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XR400R and XR100R - What maintenance is needed after sitting for years?

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Hello All,

First time posting here, as I am getting back into dirt biking after a 15 year break. Been riding street bikes for over 30 years, currently a 2010 BMW R1200R Roadster.

My 10 year old son has shown some major interest in riding, and it happens that my friend has TWO bikes which he was riding with his (now grown and out of the house) son, which he will sell to me. Both bikes are at his cabin and we will pick them up this weekend. My buddy does not exactly remember what year the bikes are, but believes they are around the year 2000. I will be able to exactly determine this once we have the bikes picked up.

There is a XR400R and a XR100R, both bikes have been sitting and have not been fired or ridden in 10 years.

Now to my question to you PRO's out there, ......................... What all should be done to these bikes to bring them back to top notch riding condition? Below list is what I would do to the bikes, but would like your expert opinions to let me know if I got this all covered or if I forgot something major:

- Drain old gas and gas lines, clean gas tank, flush lines.

- New Spark Plug.

- Oil and filter change.

- Brake Fluid change.

- Check all cables (brake and clutch) and inspect brake pads.

- As the tires are more than 10 years old, I would get new rubber installed on both bikes.

 

Any input you have here is greatly appreciated, thank you very much. I attached pictures of both bikes and I would also like to hear your opinions in regards to what you think based on the pics.

THANKS IN ADVANCE!

XR400R.jpg

XR400R1.jpg

XR100R.jpg

XR100R1.jpg

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I wouldnt try to ride them without clean carburetors and it sounds like you are addressing the tires.  I don't worry about tires as much as I do tubes leaving me walking,  past the obvious.  The tires will likely not grip as well as they would when new.  Check valve clearances is my practice on any long time stored 4 stroke.  Occasionally you find one that is stuck.  

Edited by ossagp

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3 minutes ago, ossagp said:

I wouldnt try to ride them without clean carburetors and it sounds like you are addressing the tires.  I don't worry about tires as much as I do tubes leaving me walking,  past the obvious.  The tires will likely not grip as well as they would when new.  Check valve clearances is my practice on any long time stored 4 stroke.  Occasionally you find one that is stuck.  

Thanks very much, already good advice!

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you are welcome.  i think you got about anything else covered that I would do. 

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you can attempt to pull the swing arm bolt on the 400 and if you get it out lube it. also the wheel bearing should checked 

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12 minutes ago, Tryingoutdirt said:

you can attempt to pull the swing arm bolt on the 400 and if you get it out lube it. also the wheel bearing should checked 

AWESOME, thanks very much!

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Just a quick one: get some fork gaiters or shock socks, but good opportunity to check those seals first. You'll probably have to pull the tubes anyhow to get those on...

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20 minutes ago, jcascarano said:

Just a quick one: get some fork gaiters or shock socks, but good opportunity to check those seals first. You'll probably have to pull the tubes anyhow to get those on...

Yes, I already have the following on my TO DO/WISH LIST:

Handlebar Pads

Grips

Front Fork Boots

Drive Sprocket Cover

REAR Brake Disc Guard

Tail Light

What do you guys think about the overall looks of the bikes?

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43 minutes ago, JochenWoern said:

Yes, I already have the following on my TO DO/WISH LIST:

Handlebar Pads

Grips

Front Fork Boots

Drive Sprocket Cover

REAR Brake Disc Guard

Tail Light

What do you guys think about the overall looks of the bikes?

100 looks great. The XR4 looks like it's had some riding, but it's hard to tell the overall condition from photos. Generally, it's tough to break these things. A good wash could have it looking pretty nice.

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6 minutes ago, jcascarano said:

100 looks great. The XR4 looks like it's had some riding, but it's hard to tell the overall condition from photos. Generally, it's tough to break these things. A good wash could have it looking pretty nice.

Thanks.

I think the 400 looks rough as it has been sitting for a long time and has been somewhat neglected. I agree, after a good wash and some cosmetic touches, it might get back its shine. :) (Well, at least I hope so).

I will get both bikes for a total of 1500 bucks, thinking this to be a decent deal!!!???

I have been following the picture thread BEFORE and AFTER, and have seen some pretty bad looking bikes turning into jewels again. That's the plan I have for these bikes as well.

Edited by JochenWoern

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8 minutes ago, JochenWoern said:

Thanks.

I think the 400 looks rough as it has been sitting for a long time and has been somewhat neglected. I agree, after a good wash and some cosmetic touches, it might get back its shine. :) (Well, at least I hope so).

I will get both bikes for a total of 1500 bucks, thinking this to be a decent deal!!!???

I have been following the picture thread BEFORE and AFTER, and have seen some pretty bad looking bikes turning into jewels again. That's the plan I have for these bikes as well.

Heck, I'll buy them if you don't!

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4 minutes ago, jcascarano said:

Heck, I'll buy them if you don't!

I assume this means it shall be a good deal. ;-)

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Check the air boxes for mice nests. If the carbs have been sitting with fuel in the float bowls for 10 years, I bet they are a mess. Wouldn't even try to fire them up without a carb cleaning and inspection. That includes removal of the fuel screw.

Edited by Trailryder42

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Our routine is...
Check the oil, many bikes have no oil, we don't know why.
... some bikes are filled to the top, we don't know why.
Check the air filter, some will designate when you touch the foam.
We remove the carb, clear the pilot jet, 100% are blocked.
Dump the old gas on weeds in the yard, use some fresh fuel.
Bike usually starts on 1st or 2nd kick.
If not check for spark, kill button usually the problem, unplug the wires.
If it doesn't start after all that we part it out.
We've bought hundreds of bikes, this works well for us.
The bike in the pic we couldn't get started, we sold the parts.

 

IMG_9459.JPG

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Just wanted to reach out to ALL OF YOU, thanking you for all your valuable and especially quick advice. 

I am part of other forums and will say that this one here is a breath of fresh air, how I was welcomed and how quickly I received input to my questions.

THANKS AGAIN, I am convinced that with all your guys' help, these two bikes should be up and running in no time.

I will provide additional information in regards to the bikes exact years once we bring them home, and I will try to take additional, but better photos

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Don't forget to service your suspension components. After sitting for years the grease is likely dried out. Lube the linkage and swingarm bearings, and all the wheel bearings and steering head bearings especially on the 400 with the oil cooler. Then change the fluid in your forks and set oil levels correctly. Service the rear shock on the 400 or it may stick the rebound needle leaving you with no dampening.

Vat the carbs if possible, and be prepared for a re-ring job soon if the cylinders developed any micro corrosion from sitting. Much of the time a simple stock piston and rings with a basic hone can yeild new life on a motor for a long time if its not too far gone.

The XR100 probably needs a timing chain or at least an adjustment. IT can take out the cam gear on the crank if not properly tensioned and they stretch fast when worn out.The XR400 probably needs a valve adjustment. Once set they go a long ways.

The XR100 linkage has no bearings ony plastic sleeves. A Pivot works bearing kit may be a nice upgrade. A BBR or FF chain guide for the XR100 is a must if the boy gets very aggressive. The chain adjusters are junk on the little XR's so keep the chain in good condition or it will destroy the adjuster bolts when the chain throws. We have raced both of these bikes.

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Thanks again for everyone's valuable input.

One last question however:

Based on all I read and all the work involved to get these bikes up and running again, do you believe it is worth the effort? As mentioned, I will be getting BOTH bikes for a TOTAL OF 1500 dollars.

How much money will I need to spend in order to take care of everything you guys have suggested, anyone have a decent estimate?

Or am I better off to look for something else?

Thanks guys.

Edited by JochenWoern

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How many kilometers / miles did these bike cover? Do you think you need to replace the sprockets and chain? $1.500 does not sound as much for 2 bikes from 2000. I bought a XR250R 1988 from a colleague 2 years ago for € 500 ($1 = app € 1). But i have invested more then that amount on parts:

- 2 tires: $ 200
- camshaft: $120
- sprockets and chain: $ 120
- Oil seals & case bearings: $ 100+
- Seat: $ 75
- Front caliper maintenance: $ 50
- Gaskets (cylinder): $ 50
And various other stuff like levers, mirrors, oil, brake fluid

If all this repair is done by yourself and you see motor repair and maintenance as a hobby this is a justifiable investment I think. It will take you some time. If you have to go to the shop to let someone else do all this, it is going to get costly fast. It did most of the work myself, one of things that took some investment also was the tools to do the job. But the tools are here to stay, and can be used again on the next bike.

I would think that one of the risks you have is that some of the oil seals in the engine dried up too much and is going to leak. If that's the case, and you need to replace oils seals in the engine, you might be facing a big repair effort. I had to split the engine of my old XR250 and that was pretty time consuming.

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