement & dirt use. Damn.. Sorry for the long winded post.

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People are getting 10's of thousands of miles on these newer gen 500's in the dirt and street. If you rode primarily on street you'd be totally fine. Just keep changing oil and keeping air filter clean

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34 minutes ago, Engstrom said:

People are getting 10's of thousands of miles on these newer gen 500's in the dirt and street. If you rode primarily on street you'd be totally fine. Just keep changing oil and keeping air filter clean

I'd even go so far as to say keep the oil clean, worry less about the air filter... clean and re-oil it when it needs it... be it when it harms performance or just before the oil dries out.

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New generation...is that the 2017 models. I did buy 08 excr but thinking of trading up for newer. The 08 was neglected by P.O.and he adverIised the bike as excellent condition. I pointed out several things that needed attention ( cs seal leak, possible slave cylinder rebuild, oil puking out vent) plastic rad shrouds broken from moint. No turn signals. Horn not working. Odometer/hr meter not working. He claimed the bike had 2080 miles but that's what odometer was showing when it quit and he finally admitted he doesn't know the actual miles. So good possibility there are alot more miles on motor than advertised. Serioisly thinking trading up 

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When you want any machine to do two different things (be good on both the highway and the dirt for example)...some compromise is inevitable....that's pretty much down to the laws of physics...and basic logic. 

As they always said in the film business (and many others I'm sure)...there are three options in life ...good, fast and cheap...for whatever it is you are trying to accomplish....pick any two!!  That's reality!

In terms of the 500 EXC...the bike is a very good compromise....IE pretty much the best of both worlds.  As others have said...drive it in a civilized manner and do good basic maintenance and you really should not have much in the way of issues.  You will have tire issues...highway riding wears out good quality, knobby dirt tires very quickly....so you may need two sets of wheels and tires....and you will likely come up against a few other issues...but none of them are overly serious.  Just treat the bike well and you will reap the rewards of probably the best bike out there for true dual-purpose capability.

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A street mile is easier on a motorcycle than a dirt mile.  Same with a street hour and a dirt hour.

The problem is that street miles add up way faster than dirt miles.

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Maintain it like normal and you're fine. I've heard that argument, and i'm sorry, but riding easy on the STREET is NOT more abusive on the motor than dirt/racing/track use where more throttle is used and vibration/impacts are constant.

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6 hours ago, LS1Steve said:

Maintain it like normal and you're fine. I've heard that argument, and i'm sorry, but riding easy on the STREET is NOT more abusive on the motor than dirt/racing/track use where more throttle is used and vibration/impacts are constant.

That's kinda like what I was thinking. No high revs and no lugging. Prob ride once every 2 weeks consisting of 50 miles street with 25 miles of gravel fire roads and occasional single track use. 

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Although it's an older model 08 exc. Still gonna ride the thing either way. I suppose there's no sense worrying about it. Replace seals, rings etc as needed. Just don't like the idea of a ticking time bomb motor.

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I've got nearly 30k miles on my 525.  Closing in on 1k hours. 

On its 5th piston.  Replaced crank bearings with the heavy-duty roller bearings at ~6k, replaced the mag-side bearing last summer since it felt a little "crunchy". 

Maintain it, they'll run just fine street or dirt.

157-FILE0732_-L.jpg

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I ride an 06 525 that i bought used in 2012 and have no idea how many hours/ miles were on it when i got it. Since then I have put about 7000 miles on it and finally did a total rebuild this winter. Piston, rings and head rebuilt, and main bearings was all i did. My transmission was pristine and the only reason I did the main bearings was preventive maintenance.
I'm sure I'll get another solid 10 years of awesome performance from this bike and i ride about %75 dirt and %25 pavement.
These exc's are truly the best all around bike made

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I think it depends on your expectations/mindset and what you are willing to do for light weight and high performance.

For example, KTM guys are fine with a complete motor tear down after 7000 miles but a DR650 guy would be adjusting their valves for the 2nd time, maybe.  The DR650 guys figures easily 20,000 miles before he ever sees his piston.  

Unfortunately there isn't a miracle bike ... no light weight, high performance, dirt/street bike that will go 20,000 on the original piston.  

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The older ktms had weak crank issues, the newer ones have very large bearings without the crank spread issues and better rod bearing, a totally different concept of reliability.

Its fairly safe to say the 2014/2015 models, are the best reliability wise that ktm has ever achieved (they decided to screw with that on the 2017) , but 30,0000 mile ktm exc (800 hour )pistons  are out there .

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3 hours ago, Silverbird said:

So the 2017's aren't set up to be as reliable?

The changes to the 17's 500's, (reliability wise) aren't fully known yet, I haven't seen anything  that improved reliability with what they did, compacted the motor more , thinned metal, less oil, were the main changes  noted. They seem to have went to a different piston, where the Mahle pistons of previous era seem to have been fairly bullet proof .

 

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Hey I just bought one. Ride it on the street for a while. Your rear end will go out long before it's top end :/

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I am getting one this week.  What went out and what else should I look for?


I was just referring to the torture device they call a seat. :)
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6 hours ago, Spud786 said:

The changes to the 17's 500's, (reliability wise) aren't fully known yet, I haven't seen anything  that improved reliability with what they did, compacted the motor more , thinned metal, less oil, were the main changes  noted. They seem to have went to a different piston, where the Mahle pistons of previous era seem to have been fairly bullet proof .

 

You see that thread over on advrider ttitled something like "2017 500 and 350 exc" or something like that. There's a guy with just a couple hours on his 500 and he posted a picture of the outer part of the cylinder head had a casting crack running down it. Yikes.

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