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Am I Too Heavy??

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Hi I just a real quick question am i too heavy?

Ive been noticing for a while now that i have to hit jumps harder and faster than my other moto buddys that weigh around 150 to 180 i weigh 225 so do you think its me weighing myself down or am i doing something wrong? I ride a 16 300 xc and my all buds have 450s. could it be my bike just not having the tourqe the 450 has to just lift you up anything?

 

Any Opinions Will Be Greatly Appriciated

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I think the 450 vs 300XC has more to do with having to hit jumps harder than your weight. On a 2 stroke you have to carry corner speed and get the power to the ground. I see guys on 450's totally blow the turn, pop out of the rut and come to a complete stop then crack the throttle on the face and clear a table top that I have to do everything right to make on a 2 stroke.

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If you get it sprung for your weight it makes all the difference.  I'm also 6' 220 and use to race 250 twostrokes with no problems doing all the jumps.  Maybe you already have idk. 

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Are you sitting when you hit jumps or standing? If you are standing and all your friends are sitting that could be why.

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Always riding with smaller guys I encounter this all the time. When we all rode 2 strokes I was already on a 250 when my friends were still on 125's. If they were in 3rd gear pinned, my starting point was 4th gear half throttle with a hard blip on the face. Meaning being 50-75lbs heavier I had to have way more momentum for the same jumps.

 

I always let them hit stuff first because I had a tendency to underjump until I heard what they were hitting it at.

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So here is some physics for you. You are pulled down at the same rate regardless of weight. Acceleration from gravity is constant and independent of mass. As soon as your rear tire leaves the face. Your weight makes no difference in the actual air part of jumping.

What happens on the jump face and the few bike lengths before the lip are what determine your parth. Speed, suspension rebound and body movements are what control your trajectory. If your cornering at the same speed as you friends, and they are jumping further then you, then it's probably them being on the gas harder and leaving the lip going faster then you. You being  heavier does mean your bike wont accelerate as fast as light riders, but that isn't relevant to amateur riders. The speed difference between 450's and 300's isn't going to be enough to make one jump further then the other due to power. so don't worry, it's not the bike.

 

Edited by temporarily_locked
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Good physics...I agree your mass doesn't make a difference once you leave the face of the jump...it is determined by your speed on the face....Your speed on the face of the jump is determined by your speed through the turns and your acceleration out of the turns...So, given the same bike, a lighter rider can carry more speed through turns and accelerate faster to the face of a jump and achieve a higher speed and longer jump...

 

Of course, small differences in weight and bike power are negligible relative to experience and technique...but imagine the difference of a 150lb rider and a 225lb rider...75lbs...I bet that's noticeable.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Sofiedog said:

Good physics...I agree your mass doesn't make a difference once you leave the face of the jump...it is determined by your speed on the face....Your speed on the face of the jump is determined by your speed through the turns and your acceleration out of the turns...So, given the same bike, a lighter rider can carry more speed through turns and accelerate faster to the face of a jump and achieve a higher speed and longer jump...

 

Of course, small differences in weight and bike power are negligible relative to experience and technique...but imagine the difference of a 150lb rider and a 225lb rider...75lbs...I bet that's noticeable.

 

 

If you assume bike weight to be 250 lb, that 50% difference in rider weight is only a 19% difference in combine rider /bike weight. Noticeable? Yeah. But in practice it makes little difference for amateurs.

 

On 90 percent of jumps, if you can corner well , you can over jump so far to flat it's disgusting. Even if your on the husky side, weight isn't going to hold you back.

 

Edited by temporarily_locked

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If you assume bike weight to be 250 lb, that 50% difference in rider weight is only a 19% difference in combine rider /bike weight. Noticeable? Yeah. But in practice it makes little difference for amateurs.

 

On 90 percent of jumps, if you can corner well , you can over jump so far to flat it's disgusting. Even if your on the husky side, weight isn't going to hold you back.

 

I agree with you. Its amazing how many new bikes are sold with the premise that a couple of hp more or a few pounds less is going to give you faster lap times. Its only seat time practicing good techniques and improving your fitness that really makes you faster...I've been smoked by many a "husky" rider...

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On 4/19/2017 at 0:26 PM, GJ Enduro said:

 

Hi I just a real quick question am i too heavy?

Ive been noticing for a while now that i have to hit jumps harder and faster than my other moto buddys that weigh around 150 to 180 i weigh 225 so do you think its me weighing myself down or am i doing something wrong? I ride a 16 300 xc and my all buds have 450s. could it be my bike just not having the tourqe the 450 has to just lift you up anything?

 

Any Opinions Will Be Greatly Appriciated

 

I recommend trying to ride one of their 450's. These bikes these days have some real power. Like Still Smoking stated, the 450's are very forgiving if you don't keep your speed into a corner. A little crack more throttle and you can just about make anything.

RIDE BEWARE: If you ride a 450f on a track you may never go back to your 300cc

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20 hours ago, yamaha56 said:

I recommend trying to ride one of their 450's. These bikes these days have some real power. Like Still Smoking stated, the 450's are very forgiving if you don't keep your speed into a corner. A little crack more throttle and you can just about make anything.

RIDE BEWARE: If you ride a 450f on a track you may never go back to your 300cc

450 - the vet bike of choice...

I took out my 250 yesterday after having ridden my new 450 for the two months. Although I sound more impressive on the 250, the 450 makes things so much easier.

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